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slaytonf

Movies you almost despair of seeing on TCM

66 posts in this topic

Never completely despair.  It's amazing, to think of it, the movies I've wanted to see that have shown up here.  I surprised myself with how long I could hold my breath.  There's That Man From Rio (1964--on again, btw, this month), the restored Metropolis (1927), the restored Funny Face (1957--finally!), The Abominable Dr. Phibes (1971), Plein Soleil (1960), and so many more.  But others. . . .you wait, you long, you hope *sigh*.  Perhaps--well, never completely despair:

Charley and the Chocolate Factory (1971).  About the best example anywhere of how a great actor can change an otherwise reprehensible waste of time and filmsotck into something not only worth watching, but enjoyable.  Gene Wilder is brilliant, and the only thing worthwhile in it.  There is a great song--no, not that one, which shall remain nameless, it's "Pure Imagination," but you don't have to watch the movie for that, it's been covered by lots of people.

The Road Home (1999).  Director Yimou Zhang's glowing, dreamy, recounting of the romance between a village girl and a transplanted grade-school teacher in cultural revolution-era China, occasioned by the passing in old age of the teacher.  Told in flashback, with the present in black/white, and the past in golden-light suffused color (ring a bell?), it manages to tell an intimate tale of a charming love story with a bit of an epic sweep.  And the ending gives you the same feeling about the human condition the the end of Ray's Apu trilogy does.  

Lucy and the Miracles (1970).  Now, I definitely know I'll never see this one.  It was one of the movies on an old TV anthology called The CBS Children's Film Festival.  It's a Czech movie filled with irreverent, anti-establishment types, round-pegging it through a square-holed society.  The story centers around a little orphan girl, played by what must be the most adorable child actress ever, who makes it her job to find parents for her fellow orphanage inmates.  Does she find ones for herself?  You'll have to watch the move to find out.  (Hint: if you can understand Czech, try Vimeo.)

They Might Be Giants (1971).  This one is the hardest to hold with my imperative not to despair.  It's almost worth trying to be a guest programmer so I can request it.  It's not a great movie.  It's flawed.  In many places it drags, or gets silly, or can even make you cringe.  But it is magnificent.  And Joanne Woodward and George C. Scott give two of their best respective performances in it.  The story is a modern-day, as of '71, reenactment of Sherlock Holmes' and Dr. Watson's titanic struggle with evil personified in Prof. Moriarty.  They traipse around, through, up, down, and under New York in their quest, eccentric characters piling up one on the other to the extent that the center of normality shifts, and they become rational.  And the supermarket scene--I'll tell you, many movies try to create zaniness.  Almost all fail miserably, coming up with only awkward clumsiness.  But in this movie--it works! Delightful, playful--and zany.  But the ending is what it's all about, transcendence, and madness.  All wrapped up in an agonizingly beautiful score by John Barry.

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BTW---

CHARLIE AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY is the title of the Roald Dahl novel, and the 2005 film adaptation by TIM BURTON starring JOHNNY DEPP.

The 1971 film musical  starring GENE WILDER was titled WILLY WONKA  AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY.

I'm not that familiar(if at all) with the other movies you mention, but sure, IF the ever get on the schedule, and if their broadcast at convenient times, and I HAVE the time, I'd give 'em a look.  

However, one I wound up liking(when I first saw it as an add-on to the "feature" I wound up NOT liking at all) was a suspense/thriller called DADDY'S GONE A-HUNTING" from 1969 starring PAUL BURKE and CAROL WHITE.  I won't say much except that it's a "revenge" story kind of movie.  I saw it at a drive-in along with the "newer" presentation of LET'S SCARE JESSICA TO DEATH('71) which near BORED me to death more than anything else.  The "Daddy's Hunting" movie had me on the edge of my seat, while "Jessica" sent me over the edge of tedium.  ;) 

I wouldn't mind seeing IT on TCM sometime.

Sepiatone

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It's a Wise Child (1931) stars Marion Davies and had great reviews as a comedy romp. The film is tied up in copyright issues and is the only Davies talkie never shown on TCM.

 

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42 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

BTW---

CHARLIE AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY is the title of the Roald Dahl novel, and the 2005 film adaptation by TIM BURTON starring JOHNNY DEPP.

The 1971 film musical  starring GENE WILDER was titled WILLY WONKA  AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY.

 

My only excuse is it was late and my brain was tired.

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2 hours ago, slaytonf said:

My only excuse is it was late and my brain was tired.

I HOPE that's the only excuse, and not "The Tim Burton version was the one I saw first as a kid."  ?

There's been a recent shakeup over MGM/UA films suddenly being more accessible on streaming--may have even fallen into a sort of Public Domain after MGM finally went under again in '10--so I know I've seen They Might Be Giants turn up on Netflix at one point, back before things got worse.  Unfortunately, the American Int'l copy of Dr. Phibes fell into ownership limbo with private DVD companies, so that's a little trickier.

And thanks to music rights, we have every other orphaned 80's MGM/UA film showing up on streaming, cable and disk but not Electric Dreams (1985), which hasn't even been seen on TV since local stations showed movies.

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HORROR OF DRACULA (1958) because there is a 2012 BFI restored cut with scenes added to Dracula's daylight disintegration demise. unlike the Americanized cut that tcm insists on showing the restored cut has the original british opening titles with a nice embellished D.

tcm was so moved by the passing of Christopher Lee that they didn't procure the superior version and show it.

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I would love for TCM to air They Might Be Giants. I saw it on tv ONCE a long time ago (cant remember if it was TCM, but I doubt it) It's a film that seems to be forgotten and bombed on release but is worth seeing (James Goldman wrote the screenplay) But it's a Universal release, so the odds of it popping up on TCM are slim........

I think the rock group took their name from the film's title.

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13 hours ago, slaytonf said:

They Might Be Giants (1971).  This one is the hardest to hold with my imperative not to despair.  It's almost worth trying to be a guest programmer so I can request it.  It's not a great movie.  It's flawed.  In many places it drags, or gets silly, or can even make you cringe.  But it is magnificent.  And Joanne Woodward and George C. Scott give two of their best respective performances in it.  The story is a modern-day, as of '71, reenactment of Sherlock Holmes' and Dr. Watson's titanic struggle with evil personified in Prof. Moriarty.  They traipse around, through, up, down, and under New York in their quest, eccentric characters piling up one on the other to the extent that the center of normality shifts, and they become rational.  And the supermarket scene--I'll tell you, many movies try to create zaniness.  Almost all fail miserably, coming up with only awkward clumsiness.  But in this movie--it works! Delightful, playful--and zany.  But the ending is what it's all about, transcendence, and madness.  All wrapped up in an agonizingly beautiful score by John Barry.

I saw They Might Be Giants a couple of years ago. It's a quirky, charming comedy drama, with terrific performances about from its two lead stars. I wrote a review of it at the time and about its ending, which is a subject of speculation by most who see it, I wrote:

The film's final scene will undoubtedly baffle many viewers because of its ambiguity. It's a moment that is clearly open to interpretation. But I think that scene, and this film, are about the soaring human spirit, and a belief in one's self even though logic and all around you may tell you that you are wrong. 

It would be lovely if TCM got the television release of this film, which is extended by ten minutes over the 88 minute theatrical release.

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5 hours ago, Hibi said:

I would love for TCM to air They Might Be Giants. I saw it on tv ONCE a long time ago (cant remember if it was TCM, but I doubt it) It's a film that seems to be forgotten and bombed on release but is worth seeing (James Goldman wrote the screenplay) But it's a Universal release, so the odds of it popping up on TCM are slim........

I think the rock group took their name from the film's title.

I don't think it's ever been on TCM.  Used to be on YT, but now you have to *gulp!* PAY.

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OP: Lucy and the Miracles (1970). Now, I definitely know I'll never see this one. It was one of the movies on an old TV anthology called The CBS Children's Film Festival. It's a Czech movie

Was the show was called "The CBS Children's International Film Festival"? Or possibly have different titles different seasons?

There was a film once shown when I was 10 or so, also Czech, that (realized when pressed) planted the seed of inspiration for my unusual career choice. I just HAD to see it again to confirm it really was as I remembered.
It took awhile to track down the title just from plot description & estimated date. AVGEEKS.com had a compilation of "naughty children" vintage films and this rarity was included! I was amazed to see 45 years later, the story was almost exactly as I remembered it-the strong images & story line. I suppose it helps that it's mostly pantomime, no language barrier. Finally! The internet is a positive thing!

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I have been watching old movies since I was a child and saw the Million Dollar movies on TV programmed out of NYC. You could watch them over and over again. I love TCM but greatly disappointed that they do not program and Charlie Chaplin movies. They were so entertaining, funny and dealt with cultural diversity and history without being in your face. Why are they not shown? Suggest something like a marathon like TCM has done with the wonderful Thin Man series? Just a thought.......

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16 hours ago, slaytonf said:

I don't think it's ever been on TCM.  Used to be on YT, but now you have to *gulp!* PAY.

I may have watched it on one of the networks decades ago. Yeah, I doubt it was TCM.

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Should I give up hoping TCM will make some serious programming time available to show Rainer Werner Fassbinder's "Berlin Alexanderplatz"???

Here are the running times:

 
  • 894 min (West Germany)
  • 931 min (US)


 


 

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10 hours ago, Paula B said:

I have been watching old movies since I was a child and saw the Million Dollar movies on TV programmed out of NYC. You could watch them over and over again. I love TCM but greatly disappointed that they do not program and Charlie Chaplin movies. They were so entertaining, funny and dealt with cultural diversity and history without being in your face. Why are they not shown? Suggest something like a marathon like TCM has done with the wonderful Thin Man series? Just a thought.......

Chaplin movies haven't been on a lot recently.  But all his feature films have been shown often, except, I think A Countess From Hong Kong (1967).  Perhaps we could see more of his earlier two reelers--aside from The Immigrant (1917), that is.  

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5 hours ago, CaveGirl said:

Should I give up hoping TCM will make some serious programming time available to show Rainer Werner Fassbinder's "Berlin Alexanderplatz"???

Here are the running times:

 
  • 894 min (West Germany)
  • 931 min (US)


 


 

Perhaps in installments, along with the Saturday morning serials.  Mmmm, Fassbinder for frühstück.

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I almost despair of ever seeing Bo Widerberg's Joe Hill (1971). It was apparently some kind of Swedish-American coproduction and released in this country by Paramount, so who knows what kinds of rights issues may be in play. I don't think it's ever had a VHS or DVD release. The only reason I've seen it was that, back in 1971, a distributor shipped the wrong movie to the local movie theater; some people just walked away but I'm so grateful I stayed to watch. A few years later I hitchhiked from Cape Cod to Boston in a snowstorm to catch it at an MIT film series showing. Widerberg and actor Thommy Berggren had worked together on Elvira Madigan (1967), which had been an art house hit with a limited general release in the U.S., but Joe Hill apparently went nowhere fast. I honestly don't know enough about the historical Joe Hill to say how factually accurate the movie was, but I do know that the memory of it has stayed with me all these years.

joe-hill-movie-poster-1971-1020255507.jpg

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I vaguely remember this movie, but didnt see it......

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Is there a good reason why All That Jazz or The Passenger or If... aren't on TCM?

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On 6/6/2018 at 8:16 AM, DougieB said:

I almost despair of ever seeing Bo Widerberg's Joe Hill (1971). It was apparently some kind of Swedish-American coproduction and released in this country by Paramount, so who knows what kinds of rights issues may be in play. I don't think it's ever had a VHS or DVD release. The only reason I've seen it was that, back in 1971, a distributor shipped the wrong movie to the local movie theater; some people just walked away but I'm so grateful I stayed to watch. A few years later I hitchhiked from Cape Cod to Boston in a snowstorm to catch it at an MIT film series showing. Widerberg and actor Thommy Berggren had worked together on Elvira Madigan (1967), which had been an art house hit with a limited general release in the U.S., but Joe Hill apparently went nowhere fast. I honestly don't know enough about the historical Joe Hill to say how factually accurate the movie was, but I do know that the memory of it has stayed with me all these years.

joe-hill-movie-poster-1971-1020255507.jpg

I have the song The Ballad of Joe Hill by Phil Ochs from 1968 in my iTunes collection. It was the first I'd ever heard of the guy.

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Posted (edited)

Here are the movies from theyshootpictures.com top 500 that have never been on TCM: 

#39  Blade Runner (1982, Scott)

#68  Shoah (1985, Lanzmann)

#61  Mulholland Drive (2001. Lynch)

#94  The Shining (1980, Kubrick)

#100  Satantango (1994, Tarr)

#102  Once Upon a Time in America (1984, Leone)

#107  The Mother and the W*or* (1973, Eustache)

#116  Star Wars (1977, Lucas)

#118  E.T.  the Extra-Terrestrial (1982, Spielberg)

#123  L'Age D'Or (1930, Bunuel)

#124  Don't Look Now (1973, Roeg)

#131  Yi Yi (2000, Yang)

#149  Histoire(s) du Cinema (1998, Godard)

#151  The Gospel According to Saint Matthew (1964, Pasolini)

#156  Come and See (1985, Klimov)

#159  L'Argent (1983, Bresson)

#161  The Passenger (1975, Antonioni)

#168  Mouchette (1967, Bresson)

#169  Dekalog (1989, Kieslowski)

#178 Celine and Julie Go Boating (1974, Rivette)

#179 The Travelling Players (1975, Angelopoulos)

#182  Spring in a Small Town (1948, Fei)

#192  The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974, Hooper)

#194  Fargo (1995, Coen)

#196  The Thin Red Line (1998, Malick)

#201  Cache (2005, Haneke)

#202  Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom (1975, Pasolini)

#204  Le Samourai (1967, Melville)

#208  A City of Sadness (1989, Hou)

#209  Schindler's List (1993, Spielberg)

#211  Breaking the Waves (1996, Von Trier)

#217  Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981, Spielberg)

#218  Two or Three Things I Know About Her (1967, Godard)

#220  Wavelength (1967, Snow)

#223  The Big Lebowski (1998, Coen)

#231  The Colour of Pomegranates (1968, Parajanov)

#232  Black God, White Devil (1964, Rocha)

#236  El Verdugo/The Executioner (1963, Garcia Berlanga)

#238  Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004, Gondry)

#240  The Tree of Life (2011, Malick)

#246  Magnolia (1999, Anderson)

#247  The Thin Blue Line (1988, Morris)

#251  Tropical Malady (2004, Weerasethakul)

#253  Floating Clouds (1955, Naruse)

#258  Distant Voices, Still Lives (1988, Davies)

#273  Love Streams (1984, Cassavetes)

#274  Memories of Underdevelopment (1968, Gutierrez Alea)

#282  The Empire Strikes Back (1980, Kershner)

#283  An Autumn Afternoon (1962, Ozu)

#284  Kings of the Road (1976, Wenders)

#286  The Matrix (1999, Wachowski)

#287  Underground (1995, Kusturica)

#292  All About My Mother (1999, Almodovar)

#295  Berlin Alexanderplatz (1980, Fassbinder)

#296  The Thing (1982, Carpenter)

#309  Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937, Hand)

#310  Terra em Transe (1967, Rocha)

#313  Dawn of the Dead (1978, Romero)

#314  The Puppetmaster (1993, Hou)

#315  The Time to Live and the Time to Die (1985, Hou)

#321  Listen to Britain (1942, Jennings)

#325  Eyes Wide Shut (1999, Kubrick)

#328  The Killing of a Chinese Bookie (1976, Cassavetes)

#330  City of God (2002, Meirelles)

#332  In the Realm of the Senses (1976, Oshima)

#333  The Crime of Monsieur Lange (1936, Renoir)

#335  El (1952, Bunuel)

#337  The Green Ray (1986, Rohmer)

#339  Lost Highway (1997, Lynch)

#340  October (1927, Eisenstein)

#343  Happy Together (1997, Wong)

#344  Werckmeister Harmonies (2000, Tarr)

#348  Through the Olive Trees (1994, Kiarostami)

#353  Last Tango in Paris (1972, Bertolucci)

#354  Landscape in the Mist (1988, Angelopoulos)

#355  In a Year with 13 Moons (1978, Fassbinder)

#360  Tie Xi Qu:  West of the Tracks (2003, Wang)

#362  Quince Tree of the Sun (1992, Erice)

#363  Teorema (1968, Pasolini)

#366  The Tenant (1976, Polanski)

#378  The Celebration (1998, Vinterberg)

#380  If.. (1968, Anderson)

#381  Dogville (2003, von Trier)

#384  Brokeback Mountain (2005, Lee)

#387  The Shawshank Redemption (1994, Darabont)

#389  Army of Shadows (1969, Melville)

#392  1900 (1976, Bertolucci)

#396  Fight Club (1999, Fincher)

#397  The Cloud-Capped Star (1960, Ghatak)

#398  Carrie (1976 De Palma)

#399  Wall-E (2008, Stanton)

#403  Raise the Red Lantern (1991, Zhang)

#404  Monty Python's Life of Brian (1979, Jones)

#406  Out 1:  Noli me Tangere (1971, Rivette)

#407  Chelsea Girls (1966, Warhol)

#413  The Dead (1987, Huston)

#414  Dead Ringers (1988, Cronenberg)

#417  The White Ribbon (2009, Haneke)

#418  A Moment of Innocence (1996, Makhmalbaf)

#419  Barren Lives (1963, dos Santos)

#427  Land Without Bread (1932, Bunuel)

#428  A nos amours (1983, Pialat)

#429  Opening Night (1977, Cassavetes)

#430  Talk to Her (2002, Almodovar)

#431  Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives (2010, Weerasethakul)

#434  The Hour of the Furnaces (1968, Getino, Solanges)

#435  The Gleaners and I (2000, Varda)

#437  The Sound of Music (1965, Wise)

#441  Yellow Earth (1984, Chen)

#442  Punch-Drunk Love (2002, Anderson)

#447  The Turin Horse (2011, Tarr)

#450  Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000 Lee)

#452  The Death of Mr. Lazarescu (2005, Puiu)

#454  Platform (2000, Jia)

#456  Toy Story (1995, Lasseter)

#457  Halloween (1978, Carpenter)

#461  Muriel (1963, Resnais)

#465  The Road Warrior (1981, Miller)

#466  Elephant (2003, Van Sant)

#467  Boogie Nights (1997, Anderson)

#470  The Wind Will Carry Us  (1999, Kiarostami)

#471  Fantasia (1940, Various Directors)

#474  Oldboy (2003, Park)

#478  Safe (1995, Haynes)

#479  Short Cuts (1993, Altman)

#482  All That Jazz (1979, Fosse)

#483  La Region centrale, (1971, Snow)

#485  Naked (1993, Leigh)

#486  Les Vampires (1915, Feuillade)

#491  India Song (1975, Duras)

#493  The Lives of Others (2005, von Donnersmarck)

#495  Pinocchio (1940, Sharpsteen & Luske)

#497  Lost in Translation (2003, Coppola)

#498  The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser (1974, Herzog)

#500  Melancholia (2011, von Trier)

 

Edited by skimpole
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Aside from whether I would want to see any of the movies on the above list, I think some of them have been shown by TCM.  Trois Coleurs: Rouge (1994), An Autumn Afternoon (1962) and Land Without Bread (1932), I know have been aired, I recorded them.  Among the ones I think have been aired are Carrie (1976), The Thin Blue Line (1988), and Once Upon a Time in America (1984).

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5 hours ago, slaytonf said:

Aside from whether I would want to see any of the movies on the above list, I think some of them have been shown by TCM.  Trois Coleurs: Rouge (1994), An Autumn Afternoon (1962) and Land Without Bread (1932), I know have been aired, I recorded them.  Among the ones I think have been aired are Carrie (1976), The Thin Blue Line (1988), and Once Upon a Time in America (1984).

Well none of the movies you mention have been on TCM, according to this website http://moviecollector.us/reports/TCM_SCHEDULES_SUMMARY_alpha.htm   

There might be some confusion:  TCM has show White and Blue, but not Red.  It has shown Early Spring, Late Spring, Early Summer, The End of Summer, and Late Autumn, but not An Autumn Afternoon.  AMC actually did show the uncut version of Once Upon a Time in America sometime this decade.

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On 6/11/2018 at 10:33 PM, skimpole said:

Is there a good reason why All That Jazz or The Passenger or If... aren't on TCM?

I gave up on seeing "The Passenger" so finally just ordered the dvd. It was not quite as exciting as I thought it might be. Now "If..." would be fun to see again with Malcolm.

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22 hours ago, skimpole said:

Here are the movies from theyshootpictures.com top 500 that have never been on TCM: 

#39  Blade Runner (1982, Scott)

#68  Shoah (1985, Lanzmann)

#61  Mulholland Drive (2001. Lynch)

#94  The Shining (1980, Kubrick)

#100  Satantango (1994, Tarr)

#102  Once Upon a Time in America (1984, Leone)

#107  The Mother and the W*or* (1973, Eustache)

#116  Star Wars (1977, Lucas)

#118  E.T.  the Extra-Terrestrial (1982, Spielberg)

#123  L'Age D'Or (1930, Bunuel)

#124  Don't Look Now (1973, Roeg)

#131  Yi Yi (2000, Yang)

#149  Histoire(s) du Cinema (1998, Godard)

#151  The Gospel According to Saint Matthew (1964, Pasolini)

#156  Come and See (1985, Klimov)

#159  L'Argent (1983, Bresson)

#161  The Passenger (1975, Antonioni)

#168  Mouchette (1967, Bresson)

#169  Dekalog (1989, Kieslowski)

#178 Celine and Julie Go Boating (1974, Rivette)

#179 The Travelling Players (1975, Angelopoulos)

#182  Spring in a Small Town (1948, Fei)

#192  The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974, Hooper)

#194  Fargo (1995, Coen)

#196  The Thin Red Line (1998, Malick)

#201  Cache (2005, Haneke)

#202  Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom (1975, Pasolini)

#204  Le Samourai (1967, Melville)

#208  A City of Sadness (1989, Hou)

#209  Schindler's List (1993, Spielberg)

#211  Breaking the Waves (1996, Von Trier)

#217  Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981, Spielberg)

#218  Two or Three Things I Know About Her (1967, Godard)

#220  Wavelength (1967, Snow)

#223  The Big Lebowski (1998, Coen)

#231  The Colour of Pomegranates (1968, Parajanov)

#232  Black God, White Devil (1964, Rocha)

#236  El Verdugo/The Executioner (1963, Garcia Berlanga)

#238  Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004, Gondry)

#240  The Tree of Life (2011, Malick)

#246  Magnolia (1999, Anderson)

#247  The Thin Blue Line (1988, Morris)

#251  Tropical Malady (2004, Weerasethakul)

#252  Three Colours:  Red (1994, Kieslowski)

#253  Floating Clouds (1955, Naruse)

#258  Distant Voices, Still Lives (1988, Davies)

#273  Love Streams (1984, Cassavetes)

#274  Memories of Underdevelopment (1968, Gutierrez Alea)

#282  The Empire Strikes Back (1980, Kershner)

#283  An Autumn Afternoon (1962, Ozu)

#284  Kings of the Road (1976, Wenders)

#286  The Matrix (1999, Wachowski)

#287  Underground (1995, Kusturica)

#292  All About My Mother (1999, Almodovar)

#295  Berlin Alexanderplatz (1980, Fassbinder)

#296  The Thing (1982, Carpenter)

#309  Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937, Hand)

#310  Terra em Transe (1967, Rocha)

#313  Dawn of the Dead (1978, Romero)

#314  The Puppetmaster (1993, Hou)

#315  The Time to Live and the Time to Die (1985, Hou)

#321  Listen to Britain (1942, Jennings)

#325  Eyes Wide Shut (1999, Kubrick)

#328  The Killing of a Chinese Bookie (1976, Cassavetes)

#330  City of God (2002, Meirelles)

#332  In the Realm of the Senses (1976, Oshima)

#333  The Crime of Monsieur Lange (1936, Renoir)

#335  El (1952, Bunuel)

#337  The Green Ray (1986, Rohmer)

#339  Lost Highway (1997, Lynch)

#340  October (1927, Eisenstein)

#343  Happy Together (1997, Wong)

#344  Werckmeister Harmonies (2000, Tarr)

#348  Through the Olive Trees (1994, Kiarostami)

#353  Last Tango in Paris (1972, Bertolucci)

#354  Landscape in the Mist (1988, Angelopoulos)

#355  In a Year with 13 Moons (1978, Fassbinder)

#360  Tie Xi Qu:  West of the Tracks (2003, Wang)

#362  Quince Tree of the Sun (1992, Erice)

#363  Teorema (1968, Pasolini)

#366  The Tenant (1976, Polanski)

#378  The Celebration (1998, Vinterberg)

#380  If.. (1968, Anderson)

#381  Dogville (2003, von Trier)

#384  Brokeback Mountain (2005, Lee)

#387  The Shawshank Redemption (1994, Darabont)

#389  Army of Shadows (1969, Melville)

#392  1900 (1976, Bertolucci)

#396  Fight Club (1999, Fincher)

#397  The Cloud-Capped Star (1960, Ghatak)

#398  Carrie (1976 De Palma)

#399  Wall-E (2008, Stanton)

#403  Raise the Red Lantern (1991, Zhang)

#404  Monty Python's Life of Brian (1979, Jones)

#406  Out 1:  Noli me Tangere (1971, Rivette)

#407  Chelsea Girls (1966, Warhol)

#413  The Dead (1987, Huston)

#414  Dead Ringers (1988, Cronenberg)

#417  The White Ribbon (2009, Haneke)

#418  A Moment of Innocence (1996, Makhmalbaf)

#419  Barren Lives (1963, dos Santos)

#427  Land Without Bread (1932, Bunuel)

#428  A nos amours (1983, Pialat)

#429  Opening Night (1977, Cassavetes)

#430  Talk to Her (2002, Almodovar)

#431  Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives (2010, Weerasethakul)

#434  The Hour of the Furnaces (1968, Getino, Solanges)

#435  The Gleaners and I (2000, Varda)

#437  The Sound of Music (1965, Wise)

#441  Yellow Earth (1984, Chen)

#442  Punch-Drunk Love (2002, Anderson)

#447  The Turin Horse (2011, Tarr)

#450  Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000 Lee)

#452  The Death of Mr. Lazarescu (2005, Puiu)

#454  Platform (2000, Jia)

#456  Toy Story (1995, Lasseter)

#457  Halloween (1978, Carpenter)

#461  Muriel (1963, Resnais)

#465  The Road Warrior (1981, Miller)

#466  Elephant (2003, Van Sant)

#467  Boogie Nights (1997, Anderson)

#470  The Wind Will Carry Us  (1999, Kiarostami)

#471  Fantasia (1940, Various Directors)

#474  Oldboy (2003, Park)

#478  Safe (1995, Haynes)

#479  Short Cuts (1993, Altman)

#482  All That Jazz (1979, Fosse)

#483  La Region centrale, (1971, Snow)

#485  Naked (1993, Leigh)

#486  Les Vampires (1915, Feuillade)

#491  India Song (1975, Duras)

#493  The Lives of Others (2005, von Donnersmarck)

#495  Pinocchio (1940, Sharpsteen & Luske)

#497  Lost in Translation (2003, Coppola)

#498  The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser (1974, Herzog)

#500  Melancholia (2011, von Trier)

 

If they ever show "Salo" I will eat my shoes!

Hopefully I can find some made out of licorice like Chaplin's if this does happen. I would just be amazed...and probably be in an old folks' home by the time this occurs, due to rampant nudity and situations that go way beyond things like even "In the Realm of the Senses", "Clockwork Orange", "I Am Curious...Yellow or Blue" or anything I've ever seen. "Salo" makes "The Devil in Miss Jones*" look like a kindergarten movie by comparison.

*Do not confuse with "The Devil and Miss Jones" with Jean Arthur.

 

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18 hours ago, skimpole said:

Well none of the movies you mention have been on TCM, according to this website http://moviecollector.us/reports/TCM_SCHEDULES_SUMMARY_alpha.htm   

There might be some confusion:  TCM has show White and Blue, but not Red.  It has shown Early Spring, Late Spring, Early Summer, The End of Summer, and Late Autumn, but not An Autumn Afternoon.  AMC actually did show the uncut version of Once Upon a Time in America sometime this decade.

The Website is wrong.  I told you I recorded Trois Couleurs: Rouge and An Autumn Afternoon.  I said I was unsure of . . . .America.  But I think it was.

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