Pastiche

Most disliked musical or musical number

99 posts in this topic

Sweet Charity - Typical anti-romantic 60's musical. Story and music didn't pull me in at all. 

Nine - Musical based on Fellini movie with Daniel Day Lewis, who I love, but not in this

Finian's Rainbow - I keep trying to watch it, because I feel like I should like it, but I don't. 

Royal Wedding - Unfortunate Fred Astaire collaboration with Winston Churchill's daughter. 

Gigi - Ugh! I literally hate it. The story line of grooming a young girl to be a prostitute - with creepy, smarmy Maurice Chevalier "Thank Heaven for Little Girls"!

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On 6/4/2018 at 1:32 PM, speedracer5 said:

I am so glad you asked:

Most disliked musical numbers:

-"Heavenly Music" from Summer Stock.  This has to be the absolute worst musical number that Gene Kelly has ever done.  The song is irritating.  Gene and Phil Silvers' yokel act is tiresome after like 1 second.  I absolutely loathe this song and number.  The only redeeming part of it are the dogs at the end.  Supposedly, Judy Garland was supposed to appear in this number as well but she called in sick and the crew decided to go on without her.  I think Judy knew what she was doing and feigned illness to get out of having to appear in this routine.

-"Triplets" from The Band Wagon.  This whole song is strange and I just don't enjoy it at all.

-Jeannette MacDonald/Nelson Eddy/Kathryn Grayson... anyone who sings operatically doesn't do it for me at all.  When Grayson sings in Anchors Aweigh, I either skip ahead or use that time for a bathroom and/or snack break.

Disliked musical films:

-South Pacific.  As much as I like Mitzi Gaynor, I cannot stand this movie.  It's a total bore and I hated the strange colored filters that were placed over some of the scenes.

Disliked dancer:

Joan Crawford in (I think) Dancing Lady.  She is a terrible dancer.  She just clomps around.

Ruby Keeler.  She is an awful dancer as well.  Much like Joan, Ruby just clomps around on stage.  She reminds me of me when I do my tap dancing impression.

I agree, I dislike "Heavenly Music" and "Triplets" too. Now both are in my head!!

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The musical I like the least is 1974's Mame.  And while I'm at it, Lucille Ball gives the worst performance in a musical.  Poor Jerry Herman!  He had two big Broadway hits that became terrible movies (the other being the previous mentioned Hello, Dolly!).  I understand Lucy got the part because she was one of the deep-pocket producers.  Oh, where was Angela Lansbury when they needed her?

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23 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Re: Blackface in film.  Yes. It's unsavory when viewed with a 21st century mindset.  However, at the time that they were made, it wasn't seen as bad.  I'm not a fan of it either, but I just accept it as a sign of the times.  I do dislike Judy's blackface number in Everybody Sings because she's dressed up in a stereotypical manner.  Judy and Mickey also don blackface in one of their films together.  Fred Astaire and Eleanor Powell sport blackface in Swing Time and Honolulu, respectively.  Both are performing homages to Bill Robinson.  I appreciate that Fred didn't include the white lips with his blackface.  Eleanor included them in hers.  I think Astaire and Powell could have easily paid tribute to Robinson without blackface, but in the late 30s, this is what they decided to do.  

I think Mickey Rooney's yellow faced turn as Mr. Yunioshi in Breakfast at Tiffany's is more egregious than any of the blackface numbers I have seen, only because it's so stereotypical and I believe in 1961, during the middle of the Civil Rights Era, the filmmakers should have known better.  Rooney's performance is the only blemish on an otherwise entertaining film. 

Whenever I would watch Breakfast at Tiffany's I would cringe when Mr. Yunioshi appeared so I stopped watching it.  Why on earth wouldn't the producers/director/casting director choose a talented oriental comedian instead of Mickey Rooney with false teeth?  Makes no sense to me.

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I haven't seen very many, especially pre-1960. A lot of more modern ones I've seen were bad. I think GREASE 2 probably is the king of this category.

But there's some modern musicals that got awards nominations which I hated as films. My go to's for that are: SWEENEY TODD (2007), LES MISERABLES (2012) (don't @ me, Tobe Hooper's direction was terrible--hey hit us in the face with another close-up--as was Russell Crowe),  and FAME (1980).

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Just focusing on classic musicals because this list gets a whole lot longer with the inclusion of modern musicals.

Disliked Musical: I really can't stand Bye Bye Birdie. I've watched it a couple times to give it another chance but each time it's borderline painful. I love Ann Margret as an actress though.

Disliked Musical Number: Hands down it's "Doin What Comes Naturally" in Annie Get Your Gun. Ugh I can't stand this song!! I like the movie but I have to skip this song whenever I watch.

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This is a very unpopular opinion, but I really don't like Wizard of Oz or anything Judy Garland has done.

As for musical number: "When You're in Love" from Seven Brides for Seven Brothers. It's to high pitchy.

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5 hours ago, filmnoirguy said:

Whenever I would watch Breakfast at Tiffany's I would cringe when Mr. Yunioshi appeared so I stopped watching it.  Why on earth wouldn't the producers/director/casting director choose a talented oriental comedian instead of Mickey Rooney with false teeth?  Makes no sense to me.

They wouldn’t have even needed someone Asian if they couldn’t find someone—they just needed someone mildly funny who could get irritated by Audrey Hepburn. They could have made her landlord Mr Smith for all I care. 

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They showed an Eddie Cantor "musical" yesterday that was all Catskills schtick except for a couple solo's (by Eddie) spread out through the film. His voice is OK but the songs come out of nowhere. NOT a musical. Get it OFF your list TCM

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On ‎6‎/‎4‎/‎2018 at 8:31 PM, speedracer5 said:

I like Bye Bye Birdie.  Though I haven't seen the stage version to compare it to.  I do understand that the film was re-written to focus more on the Ann-Margret character because she was an upcoming new star at that time.  I read that Dick Van Dyke who was in the stage version, was unhappy that some focus was taken off his character and given to Ann-Margret.  I'm a big fan of Ann-Margret, so I didn't mind her being the main focus of the film.  I really like the "Lots of Livin' to Do" song.  Paul Lynde is hilarious, though I think he plays himself in every movie he does--which I don't mind, because the "Paul Lynde" character is so funny.  I thought that Ann-Margret could do better than Bobby "golly gee" Rydell, is a little too square for me, but I guess he makes a good contrast to Conrad Birdie. 

My main issue with Bye Bye Birdie is the casting of Conrad Birdie.  That actor was just too old and he's not cute.  I don't know why the girls would be going gaga over him.  Too bad they couldn't get Elvis.  I think that's who the filmmakers originally wanted.  I'd even take James Darren or Frankie Avalon or Fabian or maybe even Ricky Nelson.  I do love my 50s/60s teen idols (okay, Darren is my favorite because he's so cute).  Rydell is okay... but he's not my favorite. 

 Thank you for saying you like Bye Bye Birdie.  I was sad to see others disagree with you.  The first time I saw that film I was probably 8 or 9.  I LOVED the colors, the songs the feeling.  My mother used to play the record in our house all the time so I knew all the words to each and every song.  Same with Grease. I was in 8th grade when that movie came out and my sister worked at the movie theatre.  I would go to work with her and watch it over and over loving every second.  Thinking about where these films took us in our minds still sticks with me today.  Yes, some of the characters in the two films I just mentioned were to old for the part but for an 8 year old and an 8th grader I didn't see it and that began my true love of musicals.

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OK: I Love Lucy, I love Lucille Ball, I love Rosalind Russell in "Auntie Mame" but I HATE "Mame", well at least the movie version. IMO, it is a very boring train wreck. I think that Lucille Ball "jumped the shark" somewhere around 1964...

I adore "The Band Wagon" but I agree with the comments about the song "Triplets", whaddup wit dat?

I am a huge fan of Fred Astaire, and most of the Fred & Ginger movies are amongst my all time favorite movies, except I can't stand "Carefree" I find it icky and awkward, with all the phonus balonus psych stuff. I also am not that crazy about "The Barkleys of Broadway" but I can't say that I "hate" it, I just don't care much for it.

Out of all the Arthur Freed Technicolor MGM extravaganzas, I admit I just don't "get" "It's Always Fair Weather". I like some of the musical numbers, I appreciate Cyd Charisse, I love Gene Kelly dancing on roller skates, but I just do not connect with this one like I do with "Singin In The Rain" or "Meet Me In St Louis" or "On The Town" I don't hate "Fair Weather", but I don't get the immediate emotional resonance I get from those MGM masterpieces. 



 

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35 minutes ago, Pirate Santa Karl said:

Out of all the Arthur Freed Technicolor MGM extravaganzas, I admit I just don't "get" "It's Always Fair Weather". I like some of the musical numbers, I appreciate Cyd Charisse, I love Gene Kelly dancing on roller skates, but I just do not connect with this one like I do with "Singin In The Rain" or "Meet Me In St Louis" or "On The Town" I don't hate "Fair Weather", but I don't get the immediate emotional resonance I get from those MGM masterpieces.

It's Always Fair Weather was originally going to be a follow-up to On the Town, but somewhere along the line, the idea changed into the final end product.  This musical isn't one of my favorites either, but I enjoy the part with Gene and the roller skates.  I think the reason that this film ultimately isn't one of my favorites is because the film is a bit on the sad side.

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I have a few I can’t get through but if James Cagney is in and it’s a musical I’m usually cringing. Example is Yankee Doodle Dandy I just can’t with him. ? 

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2 hours ago, Cakane said:

I have a few I can’t get through but if James Cagney is in and it’s a musical I’m usually cringing. Example is Yankee Doodle Dandy I just can’t with him. ? 

Yankee Doodle Dandy seems to go on for your whole entire life, doesn't it?

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I love Easter Parade but I do not like the We're a Coupla Swells number. It seems endless and hearkens back to a kind of vaudeville entertainment that I guess I just don't appreciate.

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On 6/4/2018 at 11:50 PM, Zea said:

- "Finian's Rainbow". Whatever became of Don Francks anyway?

- "The Pirate". An embarrassment for Garland & Kelly. Only redeeming value was finale: "Be A Clown".

- Any musical having dance scenes w/Cyd Charisse. When she's on the screen I fast forward or change channels. Whatever her character, she can't get that smug, elitist look off her face no matter how fast she twirls or how high she kicks.

-"Summer Stock". Not so much for the cheesy plot. It's unwatchable for me because all I'd focus on is how the studio plied Judy w/so many diet pills & trussed her up so much to slim her down, and she still had to suffer the  humiliation of daily complaints about her weight. If she wasn't desperate for money at the time, I don't think she ever would've  endured the stress and done it.

 

Judy is rather plump throughout Summer Stock until she does the "Get Happy" number when she's suddenly thin as a rail.  Somewhere in the past I read that Judy was called back several months later to film "Get Happy," which was an after-thought to spruce up the film.  She had gone on a diet and looked terrific.  Personally, I think "Get Happy" is one of the best numbers Garland ever performed in any of her musicals.

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23 hours ago, corinne54 said:

Sweet Charity - Typical anti-romantic 60's musical. Story and music didn't pull me in at all. 

Nine - Musical based on Fellini movie with Daniel Day Lewis, who I love, but not in this

Finian's Rainbow - I keep trying to watch it, because I feel like I should like it, but I don't. 

Royal Wedding - Unfortunate Fred Astaire collaboration with Winston Churchill's daughter. 

Gigi - Ugh! I literally hate it. The story line of grooming a young girl to be a prostitute - with creepy, smarmy Maurice Chevalier "Thank Heaven for Little Girls"!

Actually, Astaire was starring with Jane Powell in Royal Wedding with Sarah Churchill in a rather small supporting role.  I like several numbers in this musical, including Fred dancing as the room revolves around him, also dancing in the ship's gym with a hat rack, Jane Powell's beautiful "Too Late Now" that received an Oscar nod, the on-board duet as the ship is listing about, the "I Left My Hat in Haiti" number with the monkey, and their comedy routine to "How Could You Believe Me When I Said I Loved You When You Know I've Been a Liar All My Life?".  Granted the plot is rather thin and it's not a 4-star musical, but enjoyable just the same.

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8 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

It's Always Fair Weather was originally going to be a follow-up to On the Town, but somewhere along the line, the idea changed into the final end product.  This musical isn't one of my favorites either, but I enjoy the part with Gene and the roller skates.  I think the reason that this film ultimately isn't one of my favorites is because the film is a bit on the sad side.

Same for me; the boredom with life among the three old friends starts to put me in a bad mood! Of course, the dance number with the trashcan lids is clever, and Cyd's boxing ring number is fun, but for me, the standout musical number is Delores Gray's "No Thanks" performance. I just loooooooove her voice! I wish she had made more films.

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13 hours ago, Cheryl52 said:

 Thank you for saying you like Bye Bye Birdie.  I was sad to see others disagree with you.  The first time I saw that film I was probably 8 or 9.  I LOVED the colors, the songs the feeling.  My mother used to play the record in our house all the time so I knew all the words to each and every song.  Same with Grease. I was in 8th grade when that movie came out and my sister worked at the movie theatre.  I would go to work with her and watch it over and over loving every second.  Thinking about where these films took us in our minds still sticks with me today.  Yes, some of the characters in the two films I just mentioned were to old for the part but for an 8 year old and an 8th grader I didn't see it and that began my true love of musicals.

I was in the 8th grade, as well, when GREASE hit the theatres, so we are probably about the same age. I also didn't think anything about the ages of the actors- it was too fun to care!

BYE BYE, BIRDIE is a film that has grown on me throughout the years. I used to really dislike it. Now, I really love Janet Leigh's dance number at the men's club ( she's so underrated as a musical performer), "A Lot Of Livin","The Telephone Hour", and my favorite, the sped up ballet scene. I also love when Ma puts her head in the oven and Albert says "Ma, it's an electric oven." ?

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5 hours ago, filmnoirguy said:

and their comedy routine to "How Could You Believe Me When I Said I Loved You When You Know I've Been a Liar All My Life?".  Granted the plot is rather thin and it's not a 4-star musical, but enjoyable just the same.

Great novelty number.  I was curious about composer/lyricist for this 1951 film (Royal Wedding).... lyrics were by Alan Jay Lerner (My Fair Lady, etc.) , music by Burton Lane (Finian's Rainbow, On a Clear Day).  Wow.  

And according to Wikipedia, Lane "discovered" Judy Garland. Yet shooting this film led to MGM cancelling Garland's contract. Who knew?: 

Quote

Lane is credited [2] with discovering the 13-year-old Frances Gumm (Judy Garland).[3] He caught her sisters' act at the Paramount theater in Hollywood which featured a movie and a live stage show. The sisters, Virginia and Mary Jane, brought on their younger sister, Frances, who sang "Zing! Went the Strings of My Heart". Lane immediately called Jack Robbins, head of the music department at MGM, and told him he'd just heard a great new talent.

Robbins told him to bring her in next day for an audition which Lane did. Robbins was knocked out by the little girl's voice (Lane played the audition piano for her), rushed upstairs and dragged Louis B. Mayer down to listen to her belt out some songs. Mayer was so impressed he ordered every writer, director and producer on the lot to hear her with the result that the audition, which began at 9 am, finished at 7:30 pm. Frances (Judy) was signed, and that was the start of her career. Because of circumstance, and contractual arrangements, Burton Lane didn't work with her again for seven years (Babes on Broadway), but it was definitely he who discovered her.[2][3]

Quote

.[1] Judy Garland was then signed as Ellen [in Royal Wedding] due to [June] Allyson's pregnancy... Arthur Freed brought in Donen as director; Garland, who during rehearsal worked only half-days, started calling in sick as principal photography was to begin. That prompted Freed to replace her with Jane Powell, which in turn caused MGM to cancel Garland's contract with the studio, one that had lasted 14 years.[1]

 

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On 6/6/2018 at 4:54 PM, filmnoirguy said:

Actually, Astaire was starring with Jane Powell in Royal Wedding with Sarah Churchill in a rather small supporting role.  I like several numbers in this musical, including Fred dancing as the room revolves around him, also dancing in the ship's gym with a hat rack, Jane Powell's beautiful "Too Late Now" that received an Oscar nod, the on-board duet as the ship is listing about, the "I Left My Hat in Haiti" number with the monkey, and their comedy routine to "How Could You Believe Me When I Said I Loved You When You Know I've Been a Liar All My Life?".  Granted the plot is rather thin and it's not a 4-star musical, but enjoyable just the same.

I've never been able to sit through the whole movie and I've obviously missed all the gems you mention. I will watch properly in the future. Thanks.

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On 6/6/2018 at 4:42 PM, filmnoirguy said:

Judy is rather plump throughout Summer Stock until she does the "Get Happy" number when she's suddenly thin as a rail.  Somewhere in the past I read that Judy was called back several months later to film "Get Happy," which was an after-thought to spruce up the film.  She had gone on a diet and looked terrific.  Personally, I think "Get Happy" is one of the best numbers Garland ever performed in any of her musicals.

"Get Happy" is pure Garland on top of her game.  I've read that Garland was struggling during filming (she looks sluggish in the beginning of the movie). She took some time off  and when she returned to the studio to film Get Happy., she had put herself back together.   Get Happy is the best thing in Summer Stock, it is very evident they added this to end of the film, because Garland is trim, svelte, even sexy in that black tuxedo jacket and confident as she belts out this song and dances.

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Reading through the posts it's intetesting to see how one person's meat is another person's poison.

Adding my own two cents I must admit I turn the channel whenever I see a Deanna Durbin, Katherine  Grayson or Jeanette MacDonald film. Though, I have learned to admire MacDonald as a comedic actress.and the course has encouraged me to watch their films and taught me to appreciate their place in musical genre history. But I still cannot get past how the operatic style musical just isn't my thing. Give me Judy, Fred and Ginger, Kelly, Debbie, Sinatra, Durante etc any day.

I know it borders on sacrilege but I'm really not a big fan of Streisands either. Her singing is amazing but her acting leaves me wanting. She is so overly pompous at times I really never learned to like her characterizations. I'm also not a big fan of Esther Williams either. She was such a stilted actress. Her water scenes were spectacular chiefly bc they were choteographed and often directed by the great Busby Berkley. So I enjoy them but can't watch the rest of the movie.

At the end of the day it's different strokes (no pun intended) for different folks.

Thanks for allowing me to get that off my chest...whoot

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If Saturday Night Fever is considered a musical, that would be the one I hate most.  it's on my top five list of worst movies I've ever seen. Hate. It. 

Tommy is also on that same list. 

Along with Pink Floyd's The Wall

And, yeah, The Wiz was pretty awful. 

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