summerlily72

Why does Hollywood have so much female nudity in moves?

33 posts in this topic

On ‎6‎/‎11‎/‎2018 at 2:05 PM, CaveGirl said:

You forgot the caption:

"Harry, Harr-eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee! You get away from that Yvette Vickers or I am going to kill you with my bare hands!!!!!!!"

THIS LOOKS NEAT

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18 minutes ago, spence said:

Sorry to cigharjoe, but it's fairly obvious again it's mostly about $money$ 

Of course it's about the MONEY is somebody gonna make a film for free? 

What makes these low budget films worthwhile, to quote V. Vale & Andrea Juno in Incredibly Strange Films, is the "unfettered creativity. Often the films are eccentric-even extreme-presentations by individuals freely expressing their imaginations..." To quote Picasso "Ah, good taste! What a dreadful thing! Taste is the enemy of creativeness."

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On 6/10/2018 at 10:36 AM, NipkowDisc said:

never mind the nude babes. lets see some 50 foot ones going after their two-timing husbands and boyfriends.

:D

Related image

Related image

Try Attack of the 50 Foot Cheerleader.

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There is a lot less nudity today than in the recent past as has been noted.  What I find amazing is the movies and TV shows rated R or MA, which have little, if any, nudity but a lot of gratuitous foul language.  Not to mention violence.

I remember watching the first episode of Veep and couldn't believe how many times they used the F word.  Somebody probably did a count.  

Not a prude as I use curse words way more than I should (learned from my father as Ralphie in A Christmas Story did).

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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

Of course it's about the MONEY is somebody gonna make a film for free? 

What makes these low budget films worthwhile, to quote V. Vale & Andrea Juno in Incredibly Strange Films, is the "unfettered creativity. Often the films are eccentric-even extreme-presentations by individuals freely expressing their imaginations..." To quote Picasso "Ah, good taste! What a dreadful thing! Taste is the enemy of creativeness."

OMG! I own that book too, "Research #10: Incredibly Strange Films". In what other book can you find references from the work of Brakhage all the way to someone like Ted V. Mikels. Did they ever make a second volume to your knowledge, CigarJoe? I also own the companion piece, "Incredibly Strange Music", with both Volume 1 and 2. They are killer also!

By the way, I have always admired Picasso's assertion about taste derailing creativity.

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Did they ever make a second volume to your knowledge, CigarJoe?

None that I am aware of, but then I've never checked.

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3 hours ago, TheCid said:

There is a lot less nudity today than in the recent past as has been noted.  What I find amazing is the movies and TV shows rated R or MA, which have little, if any, nudity but a lot of gratuitous foul language.  Not to mention violence.

I remember watching the first episode of Veep and couldn't believe how many times they used the F word.  Somebody probably did a count.  

Not a prude as I use curse words way more than I should (learned from my father as Ralphie in A Christmas Story did).

That's true. Now personally, foul language is so commonplace that I don't usually find it very jarring (except in period-set stories, like the Feud miniseries and the HBO film RKO 281, where it just didn't seem to fit the era, although the rest of the productions were excellent), but it is true the f-word is used a lot more than it used to be. They have a list on Wikipedia of films that used that word 150 times or more. With only a few exceptions, almost all of them came out after 1990.

I think movie critics picked up on that too. I once saw a clip from a 1994 episode of Siskel and Ebert about a 25th anniversary rerelease  of Midnight Cowboy, and Ebert saying that compared to the Rs they were seeing in the modern day, Midnight Cowboy was considerably more blunt about sex, but hardly reveled in as much language or violence.

And violence is undoubtedly more common and receives more screentime. Lots of action films get PG-13s and they have a lot of violent scenes without showing blood. Blood it seems often sends a film packing for the R. Case in point:The 2001 noir homage The Man Who Wasn't There, had a scene where a man was accidentally killed in a fight. It ended with the man on his back on the floor making gurgling sounds and a blood pool appearing beside him. The film was in black-and-white so it wasn't as graphic, and nothing else in the film (no other scenes of violence, no hard swearing, no nudity, one suggestive scene ) went beyond PG-13 territory, but because they showed blood, it got an R. I can think of PG-13s with a lot more violence.

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I saw Midnight Cowboy at the post theater at Ft. Bragg, NC in 1971.  It was the first R rated movie shown at a military base.  Would barely merit a PG-13 now.

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