Lover-o-Classics

Buddy Ebsen

14 posts in this topic

For anyone who grew up watching 'The Beverly Hillbillies' and 'Barnaby Jones' back in the 60's and 70's, you'll want to watch for Buddy Ebsen dancing in some of the old 30's musicals... including 'Broadway Melody of 1936' and 'Born to Dance', on TCM today.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Although I don't much care for most of the slap stick silliness of the early musicals it's always fun seeing people like Buddy Ebsen and Joan Blondell (first known to me in Here Come the Brides) in their younger days. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I noticed when I was setting my DVR and checking out the cast that Buddy was in a few. I loved Buddy Ebsen; I sometimes wonder what Wizard of Oz would have been like if he hadn't been allergic to the silver makeup for Tin Man. 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, KarenLucille said:

Yes, I noticed when I was setting my DVR and checking out the cast that Buddy was in a few. I loved Buddy Ebsen; I sometimes wonder what Wizard of Oz would have been like if he hadn't been allergic to the silver makeup for Tin Man. 

I've thought about that too.

Recently I was watching a 1973 episode of Barnaby Jones. There's a scene where he's investigating a murder (of course) and he sees a witness doing some dance steps with someone. He says he never could learn how to dance right. The smile on Ebsen's face while saying this line clearly indicated he was having fun with the in-joke, since of course he had started as a dancer in Hollywood decades earlier.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

I've thought about that too.

Recently I was watching a 1973 episode of Barnaby Jones. There's a scene where he's investigating a murder (of course) and he sees a witness doing some dance steps with someone. He says he never could learn how to dance right. The smile on Ebsen's face while saying this line clearly indicated he was having fun with the in-joke, since of course he had started as a dancer in Hollywood decades earlier.

I love those inside jokes. One of my favorites was an episode of Happy Days when Mr. and Mrs. C went to see The Music Man. They're outside the theater looking at the movie poster and Mrs. C says "Oh, Howard, the little boy looks just like Richie at that age." I'm sure not everyone got watching that episode got it. :)

  • Like 6
  • Haha 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Saw him in in one of Tuesday's films and thought he was a bit creepy.  Maybe it was the facial expression, or overdone gangliness (6' 3")  like Tommy Tune (6'6").  Liked him better in Captain January (1936) with Shirley Temple and a more elaborate routine. 

 

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To Pastiche:  Never saw this before.  What a fabulous routine... and what an amazing little hoofer! (...no, not Buddy, though he was good too.)   A thoroughly enjoyable number.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/5/2018 at 7:47 AM, BlueMoods said:

I love those inside jokes. One of my favorites was an episode of Happy Days when Mr. and Mrs. C went to see The Music Man. They're outside the theater looking at the movie poster and Mrs. C says "Oh, Howard, the little boy looks just like Richie at that age." I'm sure not everyone got watching that episode got it. :)

I missed that one. But I remember (when show was new!) the Happy Days episode of Robin Williams doing Mork--as it was a spinoff of Happy Days--and Mork turns on TV as Richie is leaving living room. The TV starts playing the Andy Griffith theme and Mork says, "I like that little boy Opie!"

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We were watching Born to Dance today and talking about Buddy Ebsen.  I think he'd have made a better Scarecrow than Tinman, given his loose way of dancing.  Don't think the man had leg bones.

 

L.

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It amazes me when ever I see a young Buddy Epsen sing and dance.  He was such a handsome man in his youth but such a gawky looking dancer.  Even though he was a good dancer.  I can’t help but wonder how his career would have gone if he wasn’t allergic to the silver makeup for the tin man costume.  He of course became a great tv actor later in life.  Was it true he was black listed during the House on American Activities era?  Does anyone know?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yankee Doodle Dandy is one of those film that I like and dislike simultaneously.

I like it: for the rare opportunity to see James Cagney singing and dancing his heart out  for Walter Huston who was  great all the time in all kinds of roles,  for Cohan's fun songs.

I dislike it for the sappy and just-too-cute dialogue, i.e. "My wife never missed a curtain in her life." The fawning over Cohan is excessive, and Cagney plays him as too nice all the time. 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/7/2018 at 9:51 PM, Lisa D. said:

We were watching Born to Dance today and talking about Buddy Ebsen.  I think he'd have made a better Scarecrow than Tinman, given his loose way of dancing.  Don't think the man had leg bones.

 

L.

Funny, as I thought the same about Buddy being a better Scarecrow when watching Born to Dance. I went searching and found he in fact was originally cast as the Scarecrow and Ray Bolger as the TinMan, but Ray really wanted the Scarecrow so they switched! I'd say early on since no makeup mishap yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Debbie Kerrick - I read that Buddy turned down a 7-year contract from MGM & they were the ones who blackballed him. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us