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DAILY DOSE OF DELIGHT #2 (From Rose Marie)

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1. The interaction between the two seems to show the differences in background without belaboring the point. Eddy seems to be the average Joe while MacDonald is the sophisticated socialite type, lower/middle class presented against the upper class. In the first clip while he has no problem saying what’s on his mind she seems she puts on airs, not so much playing hard to get but carrying about her an atmosphere of above him socially. The second clip tosses her into his world, one where art isn’t so much the be all to end all deserving full blown attention from those listening. Instead it’s raucous and rowdy, less sitting calmly and listening and more interaction. You can tell in the clip it’s not what she’s used to. In addition to that you can see that the behaviors on display seem crude and crass to her, a fish out of water if you will. The interaction she has with Eddy in this scene shows he is willing to be more accepting than her while she has a sense of shame that only increases knowing he is there. That air of superiority on display in the first clip is gone replaced by shame and yet in both you can see neither one affects him or his affections for her.

 

2. I’ve not seen one of these movies in decades so can’t comment on this question.

 

3. The depictions one could gather here seem to show the male role as the lead and female as a more subservient one. In addition to that we get the idea that the male protagonist is chivalrous and inclined to play things straight while the female tends to play games and maneuver her way to what she wants, at least by the first clip. The second clip shows how that maneuvering doesn’t always go as planned and leads to embarrassment. But it still shows that concept of male superiority in it with Eddy un-phased by what’s going on in this locale and accepting of her no matter what.

 

As for the depiction of the two with the code enforced the interaction between the couple versus the interaction of the saloon singer with the customers displays the differences in what could be considered moral versus immoral. MacDonald is the essence of purity in comparison to the free moving, hip shaking style of the saloon singer who does what it takes to survive and make money from a group of what some would consider lowlifes but are simply working stiffs. Post code would want to portray the saloon singer as a fallen woman who is willing to do anything for a buck and the star, MacDonald, as the symbol of virtue in spite of the world she’s thrown into and thus the object of affection for the hero in the film. It places her on a pedestal to be worshipped and him willing to do so. Of course real life isn’t composed of the black and white differences in people but this is the movies.

 

 

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1)  Nelson Eddy has a casual tone to his voice and is trying to get her attention while they are in the canoe.  MacDonald is playing it cool and disinterested.  You can already tell that he likes her a lot; her maybe but she's not letting on whether she is or isn't interested.

  

2)  In the second scene, MacDonald makes a complete fool of herself trying to sing the song in her operatic voice and no one is paying any attention.  She even tries a different song.  Eddy comes in and sits with some of the dance hall girls looking completely oblivious to the fact that Jeanette is singing and getting completely ignored.  However, instead of jeering, or making a snide comment, or laughing at her, you can see compassion in his face.  When the other woman takes over, she just slowly exits the building.  She is just embarrassed that this floozy can get their attention but she cannot.

3)  I know I've seen this movie, Maytime, and some of their other ones, but I cannot remember the names.  They were pretty much the same where he likes her, she doesn't let on that she likes him, and in the end - he gets the girl.  They sang beautifully together.  Too bad that when MacDonald went off on her own, Eddy just seemed to flounder.  

 

 

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What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples.            

They are one of the most adorable couples on screen. Haven’t seen any of their films but excited to get to know the characters and where the adventure leads. At this time from just seeing two clips, he is the hero, knight in shining armor, always to the rescue, perfect Mountie. Geez could he be anymore gorgeous hunk of a gentlemen. He is all for the girl playing and toying while he stakes a claim. She goes for the bad boys, hence the Italian Tenor. There is a underlying knowing but she continues to play hard to lasso. Although, seeing the failed saloon scene her character can be quite timid yet open to suggestion, she is seen fleeing. The two watch and ponder one another and off he goes to save the day or should I say catch the girl.  Cute cute cute 

If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them.

What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code? 

Courtship, appropriate lingo, playful yet not over the mark of what your great great grandma would approve.

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1. In the canoe scene, there is an obvious flirtation coming from Bruce's side of the relationship to which Rose Marie, in a sense, tries to shrug off. It isn't until he tries to serenade her that the audience gets the idea that maybe she actually does feel the same way towards him. However once she starts complimenting him on the song, he boasts about how he could simply change the name in the beginning from Rose Marie to any other woman's name as long as it has 3 syllables.

In the second clip, we see Rose Marie looking uncomfortable while singing in a saloon. She is put into an even more embarassing situation when she is upstaged by another singer who "kicks things up a notch." Bruce is at the saloon with two other ladies, but he notices how confused and out-of-place Rose Marie feels at the moment. When she runs out of the saloon, instead of just forgetting about her, Bruce leaves the saloon to try to console her.

2. Apart from these two clips, I have never seen any other movie with these two actors in them. From the chemistry that I saw them sharing in these two scenes, I can see why they were often paired together.

3. Instead of the whole "love at first sight" scenario, these characters were taking their time in establishing their relationship with each other. Their relationship just seemed like it was being formed in a more natural way. Even though a canoe ride in the moonlight usually screams romance, we have to take a look at how they are sitting. While Bruce is sitting so that he is facing Rose Marie, she is sitting with her back facing him. This creates a barrier between the characters that even limits their eye contact with each other. Therefore, they only have their words and attitudes as a means of expression.

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I was watching Eddy paddle the boat, if they were moving they would be going in circles, just part of the lack of realism in earlier musicals. May be a metaphor for the relationship they are starting? They were MGM's squeaky clean couple. I'm currently reading Neal Gabler's "An Empire of their Own,  How the Jews Invented Hollywood. It goes into the start of the exhibitors' end of the movie business and how Edison had a strangle hold on the industry. How the influential and wealthy looked down on the movie industry, and the lower class that enjoyed it. Very similar to how the Production Code came about.  

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Marie is clearly out of her element in that saloon , you can hear her voice above all that surrounds her, and yet  when wants in her heart to quit  but she knows  that she must continue as she is not given the response that she had hoped, she spots Sgt. Bruce the interaction  for these two is all in the eyes, the eyes tell the story. he grows to understand her , and she her self . that all  for both to start a relationship.                                                            

The pairing of McDonald &  Eddy  on screen together was pure magic , Hollywood wanted a depiction of romance, that told a story , that had to pass the Hollywood film code  and would appeal to all ,let you  imagine the rest, and had two classically trained  singers who both had  screen appeal.           

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                                      

                                                                                                                        

 

 

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Jeanette is in total control in the first scene making Nelson uncomfortable. In the second scene their roles reverse and she is uncomfortable and out of place. In all their movies 6ou know they are destined for a great love and it’ s Just a matter of time until it happens.

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1. The two characters were very prim and proper in the canoe.  That was very different from the dress and interactions in the precise movie, Broadway Melody.  (Love at a distance.)  The bar scene was very interesting.  Everyone was involved in their own conversations.  They were definitely not interested in Rose Marie.

2.  My Mom and my husband always talk about these actors.  I am new to these older movies.  Someone told us we were MacDonald and Eddy at our reception because we sang to each other during our wedding ceremony.

3.  The characters seemed to be polarized as good girl/bad girl, chaste/shady.  The character portrayals were very dynamic.

 

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1. The shift of power is the most obvious. Rose Marie is in control and has confidence in the boat when she's putting him in his place after swapping out different girls' names in the song. In the saloon, she has lost her confidence and is completely out of her element. She is humiliated to know someone she is familiar with has witnessed such a performance. 

2. I actually never really got into the Eddy/MacDonald films so I can't comment to this. 

3. It's interesting to see them alone in a boat together and that being acceptable. I suppose I think of that era in more "proper/improper" terms and that might be an unfair perception of the time. The stark contrast of Rose Marie and the other saloon singer is almost too overt. They leave very little to the imagination and don't allow much nuance for the characters themselves. They are seen as they are on the surface: skin tight dress and exposed versus completely covered up and we are expected to buy into those personas of good girl v. bad girl and in this case accept that Rose Marie does not belong in that environment as she is perceived to be better than that. 

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Clip 1: The characters relate well as both are in their element.

Clip 2: Rose Marie learns you can't get rich playing another man's game! Totally out of her element but I love Jeanette MacDonald's attempts to mimic the blonde bombshell who takes over the room with her singing style. Jeanette can laugh at herself-that's confidence!

 Sidebar: Although it has a lengthy (overly so IMO) operatic number near the end, "Maytime" is my all time favorite Eddy/MacDonald film-just sweet and sentimental but in an endearing way.

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I think the theme concerning the relationship between the characters is one that has transcended the decades through film in Hollywood: The high society debutante-type, who at first, feels as if she's too good for her admirer. Many of the Tracy/Hepburn films, "Moulin Rouge", "Notting Hill", "When Harry Met Sally", "Shakespeare In Love" while not all musicals, are all based on that same theme.  We root for the sweet, poor, bumbling guy who is head over heals in love ... And we are rarely disappointed, that is at least as Hollywood goes!

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What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples.

In both scenes, the characters are together, yet separated. In the boat, she is in front of him and has to turn completely around in order to interact with him… which she doesn’t totally do. There, they speak to each other without making much eye contact. In the saloon, they are facing each other, but unable to hear each other speak, and making genuine eye contact with each other. In some ways, in the second scene, they are closer to each other than in the first. The eyes are the windows to the soul, after all. Making eye contact is what makes them feel closer together, while the playful banter in the boat makes them feel distant because they’re not making a connection with each other.

If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them.

I saw them in “The Merry Widow”, which is an operetta movie musical. I couldn’t stand watching it because they costuming, setting and their voices were so stilted… I’m sorry to say! I couldn’t feel a sense of romance beyond all the satin.

What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code?

I actually think the male/female relationship they display in this movie is still the way new couples interact with each other now. Nothing much has changed in the realm of romance. Playing games, teasing each other, ignoring their attraction, yet trying to look good in front of the other. There are always going to be the girls and guys who “will” and the girls and guys who “won’t”… and the distinction between which one of those options is the “right”/“best” one. The norm is that the good girl (who “won’t”) is the right choice. And yet, the girls who “will” are still considered a good option to pass time with until the right one (good girl) comes along.

It’s interesting to me that the woman singing and dancing in the saloon does a provocative dance in a skin-tight dress that reveals everything she’s go going on in the middle of the prim and proper budding romance of Jeanette’s and Nelson’s characters. Seems to be a blur there between production code vs. pre-code.

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1. In the first scene, the interaction has a definite direction because of Nelson Eddy's character's objective. He is trying to woo Jeanette MacDonald by one-upping the other man that she already likes. He is following a traditional way of courtship, singing to her as a guitar player might serenade a woman in fair Verona under her balcony, and seems used to the way she expresses little interest - what he may see as playing hard to get. Jeanette, however, truly does show no interest until he sings to her, and only after she is impressed by his voice and his humor does she play along and smile. She respects his talent and the effort he goes through to get a positive reaction from her.

In the second scene, the interaction has little direction concerning the two of them directly, it mostly revolves around her in a new situation, and he comes in later and watches her. They do interact, however, just indirectly. She is obviously flustered and embarrassed by first her unsuccessful attempts to sing to the crowd and secondly what she knows she will have to do to engage them, and leaves when she realizes this and sees Nelson watching her. She doesn't want to appear as 'that kind of girl' to him. He, however, feels sympathy for her position as he sees how uncomfortable she is, and because he leaves to go after her it is apparent that he respects her for trying to fit in but ultimately refusing to 'stoop down' as the other girl did.

2. I have not seen other films with them

3. This era seems to support the classic, sophisticated form of courtship that goes far back into time, where the man shows off what he can do to impress the girl, and she is expected to not be overly eager, but play hard to get and make him work for her affection. This is one of the most important tropes under the Hollywood Code. There is a bit of a modern twist, however, in the way that humor an wit are infused, and the active role of the female in the relationship does seem a bit more pronounced and important than it might have been far earlier.

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  1. What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples.

The power differential seems to flip. In the canoe scene, MacDonald is barely tolerating Eddy, though his singing opens a **** in her armor. By the end of the scene, she shakes it off and essentially writes him off again. In the saloon scene, MacDonald is the one who is seeking attention/validation and is embarrassed when she notices Eddy. Clearly she cares more about him than she's letting on. 

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1. What I notice about the interaction between the two characters in the two scenes is how sweet and considerate they are with each other. Yes, she mocks him a little, but it's not mean--it's cute. He's sincere when he's singing to her in the canoe and he's genuinely concerned about her when she's humiliated in the saloon.

2. My perceptions about the actors are that he's very talented musically, although he's a bit stiff. She's lovely with an incredible voice.

3. The clips tell me that male/female relationships depicted in films during this era were more subtle and proper, while still being romantic at the same time. The norms that I might expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code are that courtships were chaste with clear rules and expectations and that romance was more elegant and proper.

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  1. What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code? By today’s standards they are quaint and quiet innocent. Norms supported would likely include marriage before sex.

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In the first clip, it is Rose Marie who is confident, in control of situation, relationship...in second clip she is vulnerable and unsure.  In both the Sargent keeps composed and strong, but shows his definite attraction to both sides of Rose Marie.  

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He is obviously smitten with her but she is playing cool.  Yet when she sees him in the saloon where she is outside of her element and not acting so aloof, I think she is concerned how he will react to her performance.  She is also conflicted as she has seen him with the singer that so easily connected with the audience and was much more approachable and I think she might be wondering if he could really be interested in her since she is not as relaxed and theatric.  

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1.  She obviously likes his tenor voices and compliments him both with her voice and eyes.  Then he teases he by substituting Caroline and other girls names.  She teases back. A classy relationship is developing and is hinted at through their facial reactions and teasing. In the second film, as she is trying to switch from operatic classy singing to the vauldville style and is really making fun of the other performer, she leaves because she is embarrassed and show that she cares about what he thinks.  He obviously is really admiring her gutsy performance. 

2. She stars in the love parade, love me tonight, the Merry Widow and one hour with you.  She is always featured as a soprano singer.   She was one of the most influential sopranos of the twentieth century 

3.  The expectations of the code was classy relationships and dress code.  

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  1. These two have great screen chemistry, knowing how to match glance-for-glance, acting when not speaking, all to a greater effect by the two paired. It's amazing to me how much I was taken by their acting--not their singing. That's party because I find the operatic style a bit off-putting, even if their voices are beautiful. So even when her singing style made to be a counterpoint, with her style played for laughs and pathos, in the second clip, I can appreciate her pipes yet don't really enjoy. But the couple and their acting--that I liked. There's genuine affection--and attraction--between them. Most of all, I loved their repartee and comic timing. I enjoyed that more than the singing. 

2. They both seem familiar, yet I can't recall distinct reactions other than, "yeah, that guy" and "she was in something." Again, given my reaction to their comic timing, I hope to see more soon. 

3. As the code took some time to really take hold, there are part of these clips that were still a bit provocative. Yet you get the sense that there's something viginal to their relationships. Even as he's shown with girls on each arm, you don't get the sense (at least from these clips) that he's more than an adult boy scout, which is reinforced by his uniform. She seems more like she's "looking for love," not "playing the field."  

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I have not seen any of Nelson Eddy"s films with except his appearance in "Dancing Lady". I have seen Jeanette MacDonald in "Love Me Tonight" and "San Francisco" however. I knew she was a great singer but I was surprised by how good of an actress she was. 

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1. From both clips, it is clear that both Jeanette Macdonald's character and Nelson Eddy's are attracted to one another, but that they're trying not to show it, Jeanette's character a little more than Nelson's. While their interactions are relatively formal, with physical distance between them in both scenes, Macdonald's attempts to appear uninterested as Eddy sings to her, or Eddy's concern as he watches her slip out of the saloon unnoticed belie much more going on below the surface than mere dialogue would suggest.

2. Jeanette Macdonald is one of my favorite actresses, and I've seen most of her movies, both with and without Nelson Eddy. Not forgetting their marvelous classically-trained voices, I think they both had a real flair for drama and comedy, something many "actors" (as opposed to "singers who can act" as they were) don't always manage, though Jeanette was definitely the more natural of the two. No matter what her role, she always managed to be charming, genuine, funny, spirited, and yet vulnerable, with a warmth and relatability that just lit up the screen. She and Nelson Eddy were a couple off-screen as well, and I think that chemistry is what makes their on-screen pairings so appealing to audiences.

3. Both clips show that the Post-Code norms about male/female relationships dictated a more formal, proper approach to courtship, and that witty banter and silent glances were preferable to the slightly more explicit forms of romantic expression available in the Pre-Code period. Jeanette's character is expected to behave in a modest, ladylike fashion, while Eddy's Mounty must likewise remain a gentleman. That isn't to say that characters weren't allowed to have strong feelings for each other, only that the expression had to be classy and respectable. The use of the brassy, blonde saloon singer showing up the more ladylike Jeanette with her slightly racy dance is a great example of these two different approaches.

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1. The interactions between the two are playful and coy, especially in the scene on the boat. Even though Eddy's character sings a sweet song about Rose-Marie, she doesn't immediately fall into his arms instead teasing him while he teases her by replacing her name with names of other women. It's the typical back-and-forth banter you see in all romantic comedies.

2. I knew of Eddy and MacDonald before this course, but haven't seen a film or TV show with them in it.

3. These clips demonstrate how romances under the Production Code are supposed to be - romantic, but still proper. The two characters flirt with each other and trade barbs, but they don't fall into each others' arms immediately. Eddy and MacDonald's characters are portrayed as upstanding people - Eddy's character is a Canadian Mountie and MacDonald's character is nicely juxtaposed with the saloon singer which demonstrates how proper and classical she is. I imagine that romances in all movies made under the Production Code are very similar to this - light, uplifting, and funny but with just enough romance that it stays within the morally acceptable boundaries. 

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The interaction between these characters feels a bit flirty but I would describe it more as friendly flirting. They play the role to show that there may be something much deeper to both characters.

I don't recall seeing these two before, but, my experience with older musicals is limited. I do feel as if I have seen the relationship repeated with other musicals I have experienced. They have a very familiar chemistry between them. I'm sure the sweet youthful relationship that is being projected is in part due to the film code. Light and "safe" flirty is becoming the new norm.

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1. I think both actors are displaying very appropriate behavior traits for this time period of the Film Code era.  They are being polite, coy and slightly flirtatious in their speech and mannerisms. While sitting in the canoe, MacDonald can't even look Eddy in the eye for too long, so she will not give him the impression of being TOO ATTENTIVE and INTERESTED in him!

2.  I have never seen any of the MacDonald-Eddy movies before, although I knew of their popularity on the screen as a couple and of their impressive vocal talents.

3.  These clips demonstrate to me that the man will always have the upper hand in relationships with the woman.  The man will expect the woman to follow his suggestions pertaining to where the romance may be headed or even how to win over the crowds with a vocal performance.  I understood that Jeanette's singing was not "peppy" enough for the saloon crowd, but was annoyed that the piano payer did not give her any compliments on her vocal abilities! She clearly is over talented for that audience and the pianist couldn't even realize it! He was more concerned with her trying to move her hips and to sing the song like a floozy!  Sad that she was so defeated and embarrassed, but at least Nelson felt sympathy for her which led to him following after her to hopefully make her feel better.

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