Dr. Vanessa Theme Ament

DAILY DOSE OF DELIGHT #2 (From Rose Marie)

432 posts in this topic

1 They are quick to judge one another, and have no physical interaction between them. They do not sing together nor dance together.

2 Have not seen any other performances by these two actors.

3 They are displayed as innocent light hearted romances with no sexaul innuendo involved. Making it to be a very clean cut and innocent fluffy relationship with no real conflict nor passions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  1. What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples.

Flirty yet distant  seems they are aloof about their attraction in the boat scene  he seems to have “ all the answers and knows what is best”  in the bar scene she almost seems embarrassed that she is seen by him  like a respectable girl wouldn’t be seen in a bar.  They both notice each other but act like they don’t  almost like a dance 

  1. If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them.

i don’t believe I’ve seen them before so I couldn’t say  

  1. What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code?

the male is dominant character , knows what’s best. The female though strong, has to eventually choose or submit to the man or her choices.  Norms are good girl bad girl as in the bar scene. She chooses not to stay because she feels he will think less of her or not respectable. Of course by him leaving, it seems he respects her. Hopefully he followed her to make sure she was ok. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. In the first in the boat, which is so chaste it squeaks, Nelson is trying to flirt (badly) and impress Jeanette. Not until she mentions an Italian tenor that she might be interested in, does Nelson feel he could compete with the guy, (I feel a song is coming!).So he sings, rather well and she's fairly impressed and surprised. He points out the use of her name, (big mistake) then she points out that he must change the name to accommodate whom ever he happens to be singing to at the time. He admits she's right. Scene is amusing, highlights his ability to sing, and cornball humor. Loved her rolling her eyes several times. In the second scene Jeanette tries to sing the only way she knows how, operatically, which just does not fit in a saloon,so she's ignored. Nelson comes in and sits at a table with two "dames" that either work there or frequent the place. Jeanette sees him and is slightly embarrassed. The manager or owner comes over to one of the dames and tells her to go on and sing. So she does, in the way it should be done in this saloon: sexy, shimmying and a sultry voice. Jeanette is further embarrassed and runs out. Nelson feels bad for her, I think, and follows her.

2. I have seen them both but don't remember the films' names. Jeanette goes on to better success than Nelson I recall. Nelson could sing but could never really relax as an actor. Jeanette did both fairly well.

3. During this era in films, most couples flirted and worked up to that first kiss. When they finally declared their love for each other the next immediate step was marriage. Boom! If there were parents to ask then they were consulted right away. The process in this era was you meet, go on a few dates, kiss once, declare love, get married, live happily ever after. fade out. The End!

That's All Folks. And we loved it!

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I loved watching both scenes and was surprised by the rawness of the exposure of the female lead. I  am loving that i can discover  how different these early musicals really were; from filming to perspectives its just really cool to see. 

In the beginning it appears the guy is a bit of a womanizer but has fallen for the beauty he is transporting. I think he likes her because shes not like other women and i think she ends of liking him because of it. I have not seen either of these two in anything before but was very surprised by the set of pipes on the main guy. If i had been sitting in that canoe i feel i would have been swooned. Did anyone else notice the canoe didn't actually go anywhere? 

Male/ Female relationships have evolved into almost unrecognizable state of being. Now a days both males and females share a variety of roles. At this time however, females were nothing more than a entertaining pretty face. I think it was sweet to see him brush off the other to girls fawning for him so that when she turned his way he could catch her eye. I like how even though she felt insecure near him she looked to him when feeling vulnerable. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1.  In the first clip, he is being very flirtatious - a real player.  She initially doesn't want to hear about it she just wants to get where she is going and he is annoying her because she has other things on her mind and is being interrupted.  His voice is what gets to her and she recognizes the quality of same.  Maybe she is double thinking about this Italian tenor of hers, whom she appears to be peeved at.  She warms up but Nelson Eddy starts listing his conquests and this isn't going to work with this lady.  In the second clip, she really doesn't belong there.  (it reminds me of Young at Heart when Frank Sinatra is playing the piano in a dive and no one is listening and dishes are clanking when he is singing One for My Baby).  In the clip it confirms that Nelson is a player however he feels sorry for the way she is being treated and realizes that she is a lady and not a one night stand.

2.  Yes, I have seen various movies with them, sometimes in movie marathons.  They are entertaining but one after the other are interchangeable of that type of movie theme.  However, as you said in yesterday's lecture, the burden on women is career or love and of course there was the dominating Louis B Mayer. I feel that Jeanette overall had a wider range in acting along with her singing.  Nelson appeared to be more stoic and regimented.  Maybe it was because it was because he was truly in love with Jeanette and hard to be doing love scenes with someone you want to marry and are in love with.  I understand he sang at her wedding, which must have been hard as well.  Possibly, a portion could be the extra stress put upon him by the studio, who ran your life at that time. You cannot hide everything from the camera.  I think it was Elizabeth Taylor who said you were considered a commodity.

3.  The code squashed so much.  I agree with Geezer noir - always good girl, bad girl.  You can touch the arm but not much else. The dress appears to be satin, shiny and did not hide any bulges...but it is long and not a strapless.  With some minor gyrations the camera does tend to move farther away or pan to include everyone else as a distraction.  Directors / camera did have a way to constantly test the code very subtly.  Pre-code would have been much different and more risqué.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  1. What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples.

Jeanette McDonald's character is a bit more lively than her usual proper lady in this scene.  She's obviously on to Nelson Eddy's clumsy attempts at flirting, and gives as good as she gets.  I did smile at her riffs on all the names in the song "specially composed" for Eddy's various targets of opportunity.

  1. If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them.

I've seen Nelson Eddy in the Claude Rains Phantom of the Opera, where he was pretty awful, I thought.  Jeanette McDonald is a real delight in an earl Ernst Lubisch film with Maurice Chevalier, less so in San Francisco.  I think she was too wedded to her ladylike image by then to make watching her much fun, especially with Gable and Tracy to compete with.

  1. What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code?

I've always had a hard time understanding the appeal of this duo.  Despite the production values lavished on their films, the just don't "pop" the way Astaire/Rogers or even Ruby Keeler and Dick Powell do.  What is says to me is that ladies fall in love with gentlemen, even if the gentlemen are from the backwoods and the lady is a member of the French court (a plot of one of their films, IIRC).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples.

The interaction between Eddy and Macdonald are almost those of forbidden lovers.  They keep their distance at all costs, and distract with humor or more distance, if words or glances are exchanged that could be interpreted as longing, or caring.  For example, in the canoe Macdonald turns around towards the end of the song and has a very pleasant look on her face, as if she's actually beginning to believe his words, then realizes her gaze and turns back around, and beings ot make jokes.  In the bar, Eddy catches Macdonalds eye as she is realizing how out of place she is, and you can see he feels for her, but instead of helping, he gets up from the table and diverts his attention. 

If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them.

Sadly, my memory and my research tell me I haven't seen Eddy or Mcdonald in a film or show.  I'm looking forward to watching some of their partnerships for the first time through TCM this week!

What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code?

It is clear the Hollywood Film Code keeps everything as assumed or understood, without actually giving an answer.  The Roaring 20s were such a time for women to be free, and for everyone to rebel against Prohibition, but the Film Code reversed all of that and put it back into the early 1900s, where everything must be covered, and all topics are taboo.  The other singer at the saloon is still more of a care-free flapper type, but one gets the feeling that those in the bar who appear to be frequent flyers, or riff-raff (drinking too much, loud, knocking over trays from the waitresses, and dancing about in skin tight clothing).  Male/Female relationships were very discrete, innocent, and naive, as if we are all 10 year olds around our first crush, with our parents watching us. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples.

Interestingly enough, Eddy and MacDonald's roles are reversed in these two scenes. In the first, MacDonald is the quiet and confident one, while Eddy anxiously performs in the hopes of gaining favor with his audience. In the second scene, it's quite the opposite. Eddy is the more confident and relaxed one, enjoying the company of others and being at ease. MacDonald, however, is very uncomfortable, failing in her attempts to capture her audience, while also feeling a sense of embarrassment.

If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them.

As my experience in the world of musicals is on a rookie level, this is the first time that I have seen and heard from the two actors.

What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code?

I can definitely see the more male-centric aspect of the times. MacDonald is portrayed as the pretty young lady, not knowing who she should be with, and having the heart that needs won over by the man. That is a theme that was very prevalent not only in the movies of this era, but in society as well. I believe that this falls right in the wheelhouse of the Hollywood Film Code, with the man having a more favorable position or image, and the woman being subservient in some ways. This would have ruffled nary a feather in those days, which is precisely what the studios were going after.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The first time I saw Rose Marie was in a Canadian Studies class in undergrad. We were discussing the cultural mythology of the Mounty and its place in Canadian society. Apparently these singing Mounty movies from the thirties did a lot to create or reinforce the stereotypical portrayal of the Canadian Mounty as an honest gentlemen who is awkward with women but always gets his man, so thanks Nelson Eddy. As a Canadian, I am always fascinated by the way our country is portrayed in American popular culture. My friends and I had a good laugh over the singing Mounty song at the beginning: "if you're the one, better run, better run away. Son you are done, throw your gun, throw your gun away" (not Oscar Hammerstein's best). The Mounty singing a love song in a canoe on a quiet lake is pretty much peak Canadiana, some myths don't die I guess.

I love 30s musicals, but I could not get into EddyMac. Personally, I found Nelson Eddy's horse to be more charming than he is in Rose Marie. I have to admit I've never developed an appreciation for the classical style of singing, I skip past his arias on Bergen & McCarthy's radio show. 

As for the male/female relationships under the code, it's funny to consider Eddy and MacDonald as a "respectable" couple considering that in real life they were having a crazy scandalous affair that turned into a nightmare for the studio and lasted through both of their marriages...allegedly. I don't think I have a point here, I just wanted to share that information with anyone who didn't know. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Daily Dose #2 Rose Marie film

Addressing the module clip...had to watch this film clip on Youtube this time of day it buffers way too much for me to see it in the module...don't know what is going on w/ that ... my signal is faster in the wee hours

Anyway, here is what I saw in the clip according to me...he (Eddy) the Mountie wants the gal (MacDonald) Rose Marie...he sings/talks his attributes & she listens without much interruption & smiles a bit here & there...at least she doesn't jump from the canoe

She really has big pretty eyes in the moonlight...in the canoe w/a handsome man who can sing though he has a job in law enforcement

He slips in the name of another girl to make her jealous I assume ...Caroline...she mentions this so it does matter to her or she would have ignored it

Voice control is wonderful & I don't know a lot about these two singers..there is a great article about them on npr & I have shared it to Twitter

Read somewhere they made 41 films together...not sure if this is true & as far as watching any of their films I'm not sure...I do not recall any though at this time ... but 41 is a lot of movies

They are famous for the song "Indian Love Call" & npr said her nick name was "Iron Butterfly"

I may add to this later if I find  a little tidbit about them or after re-watching the film clip/s

I was able to watch the second module clip... Rose Marie tries to sing for money in a tavern full of rough people making noise & drinking & paying little attention  to her...that is in her favor b/c she does not have the moves & finds it out in a few minutes when another woman shows her up ...a woman who is seated next to the Mountie who sang to her in the canoe (Eddy) he is seated in this noisy tavern between two woman..the blond is the one to show up Rose Marie 

The piano player has a face full of character & he tries to help her to no avail

The Mountie sees her struggling... she sees him see her...he feels bad for her it is all over his face how much he feels for her...he does not laugh or smile

Rose Marie tries to copy the suggestive moves of the blond woman & she cannot keep up...she gives up & leaves the tavern...the Mountie follows her outdoors

I think he is more embarrassed for her at first then she realizes this is not working in her favor & she flees ...if he didn't care for her he would have laughed at her ..he did not laugh he followed her out 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Although the characters weren't "together" as a couple in these scenes, they had a real connection. It seemed obvious that they were attracted to each other. Nelson Eddy was quite clear about that, while Jeanette MacDonald was more coy. From the start of a movie in thirties film, the audience knew there would be a happy ending. That fits very nicely with escaping from your troubles during the Depression. You can't fake chemistry, and these two had it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Dr. Vanessa Theme Ament said:

Hi again. 

I am thrilled with the activity surrounding the first Daily Dose of Delight. Here is the forum for Tuesday's.

 

Recall that you watched two clips from Rose Marie and were directed toward the performances of Nelson Eddy and Jeanette MacDonald. Look at the three questions below, as I listed them below the clip on Canvas, and post your thoughts. 

I look forward to reading your responses. Remember, this Daily Dose is a Star Studies perspective.

 

Here are a few discussion starters (though feel free to come up with your own):

  1. What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples.

In the boat scene, they never face each other. She uses her eyes a lot. She appears indifferent to him until he hits that high note, and she gently mocks his using other girls' names in the song. In the scene in the restaurant where she tries to sing, she notices him watching her and pretends to avoid his gaze. He stares at her the whole time and then follows her outside. Today, that would be almost stalkerish behavior. She tries to imitate, awkwardly, the **** girl, but can't really, because, well, she's a good girl deep down.

  1. If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them.

The only other film I remember her in was San Francisco, the big one about the big one. She was torn between the priest's idea of her and that of Clark Gable, who wanted her to work in his club. The priest wanted her to use her voice in celebration of God and is afraid Gable will corrupt her. Gable's character tries throughout the film to control her. And yet, when the disaster strikes, he panics because he thinks she's been killed in the quake. Again, she's a good girl, withstanding the sexual and professional pressure from Gable and actually turning him into a moral person at the end. For me, her voice was weak and quavery and a little too old-fashioned. Her character was too good to be true. Not a real woman at all.

  1. What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code?

Romance becomes almost de-sexualized. Good girls are uncomfortable expressing themselves in public. The goal of men is to beat their rivals in courtship. Women play hard to get. Women don't paddle canoes. Bad girls shake their hips and enjoy catcalls.

See you on TCM.

Vanessa

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The interactions and sheer charisma between the characters in these two scenes, and really any Nelson Eddy/Jeanette MacDonald pairing, is that of a natural and realistic attraction. I first saw these two remarkable actors while one day several years ago taking a chance on watching one of their movies during a TCM marathon of the pictures they did together. I had never seen an Eddy/MacDonald movie, but suddenly found myself so completely entranced by their performances that I watched several of their movies back to back that day. When the marathon was over I even felt myself yearning for more! These two had that natural spark that has you rooting for their two characters to "get together" from the moment they are first on screen together.

In the clips we saw from "Rose Marie" there are those subtle glances at one another, the uncomfortable silences, the simple embarrassed or unsure moments that are so true to the beginning of any romance that makes their scenes believable. Their relationships progress naturally and realistically. In these clips we see Eddy's character as strong, having it "together", respected, well liked, and desirable (as demonstrated by having women accompany him into the bar or his song in which he just replaces the name to suit the girl). MacDonald's character is timid, uncomfortable, inexperienced in reality, shy, unsure (as demonstrated by her uncomfortable appearance during her performance at the bar and her realization that the song wasn't written on the spot for her, but for any girl whose name fits the melody). These traits perpetuate the male/female aspects of relationships that we see so commonly throughout motion picture history in which the man is the supportive, dominating, more worldly character while the woman is meek, in need of a man's support, inexperienced.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the first clip was in real life, they would be interrupted by those blasted blackflies (ask any Canadian). 

I have heard in real life, Eddy and MacDonald often feuded, yet their chemistry works perfectly in the films. 

1. The way Eddy tries to court MacDonald is very old-fashioned and proper, and screams post Code. MacDonald does not seem interested in Eddy as she's on a mission for reasons not involving love. Eddy seems to be working his charms on her until he starts mentioning other names. MacDonald appears to interpret this as past lovers of Eddy's and the mood is broken. (I almost expected her to jump out of the canoe and swim to shore)

In the second clip, MacDonald learns the hard way about what kind of audiences she is performing for. She is used to performing for cultured city people in opera houses and is completely out of place in a saloon. (and the songs she sings are not meant for opera divas) 

The brash, bawdy dame easily handles "Some of These Days", and MacDonald tries to imitate her but quickly realizes she is a GOOD GIRL, not a GOOD TIME GIRL and flees. 

2. I have seen MacDonald with Maurice Chevalier in "The Merry Widow" and I find Chevalier was better than Eddy with his vivacious personality. He was more of the playboy type that MacDonald "tames". I have listened to Eddy on old time radio programs and find him too stuffy. (and cringe at his versions of "Shortnin' Bread" and selections from "Porgy and Bess")

3. Eddy is being a stereotypical Mountie, wanting to get his man (or woman, in this case). The man always does the courting and not the other way around. The Code was also eliminating any sexual references to ensure Eddy and MacDonald behaved properly. The saloon scene showed us that you may not fit in singing your way, but you must remain pure and virtuous....a lady has her reputation to think of, you know. (and if it were pre-code, perhaps some drunk would think he was at a burlesque show and yell "TAKE IT OFF!!")

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  1. During the first scene, she is being to have feelings towards him and in the second scene she is embarrassed and also upset because of her interactions with the crowd and his entrance with other women at his side.
  2. This is actually my first time seeing these two on screen together but I would like to see more!
  3. In the end, all will be well and their relationship won'thave many issues. It's almost like a fairy tail where there is always a happy ending. We all know that isn't always how life works. More escapism from Hollywood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1) In the rowboat scene we witness and early courtship between a coy yet empowered women and a possible gentleman caller. Eddy jokes w/ MacDonald about the man she is hurrying off to see. Eddy finds out what his real job is and then proceeds to "show off" to MacDonald. Near the end of the tune MacDonald shows a spark of interest in Eddy by smirking a bit; he had definitely caught her attention. The sophisticated yet romantic chemistry between 2 characters makes for the development of a perfect couple.

In the saloon scene you can easily see how uncomfortable and embarrassed MacDonald is trying to sign her little operatic heart out to room full of rowdy drunks. As soon as Eddy walks it she takes note of him right away.  As she bashfully tries to hit the notes, Eddy instantly notices her.  As his one friend notices that she's struggling, she makes her way up to the piano in her skin tight dress and begins to belt out the tune overpowering MacDonald and capturing the attention of the crowd. Embarrassed, MacDonald leaves. Recognizing her humiliation, Eddy then gets up from the table and goes after her. This goes to show the evolution of these 2 character's relationship and how it is maturing to different level.

2) I am fairly new to classic musicals that I have not personally seen them in another film together but they are a truly perfect pair.

3) The sweet, romantic admiration these 2 have together perfectly describe the majority of male/female relationships during that era. Post code allowed for courtship on a more personal, less sexual level. Words and song were more emphasized then physical looks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  1. What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples. They are both attracted to each other, but she is playing hard to get. Like the way  she teases him about the interchangeable name in the song. She was still flattered she just refused to show it.She may not know at this point that she is attracted to him but she is. 
  2. If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them. I have seen them in other films together. 
  3. What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? It would appear that you have your good girl vs the bad girl. You can be the bad girl that runs around has lots of fun and is popular but that will not get you a husband. Or you can be the good girl just trying to make a life and end up with a good husband and life.
  4. What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code? Look but don't touch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In regards to the Production Code in effect at the time, I was a little surprised by the shimming and suggestive movements of Gilda Gray and how they got away with it during that time period. While MacDonald was the perfect lady.  LOL

I had to watch Nelson Eddy and Jeanette MacDonald in school. At the time I was about ages 6-10.  I have to be honest I totally hated it...we would make so much fun of their singing.  HOWEVER...as I have grown older I have developed a greater appreciation of their movies.  And though their type of music may not be my favorite they had wonderful voices!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In these clips,  Jeanette is out of her element in the wilds of rural Canada, but Eddy, playing a Mountie, is quite comfortable in this setting. Obviously, he enjoys pursuing women, but doing so with relatively innocent song and talk, and not much else.   Eddy is the bolder character, he expresses his admiration for Jeanette freely and openly.  She is reticent to respond to him, except to admire his voice.

Their screen characters seem to reflect their actual personalities.

Sex as expressed by mingling of the big voices is definitely a safe method of stimulating an audience.   The ending of Rose Marie must have been impressive in the theater, an enormous close-up of a kiss. Eddy's feet are on the floor.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 #TWhat do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples.
If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them.
What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code?CMusical
What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples.
1) first scene inferences were very suttle . Also extremely
Proper. Second scene showed more sexual innuendo with the bar scene which was opposite to Ms McDonald as if to make a comment about morals

If ilm Code?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  1. What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes?
  2. What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era?

For me the answers to these two questions are intertwined - Nelson Eddy's character is depicted as a Canadian Mountie - a symbol of male strength and virtue.  Even when he hints at being a lothario ("Nothing worked with Maude") it rings hollow.  Jeanette MacDonald's character, when she allows her facial expressions to give her away, evinces a desire to be cared for, and perhaps rescued.  In the second scene, Eddy seems prepared to oblige, initially content to keep company with another women (with whom he seems singularly out of place - see "lothario" comment) until he sees MacDonald faltering in her performance.  His facial expression shows care and concern for MacDonald, not coincidentally being depicted as the more demure of the two performers.  Keeping with the depression-era overtone that all will work out for the best, these two scenes portend that MacDonald and Eddy will end up together, as they should, and in spite of their respective circumstances.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  1. What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Please give specific examples.
  • They are both attracted to each other.  He sings about her in the canoe.  She sees him come in while she tries to attract the crowd but to no avail.  He sees how she reacts when the other singer comes forward and takes the spotlight.  
  1. If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them. 
  • N/A  I may have, but I have only heard about Jeannette MacDonald in the beginning of San Fransico sung by Judy Garland.  Go figure!  LOL!
  1. What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationships as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect are supported under the Hollywood Film Code?
  • It is interesting to watch the play, back and forth in the canoe scene.  It sure would not play out that way today.  Reserved and old-school charm to impress the girl.  Also, the shyness and embarrassment when MacDonald's character is outshined by the sassy voluptuous showgirl and her moves.  She shied away, embarrassed and then Nelson Eddy's character felt bad for her.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched “Rose Marie” today and it was my first Jeanette MacDonald-Nelson Eddy movie. I loved the interaction between them! The chemistry was great. Nelson Eddy’s serenate in the first clip was one of my favorite scenes, and I particularly liked the moment where they start singing other names instead of “Rose Marie”. I thought they were funny and adorable.

This was my first Nelson Eddy movie ever, but I’ve seen Jeanette before. I love her because of her movies with Maurice Chevalier, where she is beautiful and with a great personality as always! She’s becoming one of my favorites for sure.

And the male/female relationships in this era are very interesting, at least from my point of view. The relationship is always more “correct” than in Pre-Codes, with the characters always keeping their distance. But at the same time, it’s playful and very suggestive in a more discrete kind of way, so it’s very entertaining to watch! ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I noticed that the characters seemed to stay apart but showed that they were interested in each other. As in the scene when they were in the canoe they were seated apart, but looked at one another. In the second scene they made eye contact but didn't touch or say anything to each other.

It seemed that in all the movies that they were in together they were very polite and did not show a lot of emotions.

It seems that once the code was put in to effect that the actors and actress did not have much touching and love making in the scene.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us