jeepersneaker

The Wizard of Oz

73 posts in this topic

Currently watching Wizard of Oz. Taking notice of sets, costumes, etc more in detail for the musicals course. As this was made in the height of the Great Depression, it really epitomizes the escapism and contrast between reality and fantasy. I love the hopeful vibe you are left with whenever you watch it. I still admire the lengths they went with the effects such as the makeup and special effects, which were potentially harmful to the cast. I believe it really was a film beyond its time! 

witch-entrance.png

wizard_of_oz_original_poster_1939.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all - What are your favorite scenes and/or favorite quotes from the Wizard of Oz? AND what are your least favorite scenes from this movie?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for beginning the discussion on the wizard of Oz.  There's so much that can be said about the significance of WO.  First, Judy Garland, age 16, was the correct choice compared to Little Miss Temple, age 11 in 1939.  She would have been about the same size as the Munchins.  No contrast there.  Politically, FDR, in the time of the Great Depression, became the first President to be on television (The Wizard?).  

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The camera movements are getting smoother and the variety of shots increased. It's a beautiful movie, and edited fairly well. The "special effects" were amazing for the time and still quite inventive, and sometimes dangerous. On a separate note, the Wicked Witch of the West is still one of the scariest characters in cinema.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Tomilee said:

On a separate note, the Wicked Witch of the West is still one of the scariest characters in cinema.

Indeed she was. When I was a little girl watching the movie I literally covered my face whenever she was on the screen and my parents had to tell me she was gone before I would look again. For a while I had this notion that if I slept facing my window I would see her flying by, like Dorothy did as the house was spinning, so I always slept with my back to the window so if she did go by I wouldn't see her.

On a darker note, I believe there was at least one subtle reference to drugs in Wizard of Oz, when the witch scatters poppies all over the field and everyone but the Tin Man falls asleep. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I cannot imagine Shirley Temple as Dorothy (rather, I prefer not to).  Amazingly Dorothy solos in only one complete song in the film.  Shirley Temple could not have handled "Over the Rainbow", and had she played the role we might never have heard the song and Judy would have had a different signature song for the rest of her career.  I'm aware that we nearly didn't hear Judy singing it either, but I have to believe that if Shirley sang it it would have stayed on the cutting room floor.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Margaret Hamilton - In 1975, she made an appearance on Mr. Rogers because The Wizard of Oz was very popular on TV and kids were scared to death of the Wicked Witch. So she explained how this was a role in a movie and she put on the witch costume so kids could see her transformation. It was a cute segment. 

 

2075649721_ScreenShot2018-06-07at7_35_22PM.thumb.png.fd89392bd7d0c0aa8f30cb4c2b81a501.png

  • Like 7
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, A’Capellagal said:

Surprisingly how many phrases from his movie have made it into the vernacular i.e. “Don’t make me release the flying monkeys”.

"I'll get you and your little dog, too!"

I think the most famous is "Lions and tigers and bears, oh my!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another quote. “i don’t think we’re in Kansas anymore. Another thing about this movie is that it brings back such fond memories. It usually came on TV around Thanksgiving. We watched it every year. When it came out on VHS my dad brought it for me. 

The first time we saw it in color was when my aunt bought a color TV and we’d go to her house to watch.

i saw it with my nephew when he saw it for the first. 

I directed the play three times while I taught in 3 different schools.

Many, many years later I saw it in the theater for the first time. It was a sing-a-long.

The music in the opening credits always brings back all of those memories. The most famous quote is so true when I watch this movie. “There’s no place like home.”

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My favorite scene is a relatively minor one although it's the catalyst for one of the most important in the movie. That's the woman holding the cat. I'm just a cat lover (my husband has threatened to divorce me if I take in one more stray) and Siamese have been my favorite cats since I had one as a girl.

I don't know that I have a least favorite scene. If I think of one I'll get back to you. :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Least favorite, definitely the tornado sequence.  This just terrified me when I was little and I saw it on TV, I had to hide my face.  It didn't help growing up in the Midwest, too real.   The whole scene smacks of Armageddon;  everyone frantic, from the releasing of the horses,  to running around in semi-panic, to rounding everyone up to go into the storm cellar.  And then that wind and darkness. Dorothy gets back and finally picks up Toto,  and goes into the house disintegrating around her, stomps on the storm cellar with no luck and she's left to fate.  The suspense and horror of it all, it was too much. One thing strikes me as odd when I see it... what is she dawdling about?  Why isn't she running back to the house instead of walking along, unless the wind is too strong..  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Love the movie but found an error in the syllabus about when Margaret Hamilton was burned. It was not during the melting scene but the descent in Munchkin land. She accidentally caught on fire and was burned. I took a History of Movies class and we had to study this movie. It was interesting how they did the tornado too. ENJOY!

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wizard of Oz listed by everyone as a classic, so finding fault with it is kinda difficult! The idea of switching from B&W to color is arguably the key to this film. The story featuring a youngster just about makes viewers classify it as a coming-of-age story and there’s plenty of iconic, symbolism attached to the characters. Classifying film overall seems difficult, more so than most ‘musicals.’ I’d call it a combination of music/comedy/drama (& horror? Scares plenty of youngsters). One can apply Jungian symbolism throughout the film to gain further insight into characters. I found a book where a Jungian psychologist applied his system to Tarot cards that’s very helpful in sorting things out. There’s a Joker, the Everyman hero (Dorothy). A Magician (the Wizard). High Priestess (good Witch). I’m not going to include all the info from book (Jung and Tarot, An Archetypal Journey by Sallie Nichols), but I’ve used info from this source before to help decipher complex characters/situations for a number of books I’ve read or studied in college many moons ago. The other main tool I use is the Theory of the Ten Worlds (Nichiren Buddhism), which is a very informative means for sorting out characters, too. Everyone tends toward staying in one of these ten life conditions (although life is much more complicated than that and there is the potential to change moment by moment-it would take up way too much room here to explain-I’ve been a Buddhist for 45 years and I’m still learning). So we can end up learning, not only about the material being studied, but also about ourselves, as well. Just throwing this out there in case anyone’s interested. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Least favorite scene is definitely Dorothy being trapped by the Wicked Witch as the hourglass runs out. When I was little I felt Dorothy’s fright when the Wicked Witch appeared in the crystal ball instead of Aunt Em! The severity of having to kill Dorothy to get the shoes always stuck with me and added to that suspense of the hourglass. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My favorite scene is when the Scarecrow, the Tin Man and the Cowardly Lion get the “rewards” from the Wizard. You realize that they had brains, a heart, and courage all along. They each showed a talent that they supposedly lacked throughout the movie (e.g.), The Tin Man showed emotion by crying when Dorothy was in danger. The cowardly lion showed bravery by going to the castle even though he was frightened, and  scarecrow came up with some very good ideas during the journey. I don’t have a least favorite scene...I love this movie!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My new favorite line as of tonight is "people without brains do an awful lot of talking!" because of how relevant it is for today.

I still love the scene where she realizes her home is the best place to be. I got emotional during it tonight, actually. 

My least favorite part, still, is anything with the Wicked Witch of the West. Margret Hamilton was AMAZING but she gives me the shivers.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Gigi123 said:

Thanks for beginning the discussion on the wizard of Oz.  There's so much that can be said about the significance of WO.  First, Judy Garland, age 16, was the correct choice compared to Little Miss Temple, age 11 in 1939.  She would have been about the same size as the Munchins.  No contrast there.  Politically, FDR, in the time of the Great Depression, became the first President to be on television (The Wizard?).  

However, in the original book by Baum, Shirley Temple would have been slightly older than Dorothy, thus as far as book goes, the best age to have played her. Unlike the movie, the book had political significance, in a time where there was great political debate in 1890s as whether the U.S. should be on silver or gold standard. Baum was among those who supported silver. In the book, Dorothy did not have ruby slippers, but silver ones, that helped her travel the yellow (gold) brick road. Lots of political allegories in the book.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It turned out for the best that Ebsen wasn't the tin man.  I don't get the original casting of both Bolger and Ebsen.  They were both similar types of dancers, so would they try to outdo the other?  Challenge dance?  Or be partners like Astaire/Kelly?  I'd be curious to see outlines for routines;  I would think they'd have done some preliminary routine workup before they got to the costume and makeup stage.   

Also Ebsen was 6'3", while Bolger, Lahr (and Haley) were some 5'10".   Ebsen would have been half a foot taller and the wide shots of the four would have looked different.  Although this might have been altered with taller/shorter hats and shoes.    

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Tomilee said:

Margaret Hamilton - In 1975, she made an appearance on Mr. Rogers because The Wizard of Oz was very popular on TV and kids were scared to death of the Wicked Witch. So she explained how this was a role in a movie and she put on the witch costume so kids could see her transformation. It was a cute segment. 

Oh my Tomilee, how you have made me cry with that wonnnnderful clip of our fav WWW, Margaret Hamilton. How great it was to see her with Mr. Rogers in her Oz costume, no less! I was blessed to get to meet her and get her autograph way back in the mid-'70s, when she played the mother role in the Broadway touring musical -"A Little Night Music" with Jean Simmons in the lead. And we met her on Halloween, no less. What perfect timing, huh! My then boyfriend, an artist, gave her a picture he had drawn of her as the WWW. and she signed the front cover of my original 1956 (MGM Records first edition soundtrack) 33 1/3 vinyl recording of The Wizard of Oz soundtrack. I still have it, of course! On it she wrote "To Betty With my warmest & best wishes & my thanks for my cute counterpart (the artwork)- Witching Wishes, W.W.W. Margaret Hamilton & she drew a little pointed hat next to her name. I can't tell you what a thrill that was, since Wizard has been my first and favorite movie since I was born. I've collected Oz memorabilia my whole life and have games, glassware, posters, books galore, dolls, plates, music boxes, Xmas ornaments/lights - you name it. Besides Fred and Gene, Oz has me wrapped around its finger ha. Seeing this clip helped me remember what a wonderful lady Margaret Hamilton was and a great actress too!!

WWW Margaret Hamilton.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

See pix of W of Oz sets below. Yea, I hear ya Pastiche and the wild thing is how the wind is so strong it will pull a tree out of its roots and toss it away past her and takes the front door right off its hinges yet the hanging plant on the front porch barely moves ha! I once had a dream about the "twister" scene and in it, I was down in the storm cellar with Uncle Henry, Auntie Em, Hickory, Zeke and Hunk and we were all wondering what was happening outside haha. Yea, I grew up in the Midwest too and one time I did have a dream where 2 tornadoes touched down not far from my house and guess what, 2 days later, 2 tornadoes did touch down in a suburb not far from mine. Pretty wild huh! Here's some pix I found of the W of Oz sets.

wiz oz set still 16.jpg

wiz oz set still 06.jpg

wiz oz set still 10.jpg

wiz oz set still 11.jpg

wiz oz set still 12.jpg

  • Thanks 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My favorite: when they killed the Wicked Witch of the West.

Least favorite: when Dorothy falls asleep in field of poppies.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Pastiche said:

Least favorite, definitely the tornado sequence.  This just terrified me when I was little and I saw it on TV, I had to hide my face.  It didn't help growing up in the Midwest, too real.   The whole scene smacks of Armageddon;  everyone frantic, from the releasing of the horses,  to running around in semi-panic, to rounding everyone up to go into the storm cellar.  And then that wind and darkness. Dorothy gets back and finally picks up Toto,  and goes into the house disintegrating around her, stomps on the storm cellar with no luck and she's left to fate.  The suspense and horror of it all, it was too much. One thing strikes me as odd when I see it... what is she dawdling about?  Why isn't she running back to the house instead of walking along, unless the wind is too strong..  

I agree, as a kid, this scene frightened me. I was more horrified at the idea of her being left behind. Not being from the midwest, tornadoes were more abstract for me. And as an adult, even though I know the story can’t happen otherwise, I still wonder if they were right to leave her behind! Haha. 

My least favorite scene was always the makeovers at the Emerald City. I was so impatient during that portion of the movie. My favorite scene is when the witch calls for the winged monkeys.  So effective!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rest in Peace Jerry Maren just learned he died May 24, the last Munchkin (dressed in green from the lollipop guild).  He had a long career.

07MAREN2-articleLarge.jpg?quality=75&auto=webp&disable=upscale

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us