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DAILY DOSE OF DELIGHT #5 (From Yankee Doodle Dandy)

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  1. Describe how the scenes in today’s Daily Dose were designed to promote American values for audiences during World War II. Be specific. Refer to props, set design, settings, etc. in your answer.  I think all the flag waving,  parades and bands playing helped to promote Patriotism.  So many people lining the streets certainly helped in the overall feeling.  I also noticed all the ships in the Oval Office, I am watching on my tablet so I couldn't make out exactly what their were, so I'll assume warships.
  2. Listen carefully to the dialogue in these scenes. In what ways does the dialogue and/or the screenplay work to boost American morale? Quote specific lines of dialogue in your response.
  3. Since this is the opening of a biographical musical, how differently do you feel this film would be if it opened with the Fourth of July Parade scene in Providence, Rhode Island vs. the opening with FDR in the Oval Office? Defend your answer.  I think with it opening in the Oval Office,  we get to see where Cohan is going. I personally liked that better than starting out with when he was born.  Even though it's pretty cool that he was born on the 4th of July.  

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During the very beginning of the clip as Cohan walks up the stairs with Roosevelt's butler there are portraits of the presidents to give a hint of how American's should take pride in their history of strong leadership. Including President Roosevelt to prove that he is a good leader and he understands patriotism. The dialogue influences American morale by showing how patriotic music can unite people during times of war. If the film opened up with the parade instead there wouldn't be any context as to what is going on and who is first being introduced in the film. Starting in the Oval Office helps set up a scene of how Cohan's life began.

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I didn't read all messages but did anyone notice in FDR's office. The paintings and a model in a glass holder were all some kind of ships. I couldn't tell what the paintings on the wall up the stairs were but people mentioned that they were of former Presidents so I will look for that when I watch this week. I liked the patriotic parade clip in the beginning when I watched the Daily Dose for the reasons other said. I think it helps set up the rest of the film and comes round to the end of the film. Looking forward to watching this. Loved the scene in Holiday Inn where Bing Crosby's opening number for the 4th has the film clip of FDR and military. It is a great film clip they came up with. One of my favorite all time films!

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Hello everyone. I am several days behind due to work and life commitments.  But trying to squeeze this class in whenever I get the chance, and enjoying it very much!

Yankee Doodle Dandy is one of my absolute favorites, as is James Cagney. Everything about his performance in this film touches me very deeply. I feel that Cagney is trying with every fiber of his being to do justice to George M. Cohan's remarkable life and career. But there is more in his performance - a quality of wanting to boost American morale during World War II. Cagney is so true and joyous in his portrayal of Cohan and his exhuberance and optimism completely elevate the film. I watch it every Fourth of July and it's a favorite of my husband as well.

The film starts with Cagney and the White House butler climbing the tall staircase to meet Franklin Delano Roosevelt in the Oval Office. As they do so, they pass many portraits of past presidents, calling to mind the history of America in one fast moment. The very fact that they are ascending the stairs has a feeling of optimism. We are elevated by the fast paced story and the wonderful performances of the film and never really come down from that until the end of the film. In this way, the film makes the audience feel swept up in a feeling of joy and patriotism. In the Fourth of July scene that follows the White House meeting, we are taken back in time to 1878 - a more innocent and peaceful time for Americans. The American flags are everywhere. The film works so well because Americans were experiencing World War II and it reminds the audience of American values and spirit.

When Cohan (Cagney) meets with the president, their conversation is full of references to American patriotism. Cohan reminisces that he was "always carrying a flag in a parade or following one", to which the president replies "you carry your love of country like a flag right out in the open." The fact that this conversation is taking place between the president and someone who considers himself a regular American is a very powerful message to all Americans in World War II. It says that each of them is important, that their love of country will make a difference, and that it is needed now more than ever.

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The scene was designed to promote American values as in his walking up the stairs the portraits of previous presidents hang on the walls, the Butler is referring to the song The Grand Old Flag that Cohen wrote and sang earlier, the president's office has a flag, several pictures of ships, and possibly the Mayflower to warships from WWII.

Also, Cohen reflects upon his father being proud to fight in the Civil War on the Norths side and refers to liking parades, and being proud Irish Americans and on the 4th of July at one of those parades in 1878, his father had to rush from performing to attend to his birth.  Cohen "I was a pretty cocky kid, a regular Yankee Doodle Dandy, always carrying a flag in a parade or following one."

The dialogue that reflects patriotism:

Roosevelt, "You Irish Americans you carry your love of country like a flag right out in the open."

Cohen, "I got that from my father, he ran away to the Civil War when he was 13, the proudest kid in the whole state of Massassechuets."

The film worked better as biographical with the opening from the end. The background information helps the audience understand where his patriotism began.

 

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Describe how the scenes in today’s Daily Dose were designed to promote American values for audiences during World War II. Be specific. Refer to props, set design, settings, etc. in your answer.

The first scene showcases the Presidents (and our historic tradition) as the two men climb the stairs lined with their portraits towards the Oval Office. 

The second scene in the Oval Office is full of displays of historic sailing ships - pictures on the walls, miniatures under glass - and American flags. My guess is this is meant to emphasize the glory of the American Navy in light of the recent destruction of the Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor.

The flashback sequence of a 4th of July parade theoretically in Providence, R.I. (if you choose to ignore the California mountains looming over a town that is actually flat) highlight a street lined with American flags - a traditional American town with classic 19th century wood frame commercial buildings.

Listen carefully to the dialogue in these scenes. In what ways does the dialogue and/or the screenplay work to boost American morale? Quote specific lines of dialogue in your response.

The theme of all the dialogue seems to me to building a sense of unity and commonality shared by all Americans - blacks, Irish, women and men, Presidents and working folk (again, if you consider George M. Cohan to be working folk (which I do)). The conversation between the black servant and Cohan recalls a long history of service to Presidents Roosevelt and the country by the servant who agrees with Cohan that the song "Grand Old Flag" is just as relevant in the 40's as in the early part of the 20th century.

In the Oval Office, there is strong agreement between Cohan and Roosevelt over their shared apprehension and understanding of the dire circumstances facing the country. "Don't worry about it. We understand each other perfectly." Roosevelt goes on and expresses his admiration for Irish Americans and their role in fighting for their shared values as Americans. Roosevelt discusses the flag and Cohan's own reverence for it (more specifically, the ideals the flag represents). Again, as noted in my response to #1, the dialogue works to reinforce the unity, but now within the context of a melting pot of people from different backgrounds sharing the ideals of liberty and freedom represented by the flag.

It's probably a stretch to suggest that the backstage scene with the senior Cohan also builds on this unity by the statement "My wife never held up a show in her life." But, I guess I'll go there and accept this as proof of the overall premise - one for all and all for one. Maybe.

Since this is the opening of a biographical musical, how differently do you feel this film would be if it opened with the Fourth of July Parade scene in Providence, Rhode Island vs. the opening with FDR in the Oval Office? Defend your answer.

The use of flashback to tell a biography seems to be a oft-used tool to frame history. I would argue though that beginning with the 4th of July parade would create a slower introduction into the story of Cohan because you're basically making a decision to let the story evolve. By creating the flashback structure, the director quickly immerses you into the patriotic nature of Mr. Cohan's life work by immediately establishing a context to build the story. 

As a total aside, this is one of my favorite films and I'm not much given to flag-waving nationalism. But, for me, the movie works so well that I just had to add it to my personal DVD collection some time back. 

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1. As Cohan is being led up the stairs, you see paintings of former Presidents that to Americans represent American values - especially George Washington, which is the very last painting we see at the top of the stairs. Setting the flashback scene during a July 4th parade allows the American flag to be put on full display and to demonstrate the patriotism of Americans. 

2. During Cohan's conversation with FDR, the President brings up Cohan's life-long patriotism and praises Irish American's devout allegiance to their country. Cohan admits that he always had a flag in hand and also references his family's patriotism with the anecdote about his ancestor that ran off and joined the Union Army at 13.

3. I think that opening the biographical music with the FDR conversation in the Oval Office frames the movie and gives it context. If it had began with the Fourth of July Parade in Rhode Island instead, the audience would not have the background knowledge of Cohan and the audience may think the movie is about his father instead. It also sets up the movie to seem more like Cohan is reflecting on his life and telling his story to FDR which makes it seem more natural rather than a straight-up biographical film.

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Describe how the scenes in today’s Daily Dose were designed to promote American values for audiences during World War II. Be specific. Refer to props, set design, settings, etc. in your answer.

Equality, unity and the pursuit of happiness. Good ol red white and blue. From the lovely parade to the the Oval Office. The veterans where loved and hero’s. More important than the president himself. It promoted we’re all in this together. 

Listen carefully to the dialogue in these scenes. In what ways does the dialogue and/or the screenplay work to boost American morale? Quote specific lines of dialogue in your response.

Melting Pot, no prejudice behaviors. One could even stage as the president and be thanked. Good hearted America. The entire dialog is set at promoting American values of the times. Fight for your country.

Since this is the opening of a biographical musical, how differently do you feel this film would be if it opened with the Fourth of July Parade scene in Providence, Rhode Island vs. the opening with FDR in the Oval Office? Defend your answer.

It truly brought honor to all events in film. Beginning with commander and chief’s recognition to Cagney. It displays the memoirs of a man who with so much patriotism was recognized and favored by the president. It shows realism, couple people who love their country chatting the common ground of love, honor, dignity, and friendship for their country. Yeah, this doesn’t exist today. 

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1.  I agree with those who have referenced the "melting pot" concept.  We see the African-American butler leading the Irish-American Cohan up the steps past a gallery of Presidents while discussing "Grand Old Flag" then being led into FDR's office.  Another message is what the office decor conveys.  It is replete with props referencing the Navy.  Consider that on the backdrop of Pearl Harbor and the message of strength that is implied.

2.  What struck me most about the dialogue was Cohan's comment that an ancestor had run away at age 13 to join the Civil War and he was the "proudest kid in Massachusetts."  Nothing subtle about this message.  the greatest source of pride is serving your country.

3.  Starting the film with the Oval office scene and then flashing back gives a special reference to the next scene in Providence, RI.  It tells us why only Mr. Cohan of "Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Cohan" is performing and why he is rushing out after his show.  I doubt that the meaning would have been as clear if the film started there.  It was intreresting to note the fact that the cast and crew were all behind Jerry Cohan as he left the theater.  The theme of unity in a time of war seems essential.

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  1. Describe how the scenes in today’s Daily Dose were designed to promote American values for audiences during World War II. Be specific. Refer to props, set design, settings, etc. in your answer.

In the opening sequence, as the two characters ascend the White House staircase, you can see the historical portraits lining the stairs; the portraits are lit, where the stairs are not...it pulls your visual focus to America's founding fathers

  1. Listen carefully to the dialogue in these scenes. In what ways does the dialogue and/or the screenplay work to boost American morale? Quote specific lines of dialogue in your response.

If trying to reinforce the idea of "The Great American Melting Pot", The President says, "That's what I love about 'You Irish' you wear your love for your country out in the open." as if he's trying to encourage the audience to feel more nostalgic about their own roots.  The flashback to the Fourth of July parade is a giant love-fest for America. There's not a corner of the screen that DOESN'T hold a flag

  1. Since this is the opening of a biographical musical, how differently do you feel this film would be if it opened with the Fourth of July Parade scene in Providence, Rhode Island vs. the opening with FDR in the Oval Office? Defend your answer.

So, as a biographical film, it would make logical sense to begin in chronological order.  However, as this still follows the formula of a musical, the sequence that flashes back to the past inserts an element of the "fantastical" into the historical framework presented on screen.  It's almost a blending of the "fantasy" musical and the "backstage" musicals of the early 20s.  If the film had been edited in chronological order, the musical itself would feel more like a drama with the occasional musical number tossed in.

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1.  The scene begins with him getting to meet the President of the United States.  He tells him the story of his childhood.  There is a lot of flag waving, parades, crowds of people cheering.  They joke around about naming George Cohan after George Washington. 

2.  The butler reminisces that George Cohan was singing and dancing "all about that grand old flag."  Cohan wrote patriotic tunes.  FDR asks him "Well hello there, how's my double?"  He is referring to Cohan playing him in a role. So there is an emphasis on patriotism, portraying presidents, patriotic songs, parades, etc. 

3.  I think that this gives it a narrative set-up and reason for George Cohan to be narrating his life.  It also adds to the patriotism of the movie. 

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1. There are many things in the scene that promote American values, some are very obvious and others bit more subtle. The obvious would be the White House setting, the conversation of Cohan's up bringing and talk of serving the country in different forms. The more subtle hints would be items such as Cohn's flag pin and the tittle of his plays.

2. The lines referencing Cohan's life long work of his patriotic performances were very moral boosting, to see a man who dedicated his life to expressing to the world the love of his country. One line in the scene " A regular Yankee Doodle Dandy. Always carrying a flag in a parade or following one." "I hope you haven't outgrown the habit." "Not a chance." I found that bit of dialog to be the most inspirational in that scene.

3. It still would have been a great movie but possible not as great. It is hard to judge because we have all the seen the original opening scene and it is difficult to imagine an alternate opening scene. I think it mite have been to abrupt if they would have opened with the 4th of July Parade scene. I like how the scene with the president seamlessly eases into the flash back.  

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American values/patriotism are definitely promoted through the use of props and set. We watch as Conan ascends a staircase with portraits of the presidents on the wall, until he gets to the Oval Office (which features a large flag). In addition to the Oval Office scene, we also see a Fourth of July parade with hundreds of people waving flags.

The dialogue also works to boost morale. For example, the servant remarks that the song "Grand Old Flag" is "just as good today as ever." Roosevelt remarks that he admires Cohan's love of country and the flag.

I that think opening with a scene in the Oval Office vs the parade hints that Cohan will become someone important and powerful. 

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I remember when I first watched this film. I found it to be such an epic story because is spanned one mans lifetime. In this scene set in the White House, Cohan is walking up the stairs surrounded by painting of former Presidents. You can feel how Cohan is encased in walls rimming with patriotic symbolism. He then walks into the Oval Office and speaks to President Roosevelt and you can see the American flag behind him as well as on him in the form of a pin.

I find it interesting that the President mentions that Cohan is Irish American which I think is to remind Americans that although we may come from other places it is in American where we experience true freedom. 

I enjoyed the flashback of the fourth of July as a flashback. I like that Cohan was retelling and sharing a personal story about patriotism in the company of the President of the United States.

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DAILY DOSE OF DELIGHT #5 (FROM YANKEE DOODLE DANDY)

"And when my time is up, have I done enough?"

(from Hamilton's "Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Tells Your Story?")

George M. Cohan's biography is quickly associated with America's story.  The president summoned him to the White House at 9 pm where he's greeted by a butler who stayed late to show his admiration for his song, "You're a Grand Old Flag" from his play, George Washington Jr..  FDR calls him his "double" because Cohan is playing him in I'd Rather Be Right.  Then we flashback to a July 4th parade (where flags abound) when Cohan was born and segue into a born-with-sawdust-in-my-veins scene.  (Who writes this stuff?)

 

 

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Describe how the scenes in today’s Daily Dose were designed to promote American values for audiences during World War II. Be specific. Refer to props, set design, settings, etc. in your answer.

The walk past historic portraits, the flag waving crowds celebrating past military campaigns, the reference to the current numbers of stars on the flag and the assurance that more would come, promote the idea of America as a country that is strong, deeply rooted in its history while looking forward to a successful and prosperous future.

 

Listen carefully to the dialogue in these scenes. In what ways does the dialogue and/or the screenplay work to boost American morale? Quote specific lines of dialogue in your response.

"You carry your love of country like a flag, right out in the open." "I inherited that . . ."  I idea that a love of country is a source of pride handed down from one generation to the next is, to me, a basic foundation of the American national identity.

Since this is the opening of a biographical musical, how differently do you feel this film would be if it opened with the Fourth of July Parade scene in Providence, Rhode Island vs. the opening with FDR in the Oval Office? Defend your answer.

Starting with the somber present, and then going to the bright joyous past, reflects how most people describe their lives.  We tend to focus on the bright and shiny idealized past, and play down the recent events.  Especially when that present is troubled.

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1. From Cohan’s  flag pin, to the portraits of American presidents, even down to the paintings and models of ships in the Oval Office, this clip oozes patriotism. This continues with all of the flags waving and the musical selection played during the parade scene. The idea that a regular American immigrant, or son of an immigrant, can work his way up to greatness and meet the president is also one that reflects American values. 

2. The dialogue in this clip almost makes it seem like a war promotion reel that would be shown before the film. The butler saying that Teddy Roosevelt sang “You’re a Grand Old Flag” in the bathtub, Cohan and Roosevelt both saying they wish they knew all the answers, Cohan making a better president than Roosevelt himself, reminiscing about old times and Cohan being a regular Yankee Doodle Dandy, talking about Irish-Americans carrying their love of country out in the open like a flag, and Americans being optimistic and expectant -  all of this would have served to comfort and reassure the folks watching the film that even though the way ahead during war time was unsure, America would fight and prevail.

3. I think if the film had started at the parade, it would have lost something in the telling. The idea of Cohan looking back and reflecting on his life certainly adds to the autobiographical element, but it also gives it a certain gravitas that I don’t feel it would have had otherwise. Beginning with the parade and going into the scene with Cohan’s father immediately would have made it feel more lighthearted, whereas adding the scene looking back with the president shows how far Cohan, and America itself, has come and adds a dramatic element of reserve and nostalgia that would have been well regarded at the beginning of a war. 

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1. The White House is depicted as grand. It is our White House. Huge portraits of past presidents line the walls impressing the exceptionalism of our fore fathers. Walking into the Oval Office, an entire navy is depicted in the decor providing honor, pride, and remembrance of Pearl Harbor. The American flag is prominent and is lit (it is not in shadow). Notice the president's clock is set at 9:00 - the first attack at Pearl Harbor came at 7:53 a.m. and the second at 8:55 a.m. Notice FDR's desk is clear, except for one piece of paper. Notice the atmosphere is calm. All of this assures the audience the president is aware but has everything under control.  

Then, there is FDR. We know he had polio and was careful to hide from the public his inability to walk, but he is mobile and stands here to greet Cohan. The gesture gives the impression our president is great, sure footed, and capable.

 

2. American values, right down to the opening lines mentioning Cohan's great George Washington play against a backdrop of the portraits of former presidents. The dialogue sets Cohan up as a national treasure, someone all Americans can admire for his work. And his song on the flag, a profound American symbol, "is just as good today as it ever was."  The banter between FDR and Cohan is a remembrance of a patriotic little kid "a Yankee Doodle Dandy, always carrying a flag in a parade or following one." Then FDR makes reference to the patriotism of Irish Americans - perhaps in a nod to bring people together (there could be a more direct reference here but my history is a little fuzzy, though I know there was a feeling up to JFK whether Irish Catholics could be loyal Americans with their recognition of the supremacy of the Pope). FDR is proud Cohan spent his career "telling the other 47 states how great [America] is." The scene then fades to Providence (defined:"the protective care of God or of nature as a spiritual power" (Google search)), Rhode Island and a patriotic parade.

 

3. If the scene were to open with the parade, I honestly feel I would be lost. I do not know who Cohan was, though, I suppose he was famous in his time. It would take me a moment to understand what the film is about.  The opening with FDR provides valuable setting by providing the background story.  Additionally, the scene in the Oval Office is solemn, quiet, and respectful. The scene in the Oval Office provides a moment of silence considering the emotion evoked by Pearl Harbor. A parade is loud and chest-pounding, as well as being a celebration. Is beginning with a celebration appropriate just after Pearl Harbor? I don't know if the audience would be receptive viewers if it started with the parade.

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1. As they go up the staircase in the opening of the scene, the camera follows the pictures of the presidents on the wall along with the characters. The setting of the White House generally is very patriotic, as it is kind of considered the epitome of American government. The ships on the wall of Roosevelt's room are a reminder that it's wartime. 

2. There's a strong emphasis on patriotic behavior and glorification of the United States. The screenplay particularly emphasizes the patriotism of Cohen and his performances: "You was just singing and dancing all about the Grand Ol' Flag." "Regular Yankee Doodle Dandie. Always carrying a flag or parade or following one." "You carry your love of country like a flag, right out in the open." 

3. Opening with the White House scene suggests how patriotism can get you far- Cohen himself was a Yankie Doodle Dandy, and it got him to the White House! It makes the country and its government feel more accessible and closer to the people, something which would probably boost patriotic spirit and make people feel connected to the cause they were sacrificing so much for. 

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1.  Films like 'Yankee Doodle Dandy' or 'On The Town' depicted American values in a more cheerful light, during the time of events of WWII was going on.  In this film more specifically you have the Hollywood set of the White House, with the external shot in the beginning and the end, in Washington DC.  Plus, besides all the propaganda (in this case needed propaganda), that was being spread on the radio programs of the day...and the posters that were put out around cities or towns, in this movie the American spirit is shown to not only represent America but the patriotism of Cohan and Americans.

2.  The key to the script of 'Yankee Doodle Dandy' is that the dialogue is designed to show the American spirit in full.  This film came out in '42.  The year after the United States entered the war.  So the words that we hear are, the words most Americans were using back then.  Boosting the cause by expressing the strength this country has i the ring fighting foreign battles.  The line spoken by George's father expresses the fundamental nuclear family structure that was being formed by society.   

3.  It wouldn't be much different at all.  If it began with Rhode Island, than ended in FDR's oval office, it would still be the same movie.  You'd get George's life from beginning to end either way.  I guess they started with FDR's office because it would be a nice transition for George to tell the story to the audience. 

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This movie has always been a favorite of mine, and I make sure I watch it every 4th of July!

  1. Describe how the scenes in today’s Daily Dose were designed to promote American values for audiences during World War II. Be specific. Refer to props, set design, settings, etc. in your answer. Aside from the plethora of US flags and banners, they carefully show pictures of presidents as Cagney ascends the staircase up to the Oval Office. There sure were a ton of paintings of ships in the room, over the fireplace!
  2. Listen carefully to the dialogue in these scenes. In what ways does the dialogue and/or the screenplay work to boost American morale? Quote specific lines of dialogue in your response. References were made to "Republicans" (FDR was a Democrat) and “That’s what I like about you Irish Americans, you carry your love for your country around with you like a flag" was a direct reference connecting one main segment of American society to the positive influence in American patriotism. 
  3. Since this is the opening of a biographical musical, how differently do you feel this film would be if it opened with the Fourth of July Parade scene in Providence, Rhode Island vs. the opening with FDR in the Oval Office? Defend your answer.  I think having the opening scene where Cohen is explaining his beginnings to FDR, "cuts to the chase" and alleviates the film watcher from guessing and putting it into context, also "easing" into the full-blown patriotic symbolism of the movie (rather than just "blasting" it in).

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This movie is steeped in American tradition during this time. Flags are flying. Parades are marching. Banners everywhere. All conversation points to being patriotic. Of course, most movies during this period are all about the public supporting the war effort. 

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Q1) Lots of flag waving in this whole movie.  The Cohen songs that were most patriotic were the big highlights/dance/song numbers.  People couldn't help leaving the theater and feeling pride in their country.  I wouldn't be surprised to hear that every admission ticket also included a free flag.

Plus, when the movie starts and Cohen goes to meet FDR the use of the pictures of the past presidents is extremely important.  It is to remind everyone of our long history and what we could lose if we don't win the war.  You can't say enough about Cohen's birth scene.  Fireworks, flags, a parade...what is more American than that. This movie was designed, top to bottom with getting people excited to be an American.

Q2) "It seems it always happens. Whenever we get too high-hat and too sophisticated for flag-waving, some thug nation decides we're a push-over all ready to be blackjacked. And it isn't long before we're looking up, mighty anxiously, to be sure the flag's still waving over us."  This quote from the movie says a lot about what the movie was meant to do...get us to be flag wavers again.

Q3)  I like the way the movie opens.  If the movie had opened with the Providence, RI scene, I think it would not have had the same impact.  Starting with a scene in the White House and Cohen being there starts us right out on a journey of history.  This was designed to give us reminders of what makes the USA great and Cohen great.  It lets the movie goer think of how Cohen is intertwined in US history. This movie was designed to get our patriotic juices flowing and if it had started with his birth rather than the Oval Office if would have lacked the impetus to get us thinking from the very start about waving our flags and music that makes us feel strong as Americans.

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1. In the Oval Office all of the pictures are of ships. There was a ship on the mantle and even a clock on the desk looked like the wheel of a ship. I don’t think that any of the ships were war ships. But it made me think of over seas and sailors. In the street there was a parade that makes me think of home town celebration and community. There was a hardware store that almost every town has. And almost everywhere there was a U.S. flag. And the address on the building was 1776. So it makes you think the 4th of July and our country’s freedom.

2. Even though it was president Roosevelt talking to George Cohan an actor and songwriter. President Roosevelt said “I can remember you and your family very well the Four Cohans.”  This sounds like they was neighbors and one of the moved away. Roosevelt even reminisced that he saw them “while I was attending school in Boston.” Which makes it about the good old times that they shared together. It gives a feeling like we are all friends and neighbors keeping track of one another and helping each other out.

3. The Oval Office scene was a cozier more personable feel. The butler greeted George almost as an old friend reminiscing about seeing George on the stage. Then President Roosevelt did the same bringing up George’s family. The parade was outside, loud, bright, crowded. It makes you feel more awake and energized. But to start this movie with seeing George well liked by the President and the butler. Talking of good old times, made you want to like him too. If it opened with the parade scene it would take longer for George to win you over.

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1.  The scene promotes American values like love for family and patriotism.  We see the White House, the President, the flags, and the military.

2.  Shows and parades boost the American morale and this is evident in the dialogue when Mr. Cohan says he's "always carrying a flag in a parade or following one" and he mentions the Civil War and the president says his family have been giving shows all over 47 states in this great country.  Then the story begins with the 4th of July parade and a show.

3.  It would've been different because of the fact that he ends up talking to the president in the White House is proof that his work has helped Americans and he's given this honor.  This is not just about a family giving a variety show but what it means to the people, how it boosts their morale.    

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