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DAILY DOSE OF DELIGHT #2 (From Rose Marie)

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1. It was interesting to observe the body language in the two scenes. In the first, Nelson seems very stiff in both acting style and posture. Jeannette on the other hand, seemed almost languid and relaxed. Her flirting seemed more natural. In the second scene,Nelson seems much more relaxed as he is hanging out with his entourage. Jeannette on the other hand, is humorously uncomfortable in both her singing and dancing. Her embarrassment at being discovered in singing in the dive is also provides a contrast to Nelson's behavior.

2. I've seen all the Nelson and Jeannette movies. They are a bit formulaic but the singing is mighty fine. And there are some great sets.

3. Snappy patter between the sexes who hate each other at first but later...

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  1. What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples.

Eddy and MacDonald in Rose Marie are shot in the selected scene in a loosely framed two shot; there's a slight distance between them to signify the growing interest in each other.  There is a playful exchange between them as they travel across the lake.  Their verbal tag-teaming is a delicate courtship: it's friendly but puts a tension between them.  In the later scene in the saloon, Eddy watches as MacDonald tries to edge herself in where she truly doesn't fit.  Her voice (to steal from Victor/Victoria) is "too legitimate" and she is ultimately bullied offstage by the jazzy saloon girl.  Eddy eventually breaks free of the company of the other saloon-girls to come to MacDonald's aid.

  1. If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them.

From just my common knowledge of both actors, Eddy and MacDonald stared in 7 or 8 films together, always playing the same type of roles.

  1. What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code?

Since scenes of intimate contact weren't allowed during the Code Era films, the interplay of snappy dialogue between men and women had to stand as the representative for courtship.  What the actors couldn't do with their bodies, they'd have to imitate with their eye contact and very cleverly written dialogue.

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In addition to the attraction/revulsion of the two people, the second scene (and the first to a limited extent) illustrates a bit of a class distinction between Eddy's entrance into the saloon while acting familiar with all the rough and seedy characters, and McDonald's distancing herself from all the distasteful characters in the saloon, She takes a long time until she starts to be comfortable dancing and singing,  and when she dips her toe in their milieu--she sees Edd's character. That starts the discomfort and revulsion again.

The depiction of the pure innocent woman is obvious part of the Code, and that has to be McDonald's basic character in every movie.

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Lots of chemistry going on in that canoe. I didn't realize how beautiful JM was. I also like her comedic timing. I really hadn't seen them in any other performances. That was my loss for sure. I want to see more of them together. I was surprised at the suggestive dance in the scanty dress. Seems very racy. Definitely had a good and bad girl role!

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1. In both clips, it strikes me that the interaction between the two characters seems to be mostly at arm’s length. They are close in the canoe, but they barely look at each other and Marie acts cool and disinterested. In the second clip, she clearly has fallen in stature and is embarrassed, yet Sgt. Bruce treats her no differently. However, in the first clip Marie clearly is in control of the situation whereas in clip 2 she is not in control at all.

2. I have not seen these actors in any film or on tv, but I have my dvr set to record tomorrow.

3. Again, I bring up the distance between the characters. There is no physical closeness between them other than their proximity to one another. The closeness comes in their interactions, in their eyes and in the way they act with each other. Musicals of this era usually feature similar plots where either there is a misunderstanding or the men and women start off on the wrong foot and then fall in love, ending up together after hinjinks or shenanigans. The men usually pursue the women and the women resist until finally they cave. I would expect these to be the types of norms that were acceptable under the code because it would be a way to keep the characters apart until the very end when they would embrace and MAYBE kiss. Such suggestive behavior would have been frowned upon! ?

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1.  What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes?

Their interactions, to me, are friendly, flirty, but a bit mocking.  Teasing about careers poet, polo player, etc.  Counter teasing about the name of the girl he is singing about.  You can see the attraction forming between them, but they do appear ready to recognize it.

2. If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them.

I don't remember seeing them in other movies or shows, but I love his voice and have several of his records.

3. What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era?  What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code?

These clips tell me that relationships are often both advisarial and protective.  They spend their time sparring, but when one person is hurting the other prerson is there to help.    I think this goes back to the idea of the pure woman in need of protection by the strong hero.

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I love the video lecture and I really love the Daily Doses!  What great medicine.  

I love the light banter.  The sexual tension is very light, but still palpable.  This is my first exposure to Nelson Eddy, but after seeing this clips, this is on my watch list!  As always, Code movies are very "PG"  Even the ladies of the night are covered from head to toe!  I always expect to see long dresses, very little touching and lots in innuendo!

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1. What I noticed between the two was how comfortable they seem to be with one another. For example, their back and forth playful humor and the blunt conversation between them. The second clip showed how they communicated with each other and felt emotions such as embarrassment, fear and admiration without speaking. McDonald obviously has interests in Eddy other wise she would not have turned away from him when he entered the scene. I love scenes like that because it tells so much without saying anything.

 

2. I have only seen Miss MacDonald in one film which was San Francisco. I remember thinking she had a beautiful voice and displayed a very natural and believable feeling of innocence about her.

 

3. They tell us that during that time the public had a certain expectation of how men and women should behave toward one another and part of that behavior should include modesty and discretion. I am not very familiar with the film code of that era, but I would imagine that a typical norm may have been the avoidance of pervasive language. 

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This is not important but I do have a question that anyone may chime in on. I was wondering if anyone else noticed what seemed to be a hand that waved behind Mr. Eddy in the first scene? I may have been mistaken but whatever it was I found it to be a bit distracting at first.

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In the first scene, where Nelson Eddy's rowing the boat and expressing his attraction for Jeanette MacDonald in "Rose Marie" I notice a lot of tension between them initially when he tries first to verbally win her over. His attempts to find out if his competition is superior to him by their vocation increases the suspense until MacDonald tells him his rival is another singer.

From there, he confidently belts out a beautiful song, "Rose Marie", that eventually cracks MacDonald's frosty veneer because it sounds as if it was composed specifically for her. Strangely the tension returns when he reveals he changes the name of the song to suit the woman he's wooing at the time, creating a comedic tone, that ends with her sarcastically playing along by tossing out other names he might use. Eddy's final joke about, "Nothing worked with Maude", is a slight double entendre that's bawdy enough to remind the viewer they're watching an adult love scene, but clever enough to adhere to the Hay's code.

The second scene, in the cafe with MacDonald trying to earn a living by singing in a jazzy style then being upstaged by a more salacious performer, while Eddy looks at her with pity displays a tenderness from him not seen in the boat. Instead of responding with gratitude, however, MacDonald "haughtily rejects" him by departing. Since it was still considered improper for women, like the character she's portraying, to work in establishments like this cafe her reaction is appropriate. 

A double standard, for men and women, definitely existed then and is exemplified in these two scenes where it seems like it's okay for Eddy to express his interest and pursue the opposite sex but it's not okay for MacDonald to showcase her more sensual side without being seen as a fallen woman. For this duo and the era they performed in, this cat and mouse exchange is considered romantic and definitely of the period.

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What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples. What I noticed was the I like you but I am a smart girl who know how men operate in many of the musicals.  They found they like each other but knew that they had relationships with other that they could not get so close to find out their true feelings. When he was singing in the canoe she was drawn to him but new he was probably giving her a line so she would fall for him.  Marie called him out, letting him know that she was not going to fall for it.  In the saloon she was embarrassed by her actions but he was trying to support her by telling her it okay you just aren't that kind of girl.

f you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them. I have seen them in other movies and I loved to listen to the voices.  I like they comedic timing and how they interact with one another to make even simple jesters funny.

  1. What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code? I think what they tell us about male/female relationships is that they men wait until for women to come to them for the relationship to start.  Men always seem to be waiting in the wings setting the stage for the reluctant women to come to them.  I think they do not want the good girl in the picture to be the aggressor having the man be their for them until their love story is complete 

 

 

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      The interaction between the principles in these two scenes reflects the complex and conflicted relationship of the two in the storyline. They are at cross-purposes, even as they fall in love. Rose Marie is searching for her fugitive brother (played by James Stewart), who is wanted for murder. Sgt. Bruce knows this and is following Rose Marie to find him. In the process of this cat & mouse game, they fall in love. In the canoe scene, Bruce uses humor and his voice to start to melt her icy demeanor. He is doing this to gain her confidence, and she is starting to fall for him. The setting is romantic, but the exchange is reserved and proper (one could assume the romantic options in a canoe on a lake would be somewhat limited). While it is Rose Marie who softens towards Bruce in the canoe, it is Bruce who softens towards her in the saloon. Though her operatic style is out of place in this setting, she is game to try.  She fails spectacularly, but he admires her pluck. The impact of the Code shows here: when she first starts copying the singing & movement of the other singer, she seems uncomfortable with it, but not shocked by it. However, when the movements become more wild and provocative, it is too much for her moral sensibilities, and she beats a hasty retreat. She is willing to sacrifice her personal dignity but must protect her moral integrity. This is reflective of the general nature of male/female relationships depicted in films produced under the Production Code.

 

      I have seen them in many movies, both together and separately. As a child of Rock and Roll, their operatic style of singing took some getting used to. I enjoyed them, back then, in spite of their singing; now, I enjoy them and appreciate their voices. “Naughty Marietta” (their first) is my favorite.  

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One can see that the two are smitten with one another in the first clip, but can't get the words across. Eddy's tries his best to start something with McDonald, but she seems uninterested, especially when he tries to compare himself with the gentlemen she is already with. When he does find a common factor, he begins to sing, which at first McDonald brushes aside but finds herself smiling and taping along with the song. When he finishes the song, instead of expressing his feelings towards her, he brushes the song and says he can add any name, replacing Rose Marie to his leisure. Which leaves McDonald annoyed and once again unimpressed. On the second clip, as McDonald is singing, her style of singing does not match or impress the saloon goers and she lacks their attention. She's given another chance at a more lively number, but keeps at the same style as before and still doesn't receive any attention from the audience, that is till Eddy arrives.

I have not seen any of Nelson Eddy's and/or Jeanette McDonald's films, but I have heard of the actors and have seen clips of their work during segments from That's Entertainment 2. My only perspective of the two were the chemistry between each other and the amazing classical singing abilities each share. 

There is an innocence and respective outlook between the two when it comes to romance. On the canoe ride they both have feelings towards one another and it is obvious to the audience. They both are respective of one another space and do not embrace each other in longing embraces, extended eye contact, as well as kissing. It is more in the way, when they act alone that gives out their understanding about what they are looking for ad well as their long for one another.

 

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In the first scene she's playing hard to get and makes fun of him because he's been singing the same song to other girls (like that's his line) and in the second scene she shows her vulnerability and their eyes meet and you can tell how much he likes her.  He's doing the chasing.    

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1.  To me it is evident,  just from that few moment clip,  that Eddy and MacDonald really digs one another, they are alone in a canoe on a gorgeous night in the middle of nowhere!   Just within the first few moments of the clip starting, you could hear the warm tone of his voice and his sincerity of basically saying  "you have everything you need in this townands in this canoe!".  Macdonald certainly knows how to play hard to get,  but she definitely is giving a positive signal with Edddy with her beautiful yet playful eyes.

2. Ive seen Jeanette McDonald in an old fave of mine, San Francisco and  Rose-Marie.

3.  It seems the male-female interaction, still male dominant. And no matter what,  sexuality still "sells" The women are the "entertainers" and that just ordinary singing wasn't sitiing well with the bar patrons, beding completely ignored,  because Macdonald was not oozing her sexuality.  I assume the code had restrictions of how much and what would be considered vulgar and over-the-top sexuality etc...

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1. What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples.

In both scenes, I notice that both characters have a playful affinity with a hint of sarcasm towards each other. In the rowboat scene, they establish a challenging, yet friendly volley of quips during the changing of the women’s names that are replaceable within the song. For most of the rowboat scene, they are not even looking at each other, yet talking between themselves as if they already have a familiar understanding between themselves. There’s also a non-verbal understanding between Nelson Eddy’s character and Jeanette MacDonald’s character in both scenes. For example, at the end of the rowboat scene, when she gives him “the look”, Mountie Bruce shuffles his oar and paddles hurriedly. In the second scene inside the saloon, they are across the room from each other, but without saying a word, the expressions on each of their faces have an instant communication towards one another.

2. If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them.

I have not seen them in other films or shows. This is my first insight to the both of them.

3. What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code?

The male/female relationships are more playful, romantic and depict characters from two different worlds overcoming obstacles to ultimately “win” each other over in romance. The females almost always seem a bit smarter in their quips while dominating the emotions within the romance. The male is set to take on a challenging quest to win her love.

The Hollywood Film Code I suspect would have supported the norms such as the balance of known, classical music and singers embedded into the early movie musicals of the day. I believe they would also support the more wholesome imagery of the depiction of romance, culture and definitely wardrobe. Because sound has just made its way into musicals, I’m sure that the code would support more wholesome dialogue and music as well.

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Interesting that Eddy just comes out and sings that he loves her and she never tells him that she likes him.  She does say he has a lovely voice, but that is all.  He's all out there and she keeps it all inside.  She is the sweet lady who is classy and sophisticated while in the club, all the other women in there (notice I did not say ladies), are obviously loose women.  They are dressed scantily and are sitting closely to the men, if not touching them, close enough to do so.  The other singer was the total opposite of Jeanette and seeing Jeanette try to bring herself and her performance onto the same plane as the other singer was funny and disturbing at the same time.  Jeanette did such a great job of looking ashamed and embarrassed when she picked up her purse and left the room that you felt the shame and embarrassment yourself.

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  1. What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples.                In the first clip, Jeanette's character seems to be annoyed by Eddy.  She kind of cools when he starts singing but quickly acts annoyed again when he says the wrong name.   In the second clip I think she is embarrassed, both by actually singing in a saloon and not doing it "correctly".  She especially did not want Eddy seeing her there, in my opinion.
  2. If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them.                             I've seen Jeanette in a few other movies, like San Francisco and The Merry Widow.  She's a great actress and singer.  She always seems to be reluctant to accept the advances of the leading man but by the end she's in his arms.  I'm pretty sure that I've seen Eddy in a couple of movies but I don't recall which ones right now.
  3. What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code?.            The "good girl" plays hard to get.  I think the whole good girl persona is the norm.  I have to say I was surprised to see the saloon singer's costume and the way she was dancing.  1929's version of twerking!

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You can feel the chemistry between the two in both scenes even though she is trying to hide it.  I have not personally seen either that I can recall in other films. From dress to inteacti9ns they were following the Hollywood code

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The romantic interaction between the characters is chaste as chaste can be.  Clearly the production code runs this film.  

First clip shows a man clearly wanting to impress the new gal in town.  He is a man used to attention and getting his way through his masculine charms. She is at first clearly uninterested and irritated at his attempts to charm.  Once she reveals that her love interest is an Italian singer, Bruce gets the go ahead to show off his talents.  Maries is charmed at first, but then realizes through Bruce's faux pas, that he is really full of himself. She still feels an attraction, his voice and charms have got to her.

The second clip shows Marie's vulnerability, clearly she can sing, but is not prepared for the saloon.  When the larger than life Mountie Bruce shows up, he is welcomed like the hero. Everyone greets him and the ladies are all over him.  Even as Marie struggles to sing, she notices his entrance.  Once humiliated by both the crowd and the saloon gals performance (how did they get away with the obvious nipplesuque?), she sees the handsome Mountie watching her and flees the scene.  He will follow her, as predictable as it gets. Made so by the formula repeated over and over in the Eddy/MacDonald film pairings

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I loved JM's acting in this second clip. She clearly has a wonderful sense of humor as she tries to hopelessly imitate the other singer. There is so much sensitivity and actual sophistication in the way she handles this scene - with a real sense of self mockery at her attempts to be "peppy" - that I fell in love with her. Much more subtle acting and awareness than I usually imagine in these older formuaic movies.

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The first clip has a very sweet, romantic tone with Bruce serenading Marie. She seems like tough chick, playing hard-to-get and comes across somewhat sarcastic when she rolls her eyes or takes a heavy breath. Bruce tries to convey his love for her through song, hoping that the music will soften her. He succeeds to a point, as you see her smiling, relaxing and enjoying the music, but she soon loses her patience with him.

The second clip conveys Bruce’s attraction to Marie. His eyes are studying her in a calm, subtle way. He is observing the scene with care and interest. He almost seems entranced by Marie and concerned about her situation. Distressed and uncomfortable from not being able to fit into the musical/entertainment style, Marie does not notice that Bruce is in the saloon until near the end of the scene when she looks at him in surprise. She clearly does not have much time for him because she quickly turns her head away, holding her head up higher to raise status as leaves the saloon. Bruce soon gets up from the table and walks out of the saloon to follow Marie; further displaying his attraction towards her.

I have not seen any movies with Nelson Eddy and Jeanette MacDonald and I must say that I was very impressed by his voice – so warm, deep and full.

These clips show beauty, innocence and romance. Plots of movie musicals during the production code era were often quite simple - boy meets girl, boy loses girl, boy sings and song and wins girl. The male/female relationships were depicted in a light-hearted, romantic way without becoming sexualised or crude. Everything was presented as polite and respectful.

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I've never watched the movie or saw the actors in anything else before. Quite enjoyed the two clips, I might watch the full film. :)

I love the banter in the first clip, especially when Rose Marie was proving her point by singing the song with other names inserted. The interaction was fun and romantic.

However, in the second clip I had sympathy when Rose Marie was singing but became upstaged by the other character. Both were great performers but it was obvious that Rose Marie was more of a "traditional" performer (for the period in the movie) whereas the other character was more fun and exciting. 

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  1. What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples.

In each of their films, Eddy is the down-to-earth pleasant guy while McDonald is much more stiff and wary.  She shows some disdain for him, but eventually learns he is the man for her.

  1. If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them.

I always liked McDonald better, or only thought of Eddy as part of a team, but a few years ago, I was at a relative's retirement party at a resort in Pennsylvania  and the Nelson Eddy Appreciation Society was having their annual conference there.  This made me think of him as a separate entity and a performer in his own right.  

  1. What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code?

Their relationship is soooo pure!  When you watch McDonald trying to mimic the dance hall girl, you see that she could never ever be like that.  It reminds me of the scene in Victor/Victoria when Julie Andrews is auditioning, but is too high brow for the establishment.

 

 

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Nelson Eddy and Jeannette Macdonald 2 clips:

Movie Maniac 2018 

1. The interaction between the characters in these 2 clips: 

1st clip:

Eddy likes MacDonald.. He is disappointed that he is rowing a boat for the woman he fancies to pursue another man.His way to show her his interest is by singing a song to her made up spur of the moment! It is a catchy and very likeable number.

2nd clip: 

When MacDonald realizes her singing is not compatible with the crowd/audience she searched the crowd for one person any person that will appreciate her operetta singing style.  Then Eddy walks in- even though he has two women with him she feels relief because she thinks Eddy will appreciate her music.  But one of the women who is a saloon girl chimes in with MacDonald and tries to take over the show singing the same music in a burlesque fashion. At that point MacDonald is frustrated and shies away from the audience and leaves the saloon.  While in Clip 1 she barely likes Eddy but in Clip 2 she acts relieved to see him and her advances seem more emphasized. the norms for this era i expect to see are more of the same: where man pursued a woman..but she doesn’t instantly respond. Some films leave it to the viewers own opinion what is happening behind closed doors.

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