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DAILY DOSE OF DELIGHT #2 (From Rose Marie)

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What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples.

The relationship between the characters in the first scene is playful, yet somewhat restrained in nature. They are poking fun at one another, yet we can see there is an attraction there. Sgt. Bruce's song, for example, can be sung using any girl's name which Marie points out must work for him when courting other ladies. But at the same time we can tell by her facial expressions and changing demeanour throughout the scene that she enjoys his company and his efforts to humour her. But neither lets their romantic urges get the best of them, even alone in the middle of a lake in a canoe.

In the second scene, the characters do not interact one-on-one; however, we can discern that there is quite a sincere connection between the two. Marie's attempt to exit her comfort zone clearly moves Sgt. Bruce, and only solidifies his love for her. Marie is bothered by the presence of Sgt. Bruce because perhaps she does not want to disappoint him or be an embarrassment. She masks her inward turmoil with humour, so as not to appear as if she is taking it as seriously as she is. But she doesn't fool him, and we see that in the way he looks at her with a genuine concern for her feelings and understanding of her internal situation.

What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code?

There is a playfulness to the male/female relationship during films of this era, coupled with the ability to suppress any urges which may come off as inappropriate or poorly timed. The wholesome nature of courtship seems to be focused on, but with an added sense of humour so as not to come off as stuffy or too formal. I would expect that norms surrounding "proper" behaviour are supported under the Film Code, and male/female relationships would adhere to the "rules of courtship" while also treating the situation with wit and fun. I also expect that the subtleties of falling in love, such as depicted in the 2nd scene between Sgt. Bruce and Marie, and the elegance of a proper romance would become the most desirable way to showcase these relationships on screen under the Film Code.

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The two scenes are quite different. In the first scene flirting and light. He's joking about always taking her to meet another guy. He sings a touching song then let's her know he just inserts the girl of the moment in.  She jokes right back offering up names. The second scene is where it crosses over to being clear how much they care for each other. He's not talking over her singing or laughing. She's uncomfortable through the entire situation but more visibly shaken when she sees him and that's when she leaves the room.

I'm not familiar with this acting duo.

In just the two clips, as far as production code I noticed the character Rose Marie was dressed quite prim and proper, especially compared to the women in the bar, clearly signaling the audience as to how a 'good girl' should look and behave.  Also, going off the two clips, I'm getting the idea from production code that solid good guy  is going to go for the prim and proper gal, eventually.

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1. What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples.

There seems to be a mutual attraction and chemistry between the two.  In the first clip, both Bruce (Eddy) and Marie (MacDonald) are seen sitting in a canoe, with Marie facing away from him the majority of the time.  She only looks back from time to time when his singing piques her interest, or he tips his hand and attempts to show his growing interest in her - at first it's a relationship of necessity/convenience but changes as their affection grows, something that is seen in the plot of romance movies.  They exchange witticisms, each trying hard as to not tip their hand to the other in regards to how their attraction/feelings (How she tells him to keep paddling, how she doesn't comment on his voice too much even though she enjoys it, and how he says the song is a never fail romance starter where he can sub whatever woman's name in).    

In the second clip, Marie is struggling to fit into an obviously foreign environment as evident in how she is being ignored by the majority of the bar patrons and how she can't seem to fit her voice and movements to the piano accompaniment.  When Bruce enters, he is first greeted by the two women who seem to regularly work the bar both which are stark contrasts to Marie's soft, feminine, and very innocent appearance.  He soon spots Marie, and one can see the different emotions playing over his face - admiration at how brave she is when Marie is attempting to mimic the saloon girls techniques and compassion when he sees her clearly uncomfortable as she flounders and fails.  Bruce chivalrously follows to see if she is okay/to comfort her.

 

2. If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them.

I have seen them both in various films, MacDonald seeming to have the more acting expertise and comedic timing of the two.  I did enjoy their films together, the chemistry between the two quite apparent, so much so I thought they were a couple/married.  

 

3. What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code?

Eddy is very masculine and strong, while MacDonald is ever the coy and flirtatious (but not overly so) love interest.  We see them flirt and skirt around the issue of romance while not acting out, showing something I always found interesting and actually liked in regards to classic cinema - sort of a distant, non physical type of love making, one with just words and glances rather than contact.  There is something to be said for this art of hands off "love making" or wooing, which makes the end product (final culmination of the relationship) all the more satisfying at times.   Men are handsome and strong, and women are soft and emotional waiting to be rescued and taken care of by their hero.  A formula some might say archaic but I for one find romantic and endearing.   All these things seem to be in line with the Hollywood Film Code with clearly defined roles of the characters and nothing overt or blatant.

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In the first clip JM seems to be playing "hard to get."  She seems to enjoy his singing and reacts to the lyrics with delight.  He is attracted and sings his spur-of-the-moment song only to be found out he uses other names and is a convenience tool to woo women.  The second scene has JM trying to sing in a bawdy establishment.  She tries her best performing in her style the songs given to her.  When NE enters she is embarrassed or ashamed to be caught there.  Of course at his table are two women (could one of them be "Maude?").  He likes seeing JM perform and seems to be be entranced more with her.

I've seen JM in SAN FRANCISCO and enjoyed her performance.  She's classically trained and is wanted by another impresario to sing in an opera house.  The Clark Gable character, the other impresario, wants her to sing at a Barbary Coast saloon.  The scene before the quake is wonderful as sing sings the titular song, which in my humble opinion is the best interpretation of the song.

There must have been some sort if innocence in the post-code films that were attempting to demonstrate social norms and behaviors.  Gentlemen could flirt with women, but in a decent non-offensive manner.  The women must dress modestly (as opposed to the saloon singer in the tight-fitting dress).  Apparently "proper" behavior between a man and a woman had to be- in today's terms G Rated- and improper behavior happens in real life, not like in the movies.

The delightful Broadway musical A DAY IN HOLLYWOOD/A NIGHT IN THE UKRAINE has a fantastic number describing the Code; this is where I learned about the code and it was an eye opener!  Enjoy.

 

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The first thing that struck me in the canoe scene, besides the obvious flirtation/courtship between the two leads, was the way the film represent virility and what is a "desirable man". While Nelson Eddy's character tries to review his "competition" to Marie's heart, he presents a series of attributes that makes a "real man". He asks if his a banker, which may represent economic stability, he asks if he is a sportsman, which may exemplify health and physical ability. At the end we find out that it is actually and Italian tenor, which surprises Mountie Sergeant Bruce but he is willing to proof his "virility" in the only way possible in a musical, besides a dance off: singing!

In contrast to they way the treat masculinity, we find that being coy and delicate is on the top of the list of femininity. The bar scene exemplifies this because we see how uncomfortable Marie is in the dingy place. She is not willing to compromise herself physically for the sake of entertainment (for a mainly men audience) and is embarrass to find herself being seen by Sergeant Bruce in that place. 

What is really interesting is the way that both of them are worried of being part of that dual canon of what gender is, but most importantly: they both care of what the other thinks of them. This makes clear that they are willing to fit on what society sees as a couple, thus helping the studio with the code. 

I have seen this and a couple of other Jeanette McDonald's films ever since I was introduce to a recording of "San Francisco" caused by YouTube wormhole. I am a huge fan of her sense of humor and the detail she puts on her performances. Judy was right when she sang: "I'll never will forget Jeannette McDonald, just to think of her it gives my heart a pang..."     

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This couple reflects the mores of the time.  Their relationship is coy, not overt.  They play at the relationship which is very charming...and so different than today. It is more about the pas de deux than the actual consummation of the relationship.

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There seems to be a formula for the attraction sequences between Nelson's character and Jeannette's character in this movie and in the others they did together i.e. boy meets girl, girl resists, boy woos, girl gives in, happily ever after. In the end, they belong together. 

Given the code restrictions and the norms of the time, just listen to the lyrics of so many of the songs ex. "you were meant for me"," if ever you should leave me", "my love will be forever", the characters were really the songs. The songs told you how the person was feeling.

My mother remembers how mesmerizing her generation felt their voices were together. That really, more than the story. was what drew people in she thinks.

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I had not seen Eddy and MacDonald before viewing these clips, but I'm very familiar with their counterparts from Rocky and Bullwinkle. The first clip put me in mind of any of a number of comedy duos with Eddy as the straight man. He's got a marvelous deadpan face to MacDonald's more expressive face and rather sprightly dialogue. The notion that he changes the song to suit the girl he's with pushes at the boundaries of acceptable content for Hays Code era film. The audience is well aware of what he means when he says "Nothing worked with Maude." Their interactions remind me of the later screwball comedies  with pairs like Gable and Colbert and Hepburn and Grant.

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In the canoe, she seemingly has "the power" in the relationship between the two characters...interesting second clip where she meets what must have been thought of as the most debased point in life that a woman could reach, and the man looks on with pity and sympathy.  So, does this level the playing ground or does this make the man the more powerful figure.   It does certainly illustrate the lengths people were having to go to during the era of the depression. 

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Daily Dose #2:

1) I have noticed that the two characters have a playfulness between them where particularly in the first scene, they have this back and forth as to not fully admit their true feelings.  Particularly Rose Marie, does want to admit how she feels about the male character but they both seem mesmerized when they each begin to hear each other sing. In the first scene, her eyes soften as he sings, showing his softer side and vulnerability.  In the same vein, when the male character sees her showing her vulnerability as she is singing in the saloon and feeling uncomfortable, his eyes also soften.  

2) Unfortunately, although I have seen scenes from these two actors together, I don't really know their work.  I feel that it must have been interesting to try to mold these actors particular operatic talent for something as "pop" sounding as a musical which can be seen in the scene with Rose Marie, trying to adapt her singing to a more bluesy song towards the end.

3) Regarding male/female relationships, this film depicts the typical idea that men were known to "Philander" around shown in the first scene when the male character jokes about changing the name of the song to fit the woman he is trying to court.  For females, the second scene shows how woman were expected to "shimmy" and "shake", showing their bodies to garner a man's attention. What I find interesting is that in this particular scene,  the male character due to being smitten with Rose Marie, is entranced with her vulnerabilty than her appearance or sex appeal. However, the other female character who is able to show that sex appeal and take advantage of it, garners the most cheers from the crowd. 

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1. While the interactions are purposefully "distant", you can tell the attraction is in play. In the first scene Eddy is outward with his affection for MacDonald, she is the "girl of the time" to fit with the playboy character. She is clear that she won't be one of his girls. However in scene 2, it is clear that she is attracted to the Eddy character, more that she wants to convey and is embarrassed by her inability to master the crowd in the way that she is singing. She is too prim to utilize her sexuality to attract attention. 

2. This is the first Nelson Eddy, Janette MacDonald movie that I will see.

3. The norms that appear to be expected by the code are that attraction between the male/female leads is expected and normal but yet is not to be portrayed but left to the imagination.  Visible displays of emotion are not allowed but implied through dialogue and in this case the music. Sexual attraction while occurring. appears to remain virginal in the code. 

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What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples.

In the first clip, they're definitely flirting, but trying to give the other a hard time at the same time. Her with her other suitor and him with using the same song for every girl. They like each other, but are a bit apprehensive at the same time. In the second clip, the attraction is still obvious with him trying to give her sympathetic smiles and her being embarrassed about her performance. 

If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them

I know I recognize both of the names, but haven't actually seen them act before. 

What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code?

The man is the persuer and the woman is the one to win, but she still makes it difficult for him. 

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I notice that the two are definitely woooing. There is a attachment and it is implied not overt.  I saw Jeanette McDonald in San Francisco but I have not seen Nelson Eddy with any other leading lady

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1. In the first clip, Sgt. Bruce, I noticed, is doing some pretty heavy-duty flirting with Marie. Marie, on the other hand, seems to be keeping her options open, at first. She is sectetly enjoying the flirtation, but not willing to succumb to his charms just yet.  In the second clip, she runs away when she sees him watching her. I'm not sure if that was from what seems to be embarrassment or because she is trying to avoid her feelings. Probably both. 

2. I don't believe I have ever seen these actors outside of this set of movies. 

3. It seems that in this era of movie musicals, the male/female relationship was being steered in what became a very familiar occurance. Males did the "chasing" and the females "led them on" a bit until they were satisfied that the attention was true and then "succumbed" to the male charm. It has been said that life imitates art, so even Hollywood would dictate reality for regular folk. People want to be like those they admire, and there has been a long history of love for movies. People naturally did as their cinematic idols did. And thanks to Will Hays, there was a bit of religious modesty about idols' actions on screen. 

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If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them.

There is little I won't sit through, even as a curiosity simply to say I've seen it, where classic film is concerned. That said, Jeannette MacDonald's voice has always cut through my head like a knife, and I've never sat through a number much less one of her films (except "San Francisco"). The most interesting thing about her to me is her real-life longtime beard marriage to Gene Raymond & its orchestration by Louis B Mayer in a convoluted bid to preserve the the Eddy/MacDonald screen partnership.

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15 hours ago, Zea said:

In the canoe, it's obvious they're both attracted to each other, but MacDonald plays to usual character as coy and "girlish". Second clip once again they share similar emotions only this time it's embarrassment.  He's embarrassed for her because he knows SHE's embarrassed having to cheapen her performing personality to be hired. And she's embarrassed because he sees her and she knows he knows.  Confusing, yes.  But it makes sense if you follow it.

My sense is that like Astaire & Rogers the studio knew they'd found a winning combo and whether they liked it or not, Eddy & MacDonald were to be tied at the hip for the duration of their audience appeal.  Their musicals were formulaic and predictable, but I doubt depression & post-depression era audiences cared.  They just like to hear them sing.

They were safe, uncomplicated, upright & sexless (w/romantic Victorianesque flirtation &  innocent clinches) examples of Hollywood distancing itself from the immoral 'roar' of the pre-code 20's and dragging itself into the new-Puritanism of the Coded 30's. 

I haven't seen one of their movies in ages and truly had forgotten just what beautiful voices they had!

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There is interaction in the tension shown in the banter in the first clip;  she likes him but doesn't wish to show it.  He needles her about her love interest and that sets up the song, "Rose Marie".  In the second clip, he perceives her as a "good" girl and rushes to her aid.

My perception of Eddy and MacDonald was rather negative when I was a young girl.  They seemed from a time that many of us no longer wanted to embrace.  From a mature perspective, though, I find them charming and very natural in their films.  The music is beautiful!

The male/female relationship is always above board, and the virtuous girl triumphs over the "loose" one.  We see that in the coaching of MacDonald's character to sing a song in a more lively manner after being ignored by the male crowd.  Eddy's character is quick to rush to her aid. 

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We are watching Sgt Bruce and Marie becoming attracted to each other. The opera singer, Marie is a fish out of water in the establishment trying to sing a style she does not know.

I have seen all the Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy movies, and many of the movies with only one of them. Nelson Eddy said that they bickered at times on set but that they always were fond of each other.  My understanding is that they had a long off and on relationship to the end of their lives that was not public. 

I think both are good actors and love their singing. Nelson's words are easier to understand in the songs.  Their behavior in these clips and in their movies displays post code values.  However even though there is no overt sex, there are clear suggestive undertones in their movies. 

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Daily Dose of Delight #2: The Popular Charm of High Art Singers | Questions and Answers

What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples.

The first scene had song, dialogue, humor. Both are already attracted to one another but Marie doesn’t want to admit it just yet. But the detail that really struck me was that the sergeant is paddling on only one side of the canoe: They should be sailing around in circles, much like the sergeant’s attempts at romance! In the second scene, almost all of the interactions are done through eye contact, body language, and song. There’s very little actual dialogue.

If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them.

I haven’t seen these actors in anything else.

What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code?

As Sergeant Bruce looks on, she [Marie] is embarrassed to be seen on such display and chooses to leave. He admires her guts to attempt such an endeavor.” Of course, it’s okay for Sergeant Bruce to frequent this particular saloon and keep company with the one type of woman who evidently either works there or hangs out there. He can admire Marie for her attempts to fit in, but I doubt he’d admire her if she drank and really did fit in! Note how anxious he is to remove one of the women's hands from his arm when he spots Marie. Before the Hollywood code was enforced, I’m guessing that the regular who steps in to take over the entertainment would either be wearing less clothing or would be removing some of it as the show went on.

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I have never cared much for the JM/NE pictures, but this gave me a new appreciation of them. I like the focus on the interplay between them, and the actual acting as they sing. I am a fan of opera, but I prefer opera singers who can act, as opposed to those who "stand and deliver." Gradually over the past several decades there has been more acting on opera stages--I think American singers really started this. I wonder if they were inspired by the JM/NE movies (and others like Deanna Durbin)?

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16 hours ago, Dr. Vanessa Theme Ament said:
  • What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples.
  • If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them.
  • What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code?

First I have to say I am a big MacEddy fan and Naughty Marietta is my favorite movie of the decade so I am happy they're the focus of today's Daily Dose. There always seems to be a condescending or misunderstood perception  when people talk about their films from a modern day perspective that I disagree with. 

1. They have a wonderful natural chemistry and attraction for each other. Their banter in the boat about female names that don't fit the melody of the song is delivered naturally and pleasantly. They like each other, are comfortable with each other and "vibe" very well together. They both possess singing talent and for Nelson's character its a sort of hidden talent so there is a natural connection with singing. Despite them not knowing each other long (enough) Nelson sings a romantic song and compliments her though out the song which Jeanette immediately responds positively to (she smiles and swoons especially when he says "Rose Marie I love you". At first Nelson tries to figure out why she was with another man in the first place and she even sounds disinterested at the mention of him and Nelson talking about him; she's not really even paying attention to  him at that point. But her whole mood brightens up when he sings the love song to her. 

In the second clip, its about Nelson paying full attention to Jeanette, focused on her singing and expressing concern that no one is listening to her sing. Her operative voice and beauty attracts him but its also the fact she is different than the other patrons. She clearly sticks out and he feels bad for her trying to fit in with the rowdy cafe environment. No one appreciates her singing but he does. When the sexier blonde singer steps in and takes over, bringing the patrons focus back to the entertainment, he sees her trying to compete and ultimately fail. She is not like the blonde but somehow is more unique,interesting and ultimately "better". She is incapable of singing bouncy ragtime though she clearly has talent and ear for music and he's wondering what she's doing there in the first place. 

2. I haven't seen Nelson Eddy in anything besides the movies he made with her except the ones he made with Jeanette but I have listened to his performances/songs elsewhere (I really enjoy his rendition of "Old Man River") and he certainly was talented and handsome to boot. Jeanette I am more familiar with. She was one of my first Old Hollywood favorite actresses so I will always have a soft spot for her. This question is interesting because it forces me to question why I was and am a fan of hers the first place.

As I said above NM is my favorite movie from the '30s and I first saw it in high school (when I became a classic film fan). The lush romanticism and sentimentality felt unapologetic to me (they didn't care that their movies might come off as corny to some). Part of the reason why I got interested in this era to begin with was because it wasn't the 21st century. I found popculture hyper-**** and cynical and lacking in romance or emotion or sweetness and at that time as a teenager, thats what I wanted in my own life. What I found in NM and Maytime and Jeanette in particular (since she was female so I could relate to the romantic longings of her characters) was an emotional refuge and literal escape from contemporary culture, namely the images/words I was consuming or tying to emulate in popular music that depressed me. I found something and someone I could relate to because these movies seemed to "get" me and what I dreamed of or were made to appeal to a girl like me even though this was many decades and a century later. Even today "Sweetheart" from Maytime of "Ah Sweet Mystery of Life" (which I wrote out in my diary many years ago) make me feel something and connect to me like they did when I was 17. 

I am also very aware that Jeanette Macdonald was a "precode girl" as she starred in the racy Lubitsch Paramount musicals. I actually have a box set of them and watch them (One Hour With You is my favorite) and enjoy them in the context of the precode era. She's sexy and fun in a way that she isn't in the MGM oprettas with Nelson Eddy but this doesn't bother me. I'm a precode fan for sure but I do prefer the post-code movies. I admit I have a sore spot when people compare her work in both eras. The arguments always seem to be condensed or insulting towards the MacEddy movies just because they were what they were and they were basically the opposite of the precode musicals. Personal taste I understand and respect, but I take it to heart because what they're ripping apart is the the very-thing I love about those films and connect to personally-the romanticism and fantasy and sentimental sweetness. This is also the issue I have with the larger precode vs post-code debate because often it becomes put-downs and condescending or devoid of any appreciation for what the Code did right or positive.In retrospect, coming from a 2018 perspective, I can find positives about it. I notice this happening more with the MacEddy musicals that doesn't happen with the Fred and Ginger musicals and Ginger Rogers (and her post-code musicals) doesn't get condescended to or negatively perceived in the same way Jeanette Macdonald seems to which I always found interesting.

3. Its very clear that actual relationships are ideal-one guy, one girl-which involves and conforms to hetero-normative conceptions of relationships. Beyond that, individuals are supposed to give their full attention to each other and be faithful and loving to each other. On the part of the man, he is interested in her certainly romantically but also appreciates her talent and can see beyond a woman's outside beauty. His attraction isn't necessarily sexual but you can tell that's probably there anyway or could be but how they interact with each other. There aren't suggestive overtures. The "Rose Marie" song itself is full of compliments about her personality.  She is angelic, gentle and kind. he calls her a queen She has a "little devil in her eye" but its appealing and not a bad thing. 

In the second clip, Rose Marie isn't and "can't do" sexy because its not natural to her. She is poised and sings gracefully. Nelson Eddy's character is attracted partially because she isn't behaving like everyone else and especially not the other blonde singer. 

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1. I love this scene!  The moonlight, the water, the breezes blowing, and a young beautiful couple trying to figure things out.  The setting is slowly getting their blood boiling!  There is humor, a beautiful song, interesting expressions on both parties... I guess the thing that surprised me the most is the humor... good old Eddy seems like such a nice dude and yet his love song works for many names/women... Jeanette is pretty pleased that he is such a good singer...she is beginning to see that this guy has possibilities. 

 

2.

 

3.  The usual trope: good man gets the good virtuous women.  The refreshing thing is that he sees her in a very vulnerable situation and his heart goes out to her...he respects her for trying something so outside her scope.  And, of course, she is even more humiliated when she sees Eddy watching her in her time of embarrassment.  You know they've got to have a scene where things work out better for these two lovers!  Quite the startling dance from the other "dolly"!  Holy cow..where were the code enforcers that day???

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  1. What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples.
    - I noticed that in the first clip both characters were playful and they easily talk and connect through flirting and playful banter. However, the characters change by the second clip with Jeanette MacDonald acting timid and shy and reluctant to really go for the song because it's just not her style.
  2. If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them.
    - I haven't seen either actor in any other film
  3. What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code?  The man is more forward to the classy lady, but the "wilder" gal is portrayed more as a vixen compared to the sweet female character that the leading man is clearly more interested in pursuing.  I would assume that under the Hollywood Film Code it is acceptable to show the leading man being a "player" type of character, but that is not how they will portray the main female characters.   

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The main characters have the seemingly typical “I like you but I’m not going to show you that I do” reactions about them. The viewer  knows already that these two will end up together in the end but what goes on in between to get them there? Stay tuned! Also Eddy’s and MacDonald’s characters are much funnier than I had noticed/given them credit for previously.

I have seen Eddy and MacDonald in other movies, although I can’t be specific about which ones. The word “cheesy” always came to mind when thinking of them, but I think I was too hasty. I think if I saw the films now after learning about the background of them via this course I’d be kinder to them. I think I missed the nuances before.

I think these movies definitely show a sanitized version of the male female relationship and show the sharp contrast between the MacDonald good girl character and the bad girl saloon singer. Note the difference in costumes and body language.

 

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In the first scene he is clearly wooing her. She is clearly intrigued after the song, but when she hears him use the wrong name she is annoyed. Her annoyance, I think, is at herself for letting herself be sidetracked from her original goal. In the second clip things have clearly changed and she cares what he thinks about her. We as the audience see he feels for her something more than what his flippant attitude would’ve suggested earlier. 

The code keeps Rose as a straight laced damsel even in a situation where she needs money to the point she’s singing in a saloon. When she gets upstaged by the local, she tries to compete, but ultimately keeps her innocence and leaves. 

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