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CaveGirl

Extra Credit Credits Question

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Are you addicted to reading all the cast names and their roles when you watch a movie?

I am not ashamed to admit that I am! Of course all my friends, boyfriends, relatives and anyone I've ever gone to a movie with, hate me for this. I won't leave the theatre till I have read all the credits and on movies nowadays, that takes forever. All that crapola about what company did the food wagon, and who supplied the cars, and where was the dang thing shot, and thanks to the National Forestry Preserve for their help, comes up first so it takes forever. Why it could take twenty minutes before one gets out of the theatre, but I still like to read it all.

Actually though, it is almost not worth it now though, since the old movies have all the fun credits to see. Now sometimes it is just because I really see someone in costume or disguise and want to find out who it is. But my main reason to watch credits is for entertainment. When I see something listed like "Mangy Dog" played by Jeff the Beagle, it just is good for a laugh. Now I realize, looking stuff up on the IMDb now, does not necessarily mean that in the original screen credits this moniker was really listed, but it's still fun.

For example, one of my favorites is "Near Sighted Woman". I'm not sure if I would want this on my credits if I were an actor, but who knows. Some films, like the original "Hairspray" have oodles of fun credits, like "Snoopy Old Lady", "Slob **** Woman" and "Special Ed Student". If you are also addicted to screen credit watching, post your faves!

P.S. OMG, they bleeped R-e-d-n-e-c-k!

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I like to check out all the credits, too.  In the old classic film era, a lot of credits weren't listed that are listed today like who provided the catering.  One of my pet peeves is when I watch a movie or TV show and the credits are reduced to tiny print and fast-forwarded while some other programming is being promoted.  Show the credits the way God intended, programmers!  At least TCM respects credits.

As for favorite credits, I like the goofy AIRPLANE and NAKED GUN credits.

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I recently watched Netflix for the first time ever, my experiences of which I've been intending to compile into a separate thread, and I was distressed to see the instant a movie or program is over, they cue up something else for you to watch, and within 20 seconds, that next program starts. So, credit-watching, a pasttime of mine since childhood, is completely impossible on Netflix, as far as I can tell, which I find very fascist. In the theater, I always sit and watch the entirety of the credits. One reason was to see the 173 million films on which Mo Henry was credited as a negative cutter, not a job important enough to make the opening credits, I guess, but I can't tell you how many zillions of films he(?)'s in the closing credits. Also, I like to scan those cast lists for the occasional performer who's been left out of the opening credits for one reason or another, and I love looking at filming locations and song credits.

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As fans of the Marvel Cinematic Universe know by now, you pretty much have to sit through the closing credits of each movie or risk missing a crucial mid-credits or post-credits sequence. "Avengers: Infinity War" featured the latter -- a scene involving S.H.I.E.L.D. biggies Maria Hill (Cobie Smulders) and Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson).

Image result for nick fury maria hill infinity war

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Sewhite- Mo Henry is a woman.

Wow thanks for letting me know about Netflix-I'll never subscribe.

I have always sat through the closing credits mostly to decompress from watching the film but also to spot names of people I know. I remember when the credits started taking on novella lengths with tiny type due to "guild" rules of crediting everyone. What a bore.

So then they adopted breaking up the credits with Easter Eggs: another really stupid bore, especially when creating "outtakes" in a cartoon.
Movies are so boring these days, "decompressing" -bringing the viewer back to reality- isn't even necessary.

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Actually, inserting those outtakes, either real or "made up" for cartoons didn't get anyone to pay more attention to the closing credits, just SIT through them without reading them while waiting for the NEXT funny "outtake".

I usually too, never bother looking at them or reading them unless I AM curious as to "WHO was that who DID that one part?"

But too, I never really cared WHO was the "Key Grip" or the "best boy".  Heh.  That "Best Boy" thing sounds too pedophillic for my tastes anyway.  ;)

Sepiatone

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9 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

I wonder how that works on Netflix.

When your movie is over and the credits start to roll, and the next program cues up, normally the original movie is minimized to the top left of the screen, sort of like a small picture in picture. If you click on that, it will return your original program to full screen and you can watch the credits to their completion. Hope this helps!

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A cute, simple joke from the 1996 mockumentary Waiting For Guffman --- Paul Benedict portrays a character named Roy Loomis, who everyone assumes is THE Mr. Guffman.  The end credits list Benedict as having played "Not Guffman."

In the Coen Brothers' 1996 dark comedy Fargo, one of the dead bodies ("Victim in Field") is credited to the symbol for The Artist Formerly Known As Prince.  (The symbol is lying horizontally!)  This victim was actually played by the film's storyboard artist J. Todd Anderson.

 

 

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I'm drifting into opening credits now rather than closing credits, but the Coens also have a fictional film editor they credit, can't think of the name right now, a job they've done themselves on most of their movies.

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33 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

I'm drifting into opening credits now rather than closing credits, but the Coens also have a fictional film editor they credit, can't think of the name right now, a job they've done themselves on most of their movies.

"Roderick Jaynes" is the pseudonym used by the filmmaking brothers Joel and Ethan Coen, who tend to have fingers in many pies during the process of creating movies. The photo below was used to represent Jaynes during the 80th Academy Awards telecast before the announcement of the 2007 Best Film Editing winner. Nominated for "No Country for Old Men," he lost to Christopher Rouse of "The Bourne Ultimatum." Jaynes also was nominated for a 1996 Oscar for "Fargo," but lost to Walter Murch of "The English Patient."

jaynes.jpg

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8 minutes ago, jakeem said:

"Roderick Jaynes" is the pseudonym used by the filmmaking brothers Joel and Ethan Coen, who tend to have fingers in many pies during the process of creating movies. The photo below was used to represent Jaynes during the 80th Academy Awards telecast before the announcement of the 2007 Best Film Editing winner. Nominated for "No Country for Old Men," he lost to Christopher Rouse of "The Bourne Ultimatum." Jaynes also was nominated for a 1996 Oscar for "Fargo," but lost to Walter Murch of "The English Patient."

jaynes.jpg

I can see one of two scenarios if Roderick Jaynes had won:  either one or both of the Coens would have accepted it on his behalf or the presenters would have said, "Rodrerick couldn't be with us tonight and we accept this award on his behalf."  ?

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10 minutes ago, ChristineHoard said:

I can see one of two scenarios if Roderick Jaynes had won:  either one or both of the Coens would have accepted it on his behalf or the presenters would have said, "Rodrerick couldn't be with us tonight and we accept this award on his behalf."  ?

I believe it would have been the latter scenario. Although everyone in the industry is in on the joke, I can't imagine that either of the Coens would acknowledge they are breaking the rules by editing their own films.

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Not that long ago closing credits would begin with a cast list. Has that been thrown out in more modern times? I don't want to wait for all the other credits that precede it. Never mind going to the Database, I know that i can do that, but there is satisfaction in seeing the list immediately after the movie is over. Wah !!!

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