Dr. Vanessa Theme Ament

DAILY DOSE OF DELIGHT #3 (FROM THE LOVE PARADE)

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  1. The director's touches include plot-driving props which are small details (garter, gun)  are given close-ups rather than people's faces. The audience already knows what will happen and the results. They are not fooled into thinking the wife is dead. So, the director brings the audience into the farce of the situation, which makes it funnier. Also, much of the dialogue in this scene is untranslated and for good reason. A cuckold husband and his unfaithful wife need no translation. This also heightens the irony and, therefore, comedy of the situation.
  2. The most important sound is the gun since it serves several purposes. The gun is symbolically phallic and in the scene, the gunshot changes what could become tragedy into farcical comedy.  The sound itself breaks the murderous intent of the husband with his Snidely Whiplash mustache. He becomes the buffoon, which plays off Chevalier's debonair mystique.
  3.  Themes presaged here include love triangles that end a battle of the sexes with audience-satisfying marriage and/or readjustment of relationships between worthy opponents, stereotyped characters (oversexed, charming male getting his comeupance from a witty female [equalizing male-female dominance), collusion by the social lower class which makes buffoons of the wealthy, double entendres (both visual and verbal), and, in other films, music and choreography which allows risque elements but muted to fit code.
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What a fantastic clip. I absolutely love this movie. You can see what kind of character Chevalier plays, adulterer, frivolous fun loving etc. One part in the scene that, for me expresses the character he plays. When trying to zip up her dress the husband is having a difficult time and then she walks over and his character is finished with the task in a second; “voila!”.

Also when he puts the prop gun into the drawer and there are numerous others, it’s plain to see what kind of a life and character he is playing. Simply great!

The Lubitsch “touch” is beautiful and shows a fun loving quirkiness about the movie, from the garter to the gun. His sense of minute detail shows the style and knowledge he has as to what will make the audience enjoy the film. The flow of his movies are so effortlessly perceived and makes for an escape anyone can take part and enjoy during those tough depression years. 

I can’t wait to see the next film he masters in the lineup. 

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1.  The scene sets up Alfred as a likable roué.  The garter was evidently left over from his last tryst.  His pistol collection is further evidence of previous trysts.  His casual statement that she's jealous and his smile as he discovers that the gun is loaded with blanks reveal his light-hearted approach to life.  His charming smile, contrasted with the husband's scowl, endears him to us.  How many men, when caught by the woman's wife, would smile and react so casually?  The outfits that the three of them wear establish that they belong to the wealthy class.  

2.  The first thing I noticed is that we did not need to be told that we are in France.  The French dialog took care of setting the place.  So we are taken to a place that had not been affected by the Great Depression.  Interestingly, much of the dialog is in French, and (to many of us) it might as well be a silent film with occasional title cards for the few English phrases.  The story is told not so much with dialog, but visually.  The part that I enjoyed most was the moment when Alfred and husband discover that the gun was loaded with blanks.  Without any dialog, and communicating to us as they might have done in a silent film, we learn that this is not her first "suicide."

3.  The focus on the upper class and their relatively frivolous problems is a theme that runs through depression era musicals and comedies.  As well as transporting the audience to a place where money is not a concern.

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I love this scene! Everything from the props, the sound, the dialogue is so well integrated, giving us a story from the very beginning. I particularly liked the the reactions vis a vis the garter (and she has both of hers!) and Maurice Chevalier's little 'oops' face. The look upon her face as it is discovered the gun has no bullets is priceless! It has a lighthearted touch and I liked the clip.

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1. The garter she comes out with and him insisting that it is her's , then she lifts her skirt as proof shows that he is a ladies man. The guns on the drawer shows that he is not sweet and innocent as he appears. I think the fact that he was able to easily do her dress up goes to show that he has had plenty of experience in doing and undoing ladies dresses.

2. I loved the gun shot, the movement of his handkerchief in his pocket then him patting down to see if he was shot. It adds more humor to the scene and it shows the length the woman was going to go to get out of the sticky situation she was in.

3.  I enjoyed the humor of the scene. In that day and age life was hard and there probably wasn't much to laugh about. I think this movie and others like it use humor so the audience an forget how bad life is for a little while.

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Lubitsch touches include attention to detail of the accessories:  cane, hankies, etc. and the photos of the dressing table.  The dialogue makes use of asides to the audience, dark humor in the situation, and sexy undertones.   The husband thinks he is killing his wife's lover only to discover the gun doesn't work.   I liked the drawer full of guns for all occasions, and the gigolo having to zip the dress because the bumbling husband couldn't do it!

In the sound department, I notice a few important sounds such as gunshot, steps, etc., but was really most aware of the silence between scenes.  I think films and television of today overdo the sound, distracting from the story, and the silence here felt welcome and let you process what you saw.

The themes of Depression era films are apparent:  lavish surroundings, escapades of the well-to-do, and a humorous put down of their morals and trivial pursuits.  The audience could feel superior and enjoy the escape.

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1. Alfred (Chevalier) and the woman fight like lovers not as a husband and wife. The woman is very jealous as Alfred informs us. She has found another woman's garter in his bedroom. "Aha," she says!" and they quarrel. But for Alfred the quarrel is a familiar one. So familiar that his dog doesn't stir from his nap on the settee. In fact, the dog doesn't even open an eye at the goings on.This fact is further borne out by Lubitsch's shot of the many pistols and women's fancies in Alfred's desk drawer. He has been down this road many times before. Alfred is a serial womanizer. 

One other thing quite noticeable is Alfred's playful deameanor. Life is a party one must enjoy. Damn tradition and societal boundaries. He is very handsome, beautifully attired and very suave with definite military bearing. Contrast him to his lover's husband, old, balding, ruffled, overly serious and a bit cuckold. The audience's sympathy is not with the harmed party, the husband, rather it is with the dashing Alfred.

2. The sounds are very crisp, the firing of the gun, the slamming of the doors. They seem to be over emphasized therby downplaying other more mundane sounds such as walking, struggling, etc. I can only guess that perhaps Lubitsch did this purpousely to keep the tension of the scene and the audience's focus on the dilemma playing out.

As I do not speak or understand French I can only guess at the words but the actor's mannerisms and expressions and our own imaginations provide us with the gist of the scene.

The one word of dialogue that jumps out at me is when Chevalier says, "Voilá!" after zipping up the wife's dress. Something her husband was unable to do.

In just this one word we learn so much about his character. He is definitely a Lothario, a charming and rakish libertine. He is saying to the husband, "See, this is how it's done. Pardon, but it is so easy to please your wife...any woman." He is the professor of seduction and the husbands are the bumbling students in need of Chevalier's guidance.

3. An early scene strongly depicting the main character/s personality and proclivities thereby laying the groundwork for the films premise to play out. Perhaps more of this seemingly unattainable man who doesn't believe in love only lust setting up the friction when the, "right" woman comes along. We see it at a Production Code level in "Top Hat" with Astaire singing and dancing to the song, "No Strings I'm Fancy Free" at the beginning of that movie as Lubitsch does in, "The Love Parade."

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Although the dialog was in French, we could follow the scene by the props and the staging. The very loud "pop" of the gun drew a crowd, the door handle jiggling added suspense, the second "pop" of the gun and the cheeky grin of Chevalier. When he returned the gun to the drawer, it implied that this scene had been played out before. The garter and the zipping of the dress were a hint of a sexual nature, while the gun was a bit scandalous.

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54 minutes ago, Earthshine said:

1.     What do you notice about the Lubitsch touch? How do the props, the dialogue, and the staging help you understand the character of Alfred (Maurice Chevalier)?

First, I noticed a carryover of some silent film techniques in this clip.  More specifically, I noticed the close-ups on the garter, the handbag and gun, and the contents of the drawer.  Granted, more contemporary films also include similar close-ups.  But too often, today’s “innovative” directors create a more frenetic pace, by not focusing on any image for more than 2-3 seconds.  In earlier films, more specifically silent films, directors and actors needed to tell the story by focusing on props that played a key role in a scene and by conveying the story through actions and facial expressions.  All of these elements were at work in this scene, especially with Chevalier displaying his cavalier attitude while addressing the audience, while arguing with his mistress, and when confronting her jealous husband.  I was also reminded of some of Hitchcock’s earlier films with the camera shot of the people in the street as they react to the gunshots.  Chevalier also displays his cavalier attitude about his behavior and affairs when he reacts to being “shot” with great animation and when he zips up his mistress’s dress.  He is very smug when he looks at her husband while zipping the dress as if to say he knows his wife better—and more intimately—than her own husband does.

2.     Based on this scene, what are some of the things you notice about the scene’s use of sound? Describe a specific sound or line of dialogue you hear and what you think it adds to the scene’s effectiveness.

Similar to a silent film, the characters are using quite a bit of dialogue, which the audience might not understand or “hear,” unless they speak French.  However, like a silent film, the audience does not necessarily need to understand the dialogue because the ideas are very evident through the props and characters’ actions.  The audience is introduced immediately to the conflict and tension as we hear the characters arguing behind closed doors, setting what we assume will be a serious tone, until Lubitsch introduces the juxtaposition of humor with the tension of the gunshots, the apparent suicide, and the failed homicide.  And despite the tension between Chevalier and his mistress and his mistress and her husband, the mood is lightened with the dialogue.  Alfred has engaged in similar acts in the past and he will continue to do so, despite his plea that the stories of his past are exaggerated.

3.     What themes or approaches might you anticipate from this clip in other Depression-era musicals?

It seems that directors and writers at the time wanted to keep the mood light, despite some more serious elements in a storyline, at least in this film with the affair, the confrontation, and the assumed suicide.  Despite these elements, the scene ends on a positive note and there is an under lying current of humor throughout the entire scene.  As was the case with the film clips from Rose Marie, it seems that this film addressed a double standard present at that time, and still present to some degree even today.  It seemed acceptable for men to objectify women, viewing them as cast away conquests.  But this film also seems to fit the notion that people during that era went to the theater to seek a brief respite from their otherwise harsh lives, living vicariously through the characters they aspired to be living lives they wished they had, instead of being reminded of the harsh realities beyond the darkened theater and images that offered them hope.

It is an interesting way to begin a musical.  A comic scene that is essentially a silent movie giving way to a serious scene with dialogue.  It reminds me of the opening of Tom Jones.

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1. What do you notice about the Lubitsch touch? How do the props, the dialogue, and the staging help you understand the character of Alfred (Maurice Chevalier)?

Even if one doesn’t understand the language, it’s still very easy to understand what’s going on. There is the garter that shows why the woman is upset – there are other women involved with the man, the other guns in the desk that shows that it’s not the first time Chevalier deals with a similar situation and the struggle with the zipper that tells us the difference between him and the husband. Chevalier has had practice zipping up women’s dresses during all his affairs while the husband isn’t as used to helping ladies with their clothes.  

2. Based on this scene, what are some of the things you notice about the scene’s use of sound? Describe a specific sound or line of dialogue you hear and what you think it adds to the scene’s effectiveness.

The scene is highly enhanced by the use of sound. The dialogue is in French except for a few words spoken in English that clues the viewers in on what’s happening. There is the rattling of the doors that shows that someone is about to walk in on them and some actions are muted, like when Chevalier pulls out the drawer and puts the gun inside. All you hear is the dialogue between the husband and wife.

3. What themes or approaches might you anticipate from this clip in other Depression-era musicals?

The concept of wealthy people’s problems and playboys, and giving the audience an opportunity to make fun of the rich and that the film is set in high society.

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The scene of Paulette's husband walking toward Alfred with rhe gun was more like a silent film than a "talkie". There was background music, but no words are spoken, no sound effects, etc. 

When Paulette shoots herself, it seems as though the sound of the shot was delayed, leading me to believe it was edited in after-the-fact.  

I know I have seen other films where Chevalier spoke to the audience and i now want to go search them out to see who directed. ?

Other themes that occur throughout Depression era musicals are the implied sex or sexual relationship without it being obvious,  and the comedic scenes (some a bit slapstickish). 

 

 

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To compare this scene to a current film, although it's definitely not a musical comedy, "A Quiet Place" utilizes the contrast between deep silence and sound much in the same way this clip does. During the moments of quiet, the audience is forced to focus on what the director explicitly wants us to see, even seemingly purposeless scenery gains potential weight. Where the filmmakers of "A Quiet Place" use this technique to enhance feelings of horror, Ernst Lubitsch and his sound designers orchestrate the quiet/loud interplay to guide the audience through comedic beats, much like how a theatrical director would. 

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Q1) The Lubitsch touch seems everywhere in this clip.  The garters, the gun(s), and even the dog seems to be a prop to show some sense of normalcy yet the absurdness of the situation Alfred finds himself in at this moment.  The whole set up is designed to show that Alfred is a man of leisure who prefers to be a playboy versus the attache of Sylvenia.  I knew before he opened the drawer to put the gun away, there would be more guns as he clearly seems to be a man who attract feminine attention and draws up the jealousy among the ladies.

Q2) The pop of the gun almost didn't sound real to me each time it was fired.  It sounded like it was from a larger weapon versus the small ladies gun it was.  The scattering of the crowd and the crowd was interesting in that it seemed all of Paris knew of his exploits and they all were waiting outside to see what was going to happen to Alfred this time.

Q3) I think the touches of opulence will be everywhere.  Showing people living ordinary yet extravagant lives helped movie goers forget the real world for a short time.  These movies were designed to show that the world was still moving forward and at some point, just the movies, all this might be a dream as well and one could hope for better things to come.

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1. I don't speak French, so it all seemed very serious hearing the argument from the closed room.  Then Maurice opens the door, looks at the audience and with a laugh makes his comment in English to us.  And the woman reacts to his words!  This made me laugh and changed the tone of the picture for me right away.  I knew it would be fun and Maurice would be a fun character.  The drawer full of guns, I guess, shows how many similar situations he has been in and is also very funny.  Maurice breaking the 4th wall reminded me of George Burns or Groucho, letting the audience in on the inside joke.

After the husband fires and Maurice "searches for the wound, it's hilarious and then we look at the wife and she has this great look on her face as if she is looking at two buffoons.  It is wonderful!

2. Good use of the sound when the husband rattles the door to get in the room, and again funny when Maurice tells us who it is.  Also sound of the crowd outside the after the gunshot when Maurice opens the French Doors. We saw people running in the exterior shot (which surprised me) , now we hear them below his window.

3.  The butler pointing to the ambassador and then getting caught was also very funny.  Then saying to the ambassador that the reports were exaggerated while flipping the garter in his hand were more great touches.   I look forward to seeing the whole film.

Great stuff!

 

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The Lubitsch Touch in 'The Love Parade' is outstanding! The scene has you hooked when the woman comes out holding a garter and is 'chewing out' Chevalier and wanting to know whose garter it is. Chevalier is trying to appease the woman by saying it was hers but she shows him it's not. What is a jealous woman to do when her lover is cheating on her...go for her gun and shot him! Just as she is about to commit a crime of passion, in walks in her husband. What to do...shot yourself!! You're drawn into this funny but 'tragic' scene as the husband confronts his wife's lover and tries to kill him but come to find out the gun was EMPTY! You go from jealousy, to fury, to revenge, and back to comedy all seamlessly edited..that's The Lubitsch Touch! Effortless editing, great action and reaction.

 

From the time Chevalier opens the door and turns to the camera and says "She's terribly jealous" you hear the woman yelling at him, you know she is going to come out like hell on wheels at him because she's found something that ain't hers. It's like you are eavesdropping in on the middle of lovers quarrel and you want to know what started it all. You are being 'revved up' for a fight and ready to take sides..while all the long wanting to see the 'battle' between to two. Now you're hooked and want to know what's next..

 

My anticipation of Depression Era Musicals are that there always seem to be a confrontation. Whether it's between lovers, siblings, or friends there always seems to be something pitting one against the other. You are going through an horrific event (The Depression) and you want to escape from it by watching someone else in a more terrible situation. The movies become your fantasy world and everything there may start out bad but always ends happy. You want that for yourself. You want to know that the sun will shine again, happiness is around the corner and all will be right again. Escapism...plain and simple. To me that's all what people back then (and now) wanted...just to escape and move onto happiness and what better way than thru a Musical.

 

 

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1 - Lubistch was a very criative director, he uses the craziest tricks in scenes of this movie, the simulation of a murder, exagerated performances, this we see in a silent movie and he set in this scene.

2 - Stands out the fact they speak french in one time, I add also the french accent mixed with english.

3 - Delightful movies, whose people watch to forget issues  they spend at the time.

 

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This scene was so much fun--I loved the emphasis the props brought to the rakish nature of the character. The gun for example--when you see him put her gun in a drawer filled with little guns you know that Maurice Chevalier's character has done this many, many times before. And then when he zips up his lover's zipper and says 'voila'--you learn so much about him. He is so casual and familiar with the situation.

Instead of showing the argument at the beginning, the audience hears it through the doors, forcing you to feel that you are eavesdropping. This becomes even more pronounced when the fourth wall is broken, and you feel like a voyeur. This is so interesting--a way of getting the scandal of the situation across without really saying anything. 

I think a lot of code-era musicals still have hints of naughtiness, but they are much more discreet, and what is said has to be gently implied rather than stated outright. Also, there has to be consequences for this kind of infidelity--nobody gets to just get away with it. Alfred is recalled to his fictional country, and his lover is caught by her jealous husband.

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1. What do you notice about the Lubitsch touch? How do the props, the dialogue, and the staging help you understand the character of Alfred (Maurice Chevalier)?

The start of the clip with someone arguing in the other room. Them Maurice comes out smiling talking to the audience. In a short period of time he establishes that Maurice is a rogue. He’s having this torrid affair and is being accused of having another affair. Lubitsch uses the garter and the drawer full of guns to establish the character of Maurice. Then the bit where the husband tries to shoot him and then he helps the husband figure out the gun isn’t loaded. So we are made to feel that maybe Maurice is not such a bad guy. Another special touch is Maurice fastening her dress when her husband couldn,t!

2. Based on this scene, what are some of the things you notice about the scene’s use of sound? Describe a specific sound or line of dialogue you hear and what you think it adds to the scene’s effectiveness.

I wasn’t really aware of the sound until I viewed it the second time. Then I realized that the scene is started with just the sound of voices which start off low because they are behind closed doors. Then The lady’s get louder, the madder she gets  and the sound of the gun shot is really loud. Then more door rattling when the husband comes in, but the first time you hear any music is when the husband confronts Maurice. The music accelerates the tension. Then you hear another gunshot. Then no sound as they discover the gun has blanks and that the wife is alive. I thought his use of music and sound really set the scene along with his clever visuals.

3. What themes or approaches might you anticipate from this clip in other Depression-era musicals?

Many of the films of this era show care free rich people. They live in huge apartments and always seem to be dressed in formal attire. I assume that it was allowing the audience to escape from the hardship of the depression.

I have never seen Love Parade but this clip makes me want to view it!

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1- By allowing the Alfred to break the 4th wall, Lubitsch involves the audience in the process - rather than being mere observers, we’re almost “friends and confidantes” of the character.   I’m not familiar with Lubitsch’s work, but from this clip I would assume his “touch” includes portraying characters as urbane and witty - perhaps likeable but flawed.

2 - The drawer full of guns is certainly a clue to Alfred’s roguish nature and what we might expect from him in later scenes.   I found the use of French in the scene interesting.  When combined with the visual expressions of Alfred, Paulette and her husband, I saw it almost as a bridge between silent films and the new use of sound.  

3-  The gunshot was completely unexpected and - much like the aside at the start of the clip - captured the attention of the audience.  I would think it rather a new sound for audiences in a movie theatre.

4 - Here is a great example of the idle rich being made to look a bit foolish:  Paulette is happy to cheat on her husband, to ridicule him and call him names but still he clings to her.  Alfred isn’t at all sorry for what he’s done, only that he was caught.  I think this theme helped audiences of the time escape, for a short time at least, their every day lives.

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1.  Humor, class, and sexuality abound in the typically-Lubitsch scene.  One of the funniest elements is that I thought at first the woman was Chevalier's jealous wife, but--while she WAS jealous of whoever had owned that garter--we learn that it's the woman's husband banging on the door (implying that she too was cheating with Chevalier)!

2.  The 2 gunshots make us realize that's it's a real gun really firing (bringing drama to the comedic, sexy scene).  We learn later, of course, that it wasn't loaded!

3.  I think Chevalier's attitude of "I can calmly get through this seemingly-disastrous situation" would have been very appealing to Depression-era audiences (and was used by artists from Fred Astaire to Shirley Temple).

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1.  What do you notice about the Lubitsch touch? How do the props, the dialogue, and the staging help you understand the character of Alfred (Maurice Chevalier)?

     I noticed, first the pre-code elements (the garter belt and particularly the subject matter). Being pre-code, Lubitsch could get away with exploring such a theme and using the devices found in this scene. From the very beginning of the scene, you know that Alfred is a philanderer/womanizer with little, if any, convictions about his sexual habits.

2.  Based on this scene, what are some of the things you notice about the scene’s use of sound? Describe a specific sound or line of dialogue you hear and what you think it adds to the scene’s effectiveness.

     Based on the sound, the first thing I notice about it is the fact that the gunshot is so quiet and yet it brings the people in the street to gather in front of the house. Obviously, the sound techniques had need of developement.      I also appreciate how Alfred speaks English to the audience and to the inspector (and vice-versa) but but both he and the married couple speak French to one another.

3.  What themes or approaches might you anticipate from this clip in other Depression-era musicals?

     I like how the theme here is one of considerable conflict which draws me in from the very beginning. What I’ve noticed about several musicals (both from this era and from the subsequent eras as well) is that they rarely have a truly engaging conflict that grabs your attention and doesn’t let go until the very end of the film. Don’t get me wrong, there are plenty of musicals out there that I love dearly, but others have momentary conflicts that hold one’s interest but then lose that momentum as the film progresses.

 

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1.  What I've noticed about the Lubitsch touch is that coming from the silent era to sound, he still uses props in place of dialogue

but still conveys what we need to understand about the scene.  Lubitsch Chevalier is a lothario - he has a collection of guns and garters from women past.

The gun scene had little dialogue, a few words and two gun shots but we could

could understand she was angry about his two-timing, she was caught two timing but shot herself, the husband was angry and wanted to

kill Chevalier's character.  The props, facial expressions and timing between the characters gave a shocking scene of murder with comedy.

2. I didn't have to know French to understand two people fighting, their tone made it obvious.  The silence between characters heightened the suspense and tension of the scene.

3. Another happy go lucky bachelor.  A rich couple unhappy but find they love each other after a horrible event.  All well that ends well.

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What do you notice about the Lubitsch touch? How do the props, the dialogue, and the staging help you understand the character of Alfred (Maurice Chevalier)?

I find it interesting in this scene that the props quite literally turn out to be just that - props used by Alfred in this escapade which has apparently happened many times before (as is shown when we see the drawer full of garters and revolvers). The close-ups add a touch of drama and intrigue, while Alfred's humorous dialogue and body language distract from what could potentially be a very serious situation. Also apparent from the staging and dialogue is that Alfred is a well-to-do, with a penchant for womanising (although that is brought into question later on) and the tendency to not take things very seriously.

Based on this scene, what are some of the things you notice about the scene’s use of sound? Describe a specific sound or line of dialogue you hear and what you think it adds to the scene’s effectiveness.

Although this particular scene is not a musical number, I found that the use of sound was just as effective in portraying a mood and setting a tone. For example, the first thing we hear is distant arguing, growing closer until Alfred opens the door and speaks to the audience.  He is telling us what is happening, but we are already interested from having to strain our ears to hear what is going on behind closed doors. Another great example of the use of sound is how the dramatic music starts just after Paulette "shoots" herself. This is the first time we hear music in the scene, and it adds to the perceived seriousness of what has happened. Just as the music swells, Paulette's husband "shoots" Alfred and then we get absolute silence again while the two try to figure out why Alfred isn't dead - which is quite a funny moment. This contrast between the loud bangs, dramatic music, dialogue, and silence all add to the dichotomy going on between drama and comedy. 

What themes or approaches might you anticipate from this clip in other Depression-era musicals?

Once again we see comedic elements in situations which appear formal or serious, poking fun at one another, and the jealous male. Some other themes I would anticipate include the use of sound effects to set the tone, a mixture of genres, mistaken meaning, and playfully making fun of the problems in the lives of the well-to-do.

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  • What do you notice about the Lubitsch touch? How do the props, the dialogue, and the staging help you understand the character of Alfred (Maurice Chevalier)?

The addition of the garter not belonging to the woman that he's currently with shows that he has more than one woman that he's fooling around with. He also has a fancy place which shows his wealth. By the husband coming in, it shows that not only does this man have multiple women, but he sleeps with married ones. At the end, him needing to report to the queen further demonstrates his importance though I didn't catch the extent of what that importance was.

  • Based on this scene, what are some of the things you notice about the scene’s use of sound? Describe a specific sound or line of dialogue you hear and what you think it adds to the scene’s effectiveness.

The gun going off twice, but not actually shooting anyone was interesting. It shows that it perhaps has blanks in it? Just for her to fake it, I guess. Their argument at the beginning that we only hear was also intriguing and made me want to know more about their relationship.

  • What themes or approaches might you anticipate from this clip in other Depression-era musicals?

The use of the suggestion of sex without needing to be direct about it I think will be in other musicals as well. The use of wealth as an escape for the audience will also continue to be a theme.

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