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DAILY DOSE OF DELIGHT #5 (From Yankee Doodle Dandy)

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  1. Describe how the scenes in today’s Daily Dose were designed to promote American values for audiences during World War II. Be specific. Refer to props, set design, settings, etc. in your answer.

The painting on the walls of the past presidents, the flags that were present in the office, it was clear that they were in the White House.  I see the values in Cohan's reaction to his surrounding too.  He is clearly impressed to be where he is.  Even though he's involved in a conversation on his way to see the President he is trying his best to take in those surrounding.

  1. Listen carefully to the dialogue in these scenes. In what ways does the dialogue and/or the screenplay work to boost American morale? Quote specific lines of dialogue in your response.

The conversation between FDR and Cohan was about how important FDR thought that what Cohan did was for the country and how he had been pro-America for as long as the President could remember having seen him preform.  Cohan explaining that he had learned it from his father as a child, but that he honestly felt the same way. It was clear that he loves his country and it is important to him as well to do his best for his country.

  1. Since this is the opening of a biographical musical, how differently do you feel this film would be if it opened with the Fourth of July Parade scene in Providence, Rhode Island vs. the opening with FDR in the Oval Office? Defend your answer.

I think it would have weakened the film.  By beginning at the end and allowing Cohan to reflect on his beginnings not just as a performer but where he came from as a person it allows the audience to get to know not only George M. Cohan, but where he came from as an individual.  Of course this would still be the case if they film started with the parade, but we wouldn't have had Cohan's prospective of the events to lead us into them.     I think it makes it clearer just how important and proud he is of his country and being born on such an important day to the nation.   

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Describe how the scenes in today’s Daily Dose were designed to promote American values for audiences during World War II. Be specific. Refer to props, set design, settings, etc. in your answer.

References made to the celebration of the flag and parades.  Entrance to the staircase, historical framed photos on the walls, encased memoirs of ships, the camera only showing the back of the President's back during the vocal interchange of conversation.  Antique like props on the President's desk indicative of the decor in the White House.

Listen carefully to the dialogue in these scenes. In what ways does the dialogue and/or the screenplay work to boost American morale? Quote specific lines of dialogue in your response.

Cagney's line, "I was a cocky kid back then always carrying a flag, attending a parade or following one" (symbolism of American patriotism).  The President's response, "I hope that you didn't outgrow the habit.  That's one thing I admired about you Irish Americans.  You carry love of country like a flag, right in the open.  It's a great quality." (reference made to the patriotism of immigrants in the country - the fabric of America).  Cagney spoke of inheriting this from his father.  His father ran away at the young age to join the Civil War.

Since this is the opening of a biographical musical, how differently do you feel this film would be if it opened with the Fourth of July Parade scene in Providence, Rhode Island vs. the opening with FDR in the Oval Office? Defend your answer.

It wouldn't have the reminiscent effect as Cagney is going back in time to where it began with his father, and his roots.  His father performing at the time of the parade, and leads to why he suddenly had to leave - introducing the story with a musical theme.  He is dressed in Irish attire, and proud of his heritage but also proud of being an American.

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1. Describe how the scenes in today's Daily Dose were designed to promote American values for audiences during World War II. Be specific. Refer to props, set design, settings, etc. in your answer.

Cohan is visiting the White House to meet the president, which would be considered a great honor for an American citizen. As he walks toward the Oval Office, he passes by portraits of past presidents. When he begins recalling his life and career, we see a 4th of July parade with veterans marching and onlookers waving American flags.

2. Listen carefully to the dialogue in these scenes. In what way dialogue and/or the screenplay work to boost American morale? Quote specific lines of dialogue in your response.

The African-American butler's admiration for Cohan shows that in order for America to remain a great nation, we must work to look past racial differences. Cohan says that he "was a cocky kid back then, always carrying a flag, attending a parade, or following one", indicating that 4th of July parades were an annual tradition in his family growing up and they had a positive effect on him. When FDR says, "That's one thing I admire about you Irish-Americans. You carry your love of your country like a flag, right in the open. It's a great quality", he is acknowledging that immigrants are the foundation of America and that they deserve respect.

3. Since this is the opening of a biographical musical, how differently do you think this film would be if it opened with the Fourth of July parade scene in Providence, Rhode Island vs. the opening with FDR in the Oval Office? Defend your answer.

If the film opened with the parade, the viewer might not get the context of why it would be important when it comes to Cohan's life and future career. The Oval Office opening gives an older Cohan a chance to look back and reflect on what he has accomplished in his life.

 

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Describe how the scenes in today’s Daily Dose were designed to promote American values for audiences during World War II. Be specific. Refer to props, set design, settings, etc. in your answer.  There are portraits of our founding fathers and a flag standing proudly beside the fireplace, as well as Cohan's flag lapel pin, these all created imagery or symbols of what we were fighting for, just as Washington had.  One thing I was struck by in comparison to the lavish, ornate sets of the musicals from last week (The Great Ziegfeld, Love Parade, Top Hat) The White House set was tasteful and understated; as the nation had moved onto more prosperous times there was no longer the need to create escapism movies.  The decor is simple, masculine: models of ships, framed artwork depicting battles and tall ships might have been found in the library of any American home.  This is the residence of a great leader but not the palace of a monarch; the general public could relate and be comfortable in these settings and likewise it served to make a relaxed atmosphere for Cohan's meeting with FDR.   

Listen carefully to the dialogue in these scenes. In what ways does the dialogue and/or the screenplay work to boost American morale? Quote specific lines of dialogue in your response.  From the opening of  the scene Cohan, descendant of Irish immigrants, and the African-American White House butler exchange a dialogue initiated by the butler as he recounts seeing Cohan in George Washington Jr.  there is no formality or protocol evident as the two are walking side by side, this signifies a unity of all races and creeds and stations of life; as similarly men would be fighting side by side. 

Then Cohan is ushered into FDR's office, the lighting is low key and Curtiz appears to set the tone for a casual "Fireside Chat" (no high-tone formal dinner with dignitaries etc.).  Despite having become a national treasure who had been in the spot light since he was "a pretty cocky kid" and performed for thousands, Cohan admits to being nervous when face to face with the Commander in Chief.  Then FDR's reaches out to shake Cohan's hand and his ensuing warm casual remarks appear to put Cohan at ease as the President expresses his admiration for "you Irish Americans, you carry your love of country like a flag, right out in the open. It's a great quality."   Cohan replies "I inherited that." he continues speaking of his father with pride, and how "he ran away to fight in the civil war at the age of thirteen; this further conveys the importance of familial ties and of the values and ideals instilled by family

Since this is the opening of a biographical musical, how differently do you feel this film would be if it opened with the Fourth of July Parade scene in Providence, Rhode Island vs. the opening with FDR in the Oval Office?  By opening the story at the White House the audience is immediately introduced to George M. and in less than five minutes through the conversations with the butler and FDR Curtiz established rapport and a connection to the character and already a recognition of the American qualities of familial pride, love of country and a sense of nostalgia setting the tone of the whole picture.  Opening with the Fourth of July parade scene would introduce the father first and shift the focus, and eliminate the illuminating narrative.

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1. Scene opens in White House and we see portraits of George Washington on the stairs. The parade scene adds bunting, flags, troops being cheered and then segues to the theatre.

2. The president highlights Cohan’s father’s war service in the civil war, he mentions how Irish Americans where there love for country right out in front like waving the flag. They mention the song you’re a grand old flag and then show a parade supporting the troops- patriotism, family as Cohan Sr worries about his wife and supporting the troops are all there.

3. The opening in the White House gives the scene more gravitas and sets the stage for how important patriotism is to the country. Starting with a parade would be too lighthearted and not set the tone for this movie.

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1. Describe how the scenes in today’s Daily Dose were designed to promote American values for audiences during World War II. Be specific. Refer to props, set design, settings, etc. in your answer.

The first thing I noticed was the flags. There are plenty of flags. And that the clip is set in the White House with the paintings of past Presidents by the staircase, I think that was meant to get people thinking about how much the US had been through and how big of a nation it had grown into. The 4th of July parade is another scene which promotes patriotism.

2. Listen carefully to the dialogue in these scenes. In what ways does the dialogue and/or the screenplay work to boost American morale? Quote specific lines of dialogue in your response.

The clip begins with the butler mentioning the song 'Grand Old Flag' and right from the start the audience is showered with patriotism. Then FDR says, "You Irish Americans you carry your love of country like a flag right out in the open" and Cohan says, " I was a real cocky kid back in those days, a real cocky kid, a real Yankee Doodle Dandy. Always carrying a flag in a parade or following one." Cohan's parents are Irish immigrants and FDR shows appreciation for the Irish-Americans' patriotism to bring the country and it's people together.

3. Since this is the opening of a biographical musical, how differently do you feel this film would be if it opened with the Fourth of July Parade scene in Providence, Rhode Island vs. the opening with FDR in the Oval Office? Defend your answer.

If the construction of the movie had been different and it had opened with the 4th of July parade instead then it would have been difficult to bring the audience into the story since it was put together in a way to take you down a man's memory lane and past.

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Describe how the scenes in today’s Daily Dose were designed to promote American values for audiences during World War II. Be specific. Refer to props, set design, settings, etc. in your answer. The songs about America, anything to do with winning over there, stars and stripes. Promoting how great America is.

  1. Listen carefully to the dialogue in these scenes. In what ways does the dialogue and/or the screenplay work to boost American morale? Quote specific lines of dialogue in your response.  The Buttler saying that the grand old flag song is as great or even better now then it was back then. As I said in question number 1 was how FDR was asking questions to Mr. Cohan about his Irish father on what he did when he was a boy about America and how he just flys the US flag high and to promote how great the US is. 
  2.  
  3. Since this is the opening of a biographical musical, how differently do you feel this film would be if it opened with the Fourth of July Parade scene in Providence, Rhode Island vs. the opening with FDR in the Oval Office? Defend your answer.  I watched this 2 ways. The first way the way how it was shot and it worked great. You were introduced to people. Then I watched it from the opening of the 4th of July parade scene on. It did not work rather well. I prefer the way how it was edited together.

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  1. Describe how the scenes in today’s Daily Dose were designed to promote American values for audiences during World War II. Be specific. Refer to props, set design, settings, etc. in your answer.
  2. The opening scene while Cohen marches up the stairs of the White House and then jumping to a street parade in the late 1800s is a great demonstration of patriotism.  It showed that patriotic parades and American themes have been present for quite some time.
  3. Listen carefully to the dialogue in these scenes. In what ways does the dialogue and/or the screenplay work to boost American morale? Quote specific lines of dialogue in your response.
  4. The opening conversation between the valet and George M. starts the film off to a very patriotic beginning.  He mentions that "Mr. Teddy used to sing it everyday in the bathtub", referring to the title song "Yankee Doodle Dandy".  This is an example of a President showing the smallest gesture of patriotism that any American could also do.  By knowing someone of such stature performs a simple act, it can be inspiring and humbling.
  5. Since this is the opening of a biographical musical, how differently do you feel this film would be if it opened with the Fourth of July Parade scene in Providence, Rhode Island vs. the opening with FDR in the Oval Office? Defend your answer.
  6. I believe that the significance of George M.'s music and contributions would have been lost if the film would have begun with the parade.  While we are aware that his music was very popular for patriotic reasons, we see that there is more influence by beginning the film with the scene in the office.  It also is an opportunity to see the President reflect on his prior performances, which demonstrates his  established reputation.  By beginning with such a notable moment and then cutting to a flashback where his life began on the Fourth of July, it sets the tone for a good All-American story.  

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FDR mentions to Cohan that he likes the Irish Americans because of their love for everything of their country. This one piece of dialogue tells me how the American people were during this time of war: very supportive of America and willing to do anything for it. 

If this movie opened with the Providence parade, I feel like that initial establishment of the situation's seriousness would be completely missing. For me, the scene with Cohan and FDR is better for that reason because there is no vitality in the scene. It is completely serious and the photography of the scene helps establish that mood ascetically as well. 

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  1. There were flags everywhere, use of the Whitehouse and the power of the office of the Presidency, power patriotic musical score as well as the immigrant story in America. All of these props were used to promote a sense in the viewer of patriotism. 
  2. The dialogue promotes positivity about America and the change from being an immigrant to being a "true" American. The dialogue is meant to inspire one to support the system of American values and mores . For example, when the butler greets Cohan at the Whitehouse, he tells him that he was off duty and would have left but heard that Cohan was coming and wanted to be there to greet him and lead him to the President personally.
  3. It was a strong opening with FDR and because it was an immigrant story, highlighting Cohen as an Irish immigrant whose family bought into the American story was important to the selling of this patriotic tale.

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1. Describe how the scenes in today’s Daily Dose were designed to promote American values for audiences during World War II. Be specific. Refer to props, set design, settings, etc. in your answer.

The first scene opens with George Cohen getting one of the greatest honors, being invited to The White House for an audience with the leader of the free world, the President of the United States.  As he is ushered in, the valet tells him what an honor it is and how much he and the President's (past and present) love his work.  They walk up the large winding stair case with the eyes of past President's who constructed the frame work for this great country looking upon them. Cohen is wearing a small pin of the American flag to match the one prominently displayed in the background of the President's office.  Both men speak fondly of Cohen's work and his family, stating how proud they were to have always been patriotic and having strong love for the United States.  The President makes special note of this, which segues into the next scene of a fourth of July parade.  The streets are lined with flags while songs touting how wonderful the country is are heard in the air.  The love for America and everything having to do with the freedoms afforded those who have immigrated here is showcased.

 

2. Listen carefully to the dialogue in these scenes. In what ways does the dialogue and/or the screenplay work to boost American morale? Quote specific lines of dialogue in your response.

G. Cohen:  "I was a pretty cocky kid those days, a pretty cocky kid.  A regular Yankee Doodle Dandy, always carrying a flag in a parade or following one."

President:  "That's one thing I've always admired about you Irish Americans.  You carry your love of country like a flag, right out in the open. It's a great quality."

G. Cohen:   "I inherited that. Got that from my father. He ran away to the Civil War when he was thirteen.  Proudest kid in the whole state of Massachusetts."

The clip then goes on to show that Mr. Cohen has spent his whole life showing his love for this country, even being born on the fourth of July.  Not only do immigrants who yearn for freedom and come to the United States love the country, but everyone lining the streets and waving a flag does as well.

 

3. Since this is the opening of a biographical musical, how differently do you feel this film would be if it opened with the Fourth of July Parade scene in Providence, Rhode Island vs. the opening with FDR in the Oval Office? Defend your answer.

The scene starting with the White House visit sets the stage and tone of the movie, one of respect and love for this country, handed down through generations since the Cohen family came here.  George Cohen meets with the President, who is giving him accolades and kudos for how much he has always loved the United States which opens up the narrative of how Cohen actually came into the world.  Without this, the movie would have to build up to the importance of this figure.  That, or one might think it's just about an immigrant family first and foremost, not the man who came out of that family.

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  1. One scene I watched that was designed to promote American values was the 1878 4th of July parade in Providence, Rhode Island. There were American flags up and down the street, parade goers waving American flags and Army soldiers marching down the parade route. Even though this scene took place in the 18th century, the symbolism of it was relevant and was designed to stir patriotism among the audience during World War II.
  2. The dialogue works to boost American morale when Roosevelt says to Cohan, "You carry your country like a flag, right out in the open."
  3. This film will feel different without the opening setting in the White House because without it, it will be like a straight-up flag-waving film just for the purpose of being proud of this country, instead of it feeling relevant to then-modern wartime audiences with the opening White House scene.

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Describe how the scenes in today’s Daily Dose were designed to promote American values for audiences during World War II. Be specific. Refer to props, set design, settings, etc. in your answer.

A walk up the stairs passing Presidential portraits into an office that celebrates the history of the US Navy with all of the ship models and maritime artifacts on the mantles and tables and walls emphasizes American History and American Military history. We build on a long tradition.

Listen carefully to the dialogue in these scenes. In what ways does the dialogue and/or the screenplay work to boost American morale? Quote specific lines of dialogue in your response.

FDR - haven’t outgrown the habit of Flag-waving. Irish-Americans carry love of country out in the open and encourage others to do the same. The butler Shares that the song “It’s A Grand Old Flag” Is as good a song as ever. Patriotism carries across race and ethnicity and history…

Since this is the opening of a biographical musical, how differently do you feel this film would be if it opened with the Fourth of July Parade scene in Providence, Rhode Island vs. the opening with FDR in the Oval Office? Defend your answer.

The conversation in the office focuses the picture on the American promise. FDR remembers the Cohan’s family act as he discusses a George’s successful career. Work hard and we can win in America. He also identifies with Cohen - we understand each other - We share common experiences, humor and values as Americans. We display and salute the flag and we encourage other to do the same. The theme is set for the picture and you are directed from the beginning to focus on the patriotism.

The parade would be a nice start, but you might draw other conclusions about the emphasis of the movie - just another vaudeville to Broadway story. The movie has to start celebrating on the Fourth of July birthday (If it wasn’t a parade it would have fireworks) - Mr. Cohen’s claim to fame (Wikipedia says July 3).

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1. The American flag was everywhere – on Cagney’s lapel, in the parade and in the hands of the people watching it, and in the Oval Office of the White House.  The valet, who made a point of being at the White House on his day off, mentioned that his previous employer, Teddy Roosevelt, got him a seat in the balcony to watch Mr. Cohan sing the song he wrote: “You’re a Grand Old Flag”, and the song was just as good as it ever was.  I noticed that the police headed the parade of troops and the viewers were proudly waving their flags for the whole procession.  How things have changed.  I remember that the National Anthem was played prior to every movie in the theaters.  In the late 1960’s, my family and I went to a matinee, and we all stood and put our hands on our hearts as the National Anthem was played,  There were about 20 other people in the theater, and none of them stood.  That’s when I noticed a real change.

2. President Roosevelt told Mr. Cohan about seeing the Four Cohans when he was younger, and stated “that’s one thing I’ve always admired about you Irish Americans, you carry your love of country like a flag, right out in the open.  It’s a great quality.”  Cohan answers that “I got that from my father.  He ran away to the Civil War when he was 13.  Proudest kid in the whole state of Massachusetts.”

3.  I think the White House opening set the tone for the picture.  It was the culmination of the events of the past, and how the love of country was so important, especially in perilous times.  It revealed the start of George M. and his life growing up, and what it meant to him.  The 4th of July parade took place in 1878, the year of the first telephone exchange (New Haven, CT); the Senate proposing female suffrage; the silver dollar becoming legal US tender; the Lincoln County War (Billy the Kid and the cowboys) being waged;  Edison patenting the gramophone (first phonograph); Jack Johnson, who went to prison (he was pardoned on May 24, 2018 by Pres. Trump), becoming the first black heavy weight; the first attempt at motion pictures, using 12 cameras each taking one picture, to see if a horse’s 4 feet were off the ground at the same time;  Yellow Fever killing over 13,000 in the Mississippi Valley; the Remington 2 typewriter with the first shift key, enabling the ability to type upper and lowercase letters; the occurance of the Long Depression from 1873 – 1879, which hit Europe and N. America the hardest, even dragging on until 1886; and as we see in the film clip, Cohan Sr. leaving the show abruptly to check on the upcoming birth of his child, George M. Cohan, who would be born on July 3rd, 1878. But he assured the manager his wife would return soon so as not to miss a show.

Comment:  After traveling to Communist China and becoming close to several people there, being friends in Miami with Cuban exiles from Castro’s government, and knowing through my visit to Spain and England, and my brother’s stay in England under their socialist states,  I appreciate with the deepest gratitude that I live in America, a democracy where we have freedom not known by many in this world.  We have become hardened to our great blessings, which we take for granted, and the disdain shown for our Constitution, our National Anthem, our flag, our troops, our police, and firefighters, all those who put their lives, health, and sanity on the line daily to protect and defend us, is to me, a time for sadness.  Belief in God was in the home, the churches, and in public conversation, and are things better now with Him sidelined from our schools and the public square?  If America is so bad, why are so many people from other countries putting themselves in great danger to come here?  I for one stand for the National Anthem, gladly support and thank our military and law enforcement, and feel truly blessed to live in the best nation in the world.

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I hate being a day late and having to repeat what I can only imagine everyone else has said, but here goes!

This opening scene is in the White House.  There are few (if any) settings that could be associated more strongly in the eye of the public as a symbol of the U.S. of A.  There are flags everywhere you look, and as Cagney is ascending the stairs with the manservant, he passes portraits of great presidents virtually every American can recognize.  The scene is designed to be stately and impressive, and to make Americans sit up a bit straighter in their theater seats.

I thought it was interesting that FDR said "you Irish-Americans."  Using 'you' in that type of context is sometimes viewed as offensive today, even when it's followed by something positive.  FDR tells Cohan how much he appreciates the Irish-Americans' "love of country," and then says something like, "You tell the 48 states what a great country it is."  Promoting patriotism/nationalism can't get much more obvious than that.

If they'd started the film with the parade scene, we wouldn't necessarily care what's happening to a young George M. Cohan or his family.  By introducing him as a big shot early on (why else would he be personally meeting the president?), we know to pay attention as soon as the flashbacks commence.  This framing technique reminds me of the whole opening section of It's a Wonderful Life, with the people who love George Bailey praying for him, and then cutting to the scene with the twinkling supernovas assigning Clarence to help.  The bulk of the movie then becomes flashback, and we care about George Bailey before we even see him.  Here we have the voice of the president - a man Americans just about deified - heaping praise upon our protagonist.  So we want to know more about this person!

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1.  Of course the pictures of presidents on the wall behind them as they climb the stairs.  I couldn't help noticing that the one at the top of the stairs is of George Washington.  When Cagney was in the oval office the pictures were of a nautical theme.  The butler discusses how his song, "Grand Old Flag" was his uncles favorite.  This song is about patriotism.

2.  When the president refers to the Irish wearing their patriotism on their chests, and Cagney replies he was either waving the flag or in the parade.  

3.  I've seen this movie several times.and have wondered myself why the parade wasn't ysed it the opening?  My.guess is that the parade is much more powerful message in the movie than in the beginning.

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  1. Describe how the scenes in today’s Daily Dose were designed to promote American values for audiences during World War II. Be specific. Refer to props, set design, settings, etc. in your answer.

First we have the White House, a major symbol for the United States.  As Cohan and the White House butler climb the stairs, we see portraits of the Founding Fathers.  In FDR's office, we see paintings of war battles, reminding us of the country's previous victories.

Flags are everywhere--on Cohan's lapel, in the Oval Office, in the streets during the parade.

The parade is in "small-town America" where we see the hardware store.  And FDR attended "school near Boston" rather than Harvard.

  1. Listen carefully to the dialogue in these scenes. In what ways does the dialogue and/or the screenplay work to boost American morale? Quote specific lines of dialogue in your response.

The butler is African-American (though the actor is uncredited) and Cohan is  Irish-American. This points out the importance of minorities and immigrants to the war effort. We are all needed.

Family is there to support us--Theodore Roosevelt was family (though distant) to FDR; Cohan's father and mother are mentioned; Cohan's father raced from his Vaudeville show to where his wife was having a baby... though the Puritan Work Ethic ensured that he would be back for his next show.

Cohan mentions Horatio Alger, who is known for the idea that people can rise from humble beginnings and become important.  Cohan did it and so can you!

  1. Since this is the opening of a biographical musical, how differently do you feel this film would be if it opened with the Fourth of July Parade scene in Providence, Rhode Island vs. the opening with FDR in the Oval Office? Defend your answer.

By starting with FDR, we get the scope of the story from the beginning.  The frame also allows us to see how the story has a message for the audience of the 40's.

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Look at the parade, Marching bands, flags everywhere, and cheering crowds. A positive scene that one cannot help but to feel happy and patriotic about. In FDR’s office, we can see a picture of battle ship in the background from the Civil war. The Oval office alone is a sign of patriotism.

I really noticed his delivery of these statements. Cagey uses his in a way that you can tell this is proud moment for him. He delivers it with such pride in himself and his father that one is drawn into the feelings that he is having. He never seemed down or melancholy at any point.

Opening with the visit to FDR firmly sets the scene and sets up the parade scene. Even if they opened with the parade scene it still would have been a patriotic setting but the audience would have to catch up a bit to see what was happening and when and why.

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Yankee Doodle Dandy one of the best musicals ever showcasing an era in our histiry.

The film clip has president portraits on the wall, the reference to Teddy Roosevelt, the song reference to a Grand Old Flag,the Oval Office, the mention of Cohan playing the President on Broadway, the reference of Cohen`s father serving in the CivilWar, the parade in the flashback, the patriotic bunting. I believe the biggest reference is that a common man( although famous) can meet with the President of the United States. Where else but the USA .

My parents got married on the 4th of July in 1942. This movie always gave me a glimpse into the past when the era was filled with fear yet there was a great hope that if we pulled together all would be well. I am sure the same hope that the President expresses was what my parents felt on that day even though the world was very scary at that time. 

The dance number on the staircase by Jimmy Cagney Wow, how did he do that!

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From the very beginning of this clip nationalism is front and center. The butler is smiling ear to ear with the chance to meet Cohan (again) and talk about how he last saw him, singing about "that grand ol' flag!"

The staircase they ascend is lined with portraits of the Presidents, and when they switch to a medium shot of the two of them you can see those portraits even better, you can even name who they are.

Throughout this whole clip, if the flag wasn't shown, it was mentioned. Roosevelt even says to him, "That's what I like about you Irish-Americans, you carry your love of Country like a flag, right out in the open!"

The dialogue is also delivered in short bursts at times, almost like a radio host would deliver their lines. It's makes it more direct, short, sweet, and to the point, it's easier to follow.

Opening in the White House instead of the parade I think calls for more respect towards Cohan. He was so patriotic that the President wants to meet him, at the White House, not just anyone can go there, so this guy,

Cohan, must be pretty special. It can almost make someone think, if I'm that patriotic maybe I can meet the President too! While the parade allows for a sense of patriotism as well, it's not as commanding. Instead

it just instills that feeling in the audience, but it may not get them to act that way after the film ends.

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1. As Cohan is walking up the stairs we see paintings of our"forefathers", those presidents we learn about in school. We see a flag over the shoulder of Cohan as he talks to FDR as well as model ships that look very much like the ships that brought the pilgrims over. 

2. There is one line, which several people have mentioned, "That is one thing I admire about you Irish Americans, you carry your love of country like a flag, right out in the open. It's a great quality". I think that is the epitome of the movies that came out in this time frame, during the war.

3. I think it makes more sense to start the movie in "current" times to give us the information we need to know and understand before taking us back in time. 

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1. FDR and Cohan’s dialogue very much concerns itself with the war effort, such as when FDR tells Cohan that his job is to rally up the states in his act. The spirit of the audience watching the army in the past, too, seems as though it was designed as something audiences should model themselves after.

2. The line about rallying up the states is the one that stood out most to me, though this may be more of a call for entertainers to help out in the war effort rather than regular audiences.

3. Opening with the Fourth of July scene probably would have alienated the audience. Having the FDR scene at the beginning gives the audience something to relate to right away. If I had lived during this time period, I probably would have preferred opening with the FDR scenes, though personally I think either one would work just fine.

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1 - The very act of opening the film with a visit to the White House and a private meeting with the President is a show of patriotism.  Add to that the flag positioned across from FDR’s desk near the fireplace, the flag pin in Cohan’s lapel, the reference to Irish-American’s wearing their patriotism like a flag and the number of flags along the parade route and you’ve got a very patriotic picture (literally and figuratively).  Any maybe it’s just me, but the darkness of the Oval Office seemed to reinforce the action taken by every-day Americans of the time:  blackout curtains and conservation of resources needed for the war effort.

2 - The dialogue about flag waving, which Cohan says was part of his life from a young age, would boost morale.  So, too, would comments about the Cohan family (the relationship plays out fully in the film).  I was also struck by references to You’re A Grand Old Flag being a good tune then and now.  Finally, Cohan says he wishes he had all the answers and FDR says he does as well.  I think that’s a reference to the time and would have resonated with film goers.

3 - Had the film opened with the 4th of July parade, it would have been a fine biopic.  Opening it in the White House  adds the patriotic element important for the time period.

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1. The movie/scene starts in the White House - the home of the President of the United States - the leader of the country. Cohan walks up the stairs passing paintings of former Presidents. There is a huge American Flag directly behind where Cohan sits as he begins his conversation with the President.

2. By the time the film is released the term "Yankee Doodle Dandy" is well known - Cohan says "I was a regular Yankee Doodle Dandy, always carrying a flag in a parade, or following one." The President says he hopes Cohan hasn't outgrown that feeling. He also refers to the Cohans as Irish-Americans - not just Americans, but pointing out that specific group. 

3)I feel that by opening the scene with Cohan looking back on his life he's drawing you into the story. As a viewer you are not just thrust in by obvious patriotism, but see it in a more laidback way. Then we see the parade, we find out it's Independence Day, we know where we are, and why. 

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1. The flag in the oval office, the portraits of past presidents lining the walls of the stairway, the flag pin on Cohan's lapel, the paintings of naval ships (FDR was the Secretary of the Navy in WW1) in the oval office and the presence of FDR, recounting the Providence 4th of July parade (and when Cohan was born) - all of these visuals emphasize American history and presence and the FDR makes it current to the audience.

2. This line - That's one thing I always admired about you Irish Americans. You carry your love of country like a flag, right out in the open. It's a great quality. - illustrates the importance of patriotism to a country built on immigrants from many countries (and my mom's parents were Irish Americans and they were extremely proud to be citizens of the US especially during WW2). Cohan and FDR also hit on family (his as vaudevillians and FDR's as attending shows), and Cohan's dad enlisting for the Civil War (tying in to past wars). I also noted the African-American butler referencing Teddy R on the stairs - reinforcing the history of the US.

3. I think opening the movie with the scene with FDR sets up the film as a memoir rather than a biography and allows Cohan (Cagney) to comment on events that formed his legacy. If we started with the parade and chronologically followed his life the film would be more static. I think this touch makes It more personal. Also, the oval office scene presented another way to reinforce patriotism and love of country because FDR and Cohan are talking about how much it means to Cohan (and FDR in a more visual way then Cohan).

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