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TopBilled

Someone says TCM's playing LESS movies now. True?

57 posts in this topic

15 hours ago, jimmymac71 said:

Don't think so. I was knee high to a grasshopper then. Don't know if I've seen Star Trek since it was new. A favorite would be "Piece Of The Action," where Spock discovers an AM radio station. That and "Trouble With Tribbles."

Okay, James T. Kirk. What is the T?

I am also thinking of a song by Sylvia (Country Singer) called "Drifter." We are drifting bigger than The Duke.

a piece of the action.jpg

"T" to the third power for Transgender Time Traveller?

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Three points:

1. Are we not considering their TCM originals as added value? They are doing more of that too. There is more context being provided as younger audiences come on, and we must remember that they are always trying to broaden their audience. Their original content/specials help some learn more about genres, specific stars/directors/cinematographers/directors, etc. Both younger audiences and non movieholics like we have on this board benefit from these kind of informational explorations. More discussion must be testing well. As a former marketer, I know they wouldn't be doing it if it hasn't been tested and beaten the old model. Some people need a bathroom break and a chance to smile at one's loved one before they turn back to the small screen to watch the classics (my husband appreciate me coming up for air from TCM to be sure). I also think it is added value (I enjoyed the Bette Davis special). All the original content costs money and requires time aired. This brings me to point two.

2. As several have pointed out, TCM makes money from subscriptions. Someone else astutely pointed out that we must ask if they are really padding their pockets or barely staying afloat. It is acquiring new movies as possible, expanding staff for better overall experience, partnering to expand what they can bring to the table (Ball State University courses, etc.) This all takes money. We've all concurred that the no commercials, not overlays of promos, and no interruptions are our preference. TCM is growing how it stays profitable and that requires money. I'm willing to pay more for what they provide. If we have to watch their wine club ads and cruise ads and festival ads (I want to go to the festival) in exchange for no interruptions and access to classic movies, bring on the decrease of movies on the hour.

3. Streaming that can be available for subscriptions: the toe is in the water for them examining how they adapt their model for younger viewers who rarely watch TV the is scheduled or on an actual television.  I've been checking out their subscription stuff as well as streaming capabilities, and it is helping accommodate audiences they need in order to stay for profit. Ease of access by an "On Demand" access appeals to so many. It's also allowing them to show content they can't show on TV. I'm talking about violence, sex, foreign language, etc.   Opting-in  or subscribing to this content allows them to share the bigger picture of cinema than what most current TCM viewers want to see. I think it is a matter of diversifying audience content to multiple platforms because they are increasing the variety of audiences.  There will be those who want what TCM was, those enjoying what it is becoming, and those who look to see it push even further into how new platforms allow it to deliver as the premiere cinema source. Kudos to them for exploring how to do this. I want all the mediums, frankly. I enjoy intentional programming with a goal of shaping experience. I also enjoy freedom to watch at my leisure wherever I am. 

 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, MotherofZeus said:

Three points:

1. Are we not considering their TCM originals as added value? They are doing more of that too. There is more context being provided as younger audiences come on, and we must remember that they are always trying to broaden their audience. Their original content/specials help some learn more about genres, specific stars/directors/cinematographers/directors, etc. Both younger audiences and non movieholics like we have on this board benefit from these kind of informational explorations. More discussion must be testing well. As a former marketer, I know they wouldn't be doing it if it hasn't been tested and beaten the old model. Some people need a bathroom break and a chance to smile at one's loved one before they turn back to the small screen to watch the classics (my husband appreciate me coming up for air from TCM to be sure). I also think it is added value (I enjoyed the Bette Davis special). All the original content costs money and requires time aired. This brings me to point two.

2. As several have pointed out, TCM makes money from subscriptions. Someone else astutely pointed out that we must ask if they are really padding their pockets or barely staying afloat. It is acquiring new movies as possible, expanding staff for better overall experience, partnering to expand what they can bring to the table (Ball State University courses, etc.) This all takes money. We've all concurred that the no commercials, not overlays of promos, and no interruptions are our preference. TCM is growing how it stays profitable and that requires money. I'm willing to pay more for what they provide. If we have to watch their wine club ads and cruise ads and festival ads (I want to go to the festival) in exchange for no interruptions and access to classic movies, bring on the decrease of movies on the hour.

3. Streaming that can be available for subscriptions: the toe is in the water for them examining how they adapt their model for younger viewers who rarely watch TV the is scheduled or on an actual television.  I've been checking out their subscription stuff as well as streaming capabilities, and it is helping accommodate audiences they need in order to stay for profit. Ease of access by an "On Demand" access appeals to so many. It's also allowing them to show content they can't show on TV. I'm talking about violence, sex, foreign language, etc.   Opting-in  or subscribing to this content allows them to share the bigger picture of cinema than what most current TCM viewers want to see. I think it is a matter of diversifying audience content to multiple platforms because they are increasing the variety of audiences.  There will be those who want what TCM was, those enjoying what it is becoming, and those who look to see it push even further into how new platforms allow it to deliver as the premiere cinema source. Kudos to them for exploring how to do this. I want all the mediums, frankly. I enjoy intentional programming with a goal of shaping experience. I also enjoy freedom to watch at my leisure wherever I am. 

 

There is nothing I could add to improve the above message. I did not grow up with these films. Not sure how many times I watched THE WIZARD OF OZ in B&W, because we did not have a color TV. It play on broadcast TV annually, and we almost always watched. Back in my day, it was ABC, CBS, NBC, PBS. We had an antenna in a tree, out in 'the sticks.' We did get independent channels, and that is the only placed we watched older movies. Movies at the theater were new.

Many people here are way beyond what I know. Many TCM showings are new to me. Being visually impaired, to be completely honest, moves me in the direction of watching movies over again.

I would be delighted to share my TV viewing habits with TCM. I am not as 'hooked' as some. I grew up in a time when both TV and radio were way better. In one way or another, modern TV and movies, music too, are just obscene to me. So, I love what TCM gives me.

Guess I don't care if TCM has to do things different as time goes by. I am 60. What about the people who are 30? Will TCM be around when they are my age? Sure hope so!

EDIT: King Solomon's Mines just ended and Sergeant Rutledge just began. First movie ran 80 minutes. 10 minutes of TCM stuff. Second film started at the bottom of the hour. This is not terribly uncommon.

Edited by jimmymac71
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18 minutes ago, jimmymac71 said:

There is nothing I could add to improve the above message. I did not grow up with these films. Not sure how many times I watched THE WIZARD OF OZ in B&W, because we did not have a color TV. It play on broadcast TV annually, and we almost always watched. Back in my day, it was ABC, CBS, NBC, PBS. We had an antenna in a tree, out in 'the sticks.' We did get independent channels, and that is the only placed we watched older movies. Movies at the theater were new.

Many people here are way beyond what I know. Many TCM showings are new to me. Being visually impaired, to be completely honest, moves me in the direction of watching movies over again.

I would be delighted to share my TV viewing habits with TCM. I am not as 'hooked' as some. I grew up in a time when both TV and radio were way better. In one way or another, modern TV and movies, music too, are just obscene to me. So, I love what TCM gives me.

Guess I don't care if TCM has to do things different as time goes by. I am 60. What about the people who are 30? Will TCM be around when they are my age? Sure hope so!

 

I also remember the days of waiting to see the greats: Wizard of Oz, Sound of Music, Willie Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, Easter Parade and maybe Yankee Doodle Dandy on network tv once a year.  I was lucky enough to grow up in Las Vegas where the local channel played all of Howard Hughe's B movies late at night. I never slept well, so I would sit up and watch the old black and whites.  Some great. Most not so great. Add to that my being born to a single mother who often left me with my granny who was born into the Great Depression. She is the archetype of a classic Hollywood devotee who schooled me well.  Not until Turner came along was I able to access the archives they continue to expand. I pretty much have TCM on by default.  When I need to, I set my DVR to record because they don't make some things On Demand. The new streaming extras are a bonus. I"m almost 50, but my marketing background makes me aware that they have to balance existing fan audience with acquiring new viewing audiences and multiple sources of income.  Good on them if it means they continue to bring me the movies I used to never see and the ones I only saw once a year. 

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On 6/7/2018 at 1:44 PM, TopBilled said:

In my TCM schedules thread on another forum someone posted this:

Screen Shot 2018-06-07 at 10.41.04 AM.png

To which I replied:

Not sure I understand what you mean. Are you saying they are spacing out the movies to put in more of those wine club ads and Backlot stuff? Thereby reducing the overall total number of films that air each day? Is that what you're saying? 

*****

Is TCM really playing less films now than they did five years ago?

I posted this addition earlier, probably should have quoted the OP.

 

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Another Stat: The Young Stranger just played. I jumped in toward the end, but suspect Alicia did an intro. She followed the film with some talk as well. The movies is 84 minutes, and Alicia used some extra time. TCM showed 3 promos before moving right along with Desk Set. The 3 promos gobbled up about 2 minutes of time. TCM started Desk Set at the bottom of the hour, rather than :45. Wow! I could not ask for more.

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