Dr. Vanessa Theme Ament

DAILY DOSE OF DELIGHT #6 (From TWO JUDY GARLAND FILMS)

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1. I honestly don't remember my first Judy Garland movie - she was just always there. Before cable The Wizard of Oz would only be on once a year, and we would always watch that. I also recall being 5 or 6 and having my mom wake me up in the middle of the night just to watch Meet Me in St. Louis. (again, pre-cable!)

2)This was initially a hard question for me to consider, since both of the clips/movies are ones I'm familiar with. But, thinking about the comments written by Prof. Ament about the scenes I tried to look at them with fresh eyes. In both scenes you see Garland is not afraid to get 'mussed up' - she's dressed like a hobo in the Easter Parade song - dirty face and teeth, clothes with holes, etc. As she sings and dances in "For Me and My Gal" her hair gets loose. As an actor she didn't stop the scene asking it to be fixed, she didn't demand that her hair be perfect - It's more real that way. 

I had also never thought about the piano playing. knowing that she couldn't really play/read music certainly makes one watch the scene differently. She obviously rehearsed to make it as realistic as possible. 

3) Meet Me In St. Louis came after For Me and My Gal. Her ability to sell every song and scene in that movie was discussed, but it still comes to mind.  I also thought of the finale in Summer Stock - which showed a different side/style to Garland - especially when watching her throughout that particular film.  Her storytelling songs and scenes in A Star is Born also come to mind. Even in the lost footage scenes of Star is Born - when we're just hearing her and not seeing the action, you get her ability to capture the audience's imagination. 

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1. Like so many others, my first Judy Garland movie was The Wizard of Oz. I would come home from kindergarten and watch it every day, yet never tired of it. I think I was envious of her in the film, because she got to go on such an amazing adventure. Even though she was young, she still seemed so much older than me. She probably helped start my dreams of acting and performing.

2. I've seen both films many, many times, so I already knew she was capable of being a comedian on top of a phenomenal singer. Easter Parade is a personal favorite, as it has so many amazingly talented people. I love her chemistry with Fred Astaire, especially compared to Gene Kelly. It might help that she was older in Easter Parade, compared to looking so young in For Me and My Gal. It makes it more realistic that she would be in a relationship with someone like him.

3. Meet Me in St. Louis is an excellent showcase for her. The excitement she gets through on the trolley, to the melancholy in her voice during the holidays, it's very clear how her character is feeling at that moment. I love her appearance in Summer Stock, as well. Even though it was only a few years after these films, she seems so much more mature. Part of me wonders if her personal demons and problems helped her to flesh out later characters, feeling like she had more to prove and more internal turmoil to drive her.

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On 6/12/2018 at 12:17 PM, Warne's Brat said:

I love The Pirate precisely because it's 'goofy.'  I think it's hilarious!  The over the top acting and the screenplay are the reasons I'm drawn to it, whereas the songs, despite being Cole Porter, are only a secondary attraction - and sometimes, dare I say, skippable... 

If anything told Judy it was time to move on from the MGM musical, in my opinion that would have to be Summer Stock.  It's got some lovely moments, but that plot is really outdated for 1950 and it feels like a step backward for both Gene and Judy. 

I also find The Pirate goofy and endearing as a result — although I still am confused or something by the HUGE similarities between “Be A Clown” and Singin’ In the Rain’s “Make Em Laugh.” Maybe it’s just me, as even Cole Porter never seemed too fussed by it.

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20 hours ago, Dkmpruett said:

BTW, did anyone notice how much Fred Astaire looked like Dick Van Dyke in the clip from Easter Parade. Made me think I need to look at DVD's dancing in Mary Poppins again.

I didn’t get DVD personally until you mentioned it but YES! I just thought that black wig made him more attractive ?

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I cannot remember if my first Judy Garland picture was The Wizard of Oz or The Pirate — but I knew she was extraordinary, even at my young age. I appreciated watching the clips from Easter Parade and For Me and My Gal because I was reminded of what a gift Judy was to us, as I recently I have been thinking of her as simply Liza’s mother. Shame on me ? especially when the musical number I would personally like to perform myself in an alternate world is “Get Happy” from Summer Stock.

 

 

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Like everyone else the first time I saw JudyGarland was in Wizard of Oz. At home growing up I never really saw any other films starring her. No channels like TCM back then. We had many records of hers at home and I remember loving the songs she sang from the musicals not knowing they were from her movies. After seeing That's Entertainment and the clips I became a fan seeing them all many times. My Mom loved Harvey Girls so there we woild be watching her dance sing and defend her honor in the wild west. Love the scene with the steaks.I love the clip from the early movies where she sang to a photo of Clark Gable. Terrific. In later years Summer Stock has become one of my favorites with the Howdy Neighbir song, and the idea of putting on a show. There is no one finer than Judy and she deserves the greatest accolades one can receive. The end of Easter Parade when she and Fred promenade and sing it always makes me smile when the head up the stairs come back and go out to show the world they are in love. Judy Garland what a Star!!!!

 

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As a child of the Fifties, my first exposure to Judy was holiday TV screenings of "The Wizard of Oz". Even as a child, I noticed how convincingly she stood up to Elvira Gulch, how she gently persisted as her family and friends were too busy to help with her troubles (walking on the fence while she chatted with Zeke was a brilliant scene), and how realistically she related to Toto (yes, and Toto, too). 

Then, there is "Over the Rainbow". The song fist so many interpretations: the yearning for independence, for identity, for lifting of pain and sorrow. And Judy does it so gently in this performance.

Like Masscommike, my next exposures to Judy were on her TV show in the early 1960's. (Though I am a fan of Bonanza, it is hard to forgive it killed The Judy garland Show and The Danny Kaye Show.) Watching those skits and concert performances, one couldn't help but see the acting that went into her singing performances. You almost couldn't believe the song had been written by  or about anyone else. Real in that moment. So, as an adult, when i began to encounter Judy in other movies - musical or not - I was prepared from those TV concerts for what an astounding actress she was.

I must say though the entire TCM day devoted to Judy prompted by the lecture and Bits of Delight helped me appreciate how she progressed from playing a talented girl (WofOz, Mickey & Judy), to a warm, self-confident woman ("Me and My Gal", "Meet Me in St Louis", "The Hardy Girls", "Easter Parade" through "In the Good Old Summertime"). In particular I noted her facial expressions during the two Delight numbers. She is winking at the audience through the entire "Swells" number - and that clowning at the end over who would be last on stage was priceless. Her dance movements were more exaggerated than Astaire's. that seems tone his way - and her hobo clowning fits the piece so well. One of the marvels of the "Me and My Gal" number is how smoothly Judy moves from spectator, to piano accompanist, to duet singer, to acting out the song, to being courted within the performance, to elating in the multi-layered experience at the end.  I think her profound singing, acting, and acting- within-singing. I think this culminates in the already remarked upon awareness take after "three or four or five --- or more" BANG - Jo (Judy) shows with this facial expression that she realizes harry (Gene) is suggesting yet another layer of partnership.

 

Of Judy's later films, as have many others, I am been mesmerized by her performance of "The Man That Got Away", but I would point to two other scenes from "A Star Is Born". About 2/3 into the movie, Esther comes home from the studio dead tired and finds Norman moping. She summons up the energy for a frenetic parody of the movie she's making and soothes him for a time. But at the conclusion of the scene, you see from their body language that she and Norman both realize she can't keep him afloat (forgive me) alone. After Norman's tragedy, there is a scene when a studio friend stops by the set to see how Esther is managing with adjustments to life without Norman. Her body language is dejected and immobile, her speaking voice is vulnerable - and just as she is saying she doesn't know how to go on -- the call to return to the set comes. Esther drags herself back into the scene - - and only when the music playback starts does she begin to pull herself back into there movie character -- the first time I saw it I thought she wasn't going to be able to do the take -- but the switch goes on, a figurative 20,000 Volts of electricity surge through her face, body and voice -- and the happy, energetic movie number is a "Print! Copy!". Pagliacci and Camile, step aside! Wow!

 

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1 hour ago, janey said:

I also find The Pirate goofy and endearing as a result — although I still am confused or something by the HUGE similarities between “Be A Clown” and Singin’ In the Rain’s “Make Em Laugh.” Maybe it’s just me, as even Cole Porter never seemed too fussed by it.

Yeah... I think the story there is that SITR directors Stanley Donen and Gene Kelly told Arthur Freed (the producer who happened to write most of the songs in SITR back in the 20s with Nacio Herb Brown) that they needed a song LIKE "Be a Clown" for Donald O'Connor's showstopper.  When they got "Make 'Em Laugh," they realized that it was more or less the same song, but went with it, anyway.  I'm a bit hazy on the details, but I imagine a citation could be found somewhere.  Anyway, as I recall, Cole Porter did notice it, but was too much of a gentleman to make a big deal out of it.  As far as the recorded number goes, I infinitely prefer "Make 'Em Laugh," but that's not to take anything away from Cole Porter.

 

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Like most others "Wizard of Oz" is the movie first movie i remember Judy Garland in and most remarkable talent she had at such an early age.

Summer Stock is one of my favorites and i feel it shows Judy as a mature woman and so relaxed in her role as if she really is that person.  Her acting seemed effortless to me as it did in Wizard of Oz.  

In the movie A Star is Born Judy belts out the song "one man women" it doesn't matter how many times you have seen this you cannot help but watch her sing the song again.  She is like a magnet when she sings.  Her heart and soul are in her songs.

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The very first film I saw with Judy Garland was The Wizard of Oz. I guess this is the same for many but it's perhaps her most iconic role. How can it not be. For some one so young at the age of 16 years old, she has the most amazing voice and screen presence. She doesn't play the cutesy cutesy young person, there's a maturity about her without acting adult. There are so many wonderful characteristics to Dorothy but honestly, I felt like I was watching Judy Garland and not Dorothy. She completely owned the role and it would be impossible to imagine the movie with anyone else.

From watching the clips and a few of her films, it's easy to see how she grew as a performer. I was surprised to read that she was not a trained dancer nor could play piano or read music. And she also grew as an actress. She's cute and funny in her younger roles, but to see her later films shows that she was a natural talent. Sadly, we don't see too many child actors who were able to make that transition to more mature and even serious roles. I've always been a fan of hers, but having learned more about her has really made me appreciate her even more as a well rounded and extremely talented performer.

A Star is Born is the film that comes to mind when I think of Garland's ability to capture an audience's imagination through song. Just the raw emotions she's feeling makes the audience feel along with her. That is not easy to do and she does it so easily. But it's also her many performances on The Judy Garland Show that shows how connecting with her audiences comes so easily. I think her performances are less restricting than they would be on film, and we got to see more of her doing a variety of songs and skits. So much more to enjoy.

 

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I agree with so many classmates here that Summer Stock and A Star is Born really showcase Judy's talents as a more mature actress and singer. But when I read that discussion question I kept thinking of moments, not films, that just blow you away: Better Luck Next Time from Easter Parade, I'm Always Chasing Rainbows from Ziegfeld Girl, The Man that Got Away from A Star is Born. The films themselves may or may not be the ultimate Judy vehicles. But those moments make them totally worth it.

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    No surprise here, my first Judy Garland film was "The Wizard of Oz" (1939).  I saw it on television every year, starting in the early 1960's. We watched it as a family on our black and white TV. Years later, I saw it in color (and sepia) and was enchanted again. She was amazing in that role as the little lost girl, with the big voice, who was trying to get back home. Later in the 1960's, her personification in this movie was in stark contrast with her widely publicized personal problems and her sad death.  Frankly, I was drawn to young Judy, but put off by what she had become. As a young movie buff in the 1970's, I considered her overrated and did not seek out her later films. As I have aged, my opinion of her has changed for the better. I have come to appreciate the incredible talent that she had and have enjoyed her many films.  I also have listened to her on many old radio shows and have found her endearing, entertaining and spontaneously humorous in these live broadcasts.  My admiration for her abilities have increased again, as the notes point out her near-perfect impersonation of a skilled piano player. It looked so good, that I assumed she was actually playing! Many of her later roles showcase her incredible ability to capture an audience's attention. Two that come to mind are "The Pirate" (1948), with the great number "Be a Clown," and "Summer Stock" (1950), with the classic "Get Happy."

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1. The first Judy Garland movie I remember seeing was the Wizard of Oz. Call me terrible but when I was younger I always grew inpatient during Over the Rainbow I was waiting for the Oz sequence. I was in a hurry for her to leave Kansas! LOL And my first impression of her was she cried a lot in that movie. Don't get me wrong I loved the movie as a kid! Gladly my opinion changed over time! And yes I do love Over the Rainbow! 

2. With the clips and time I grew and fell in love with her personality. When I was in 8th Grade I saw Meet Me in St. Louis and her warmth and character won me over and I just needed to see more of her movies. When she sang she was completely sincere and real, it doesn't get much better than that. You really can't fake that! 

3. One movie that sticks out to me is The Harvey Girls. During that opening sequence of her on the train where she is singing about her hopes and dreams, she takes you places beyond that train ride. Another one that comes to my mind is the Born in a Trunk sequence in a Star is Born. She pours her soul into that sequence taking you every step of the way! 

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I'm about to commit Classic Movie Fandom suicide and admit that I am not a fan of Judy Garland. 

I still want to talk about her objectively so don't hate me too quickly. 

My first Judy Garland film was... like every other entry on this forum... The Wizard of Oz. I still admire the movie. I'll watch it from time to time. Currently childless but if I do have a family they will most likely watch this movie during childhood. The Wizard of Oz is iconic for many reasons but mainly for Judy; I cannot deny that her look and demeanor have set the standard for every adaptation of the Oz story. Would I be interested to have seen another small town songstress in the role? Yes. But I will accept that Judy proved capable of starring in a blockbuster hit and commanding audience attention at a young age when she was only a wee MGM studio player. 

I have said and will continue to say that Judy's roles were mainly her performing. She knew how to sing and wink at a live audience. I've read that she did vaudeville before being signed to MGM. I get the sense from her performances that she still sings and winks at the camera the same way she would with her vaudeville shows. Honestly, I do not see much of a talent in the Couple of Swells song, not even from Fred Astaire who I love. That's a simple choreograph number. Judy's "wit, charm, and physical comedy aptitude" are the same as Fred's and most of it could be simply applied because the director says so. Judy makes a big face, sings in tune, and flips her hands back and forth. I'm sorry but that doesn't impress me. 

Just when you think there may be no hope for me, I want to reassure you that I see talent in Judy from time to time. The For Me and My Gal clip was eye opening. I saw marks of a talented actor in the beginning of the scene. Judy seems relaxed when she suggests to play the piano. I didn't know Judy couldn't play piano in real life but you can't tell based off of her reactions. She sincerely looks like she is wanting to play sheet music she's never seen before while keep the attention of Gene Kelly. It seems that when her character's story is absent from a literal stage, Judy Garland, the actor, eases into a more believable persona. 

This doesn't apply all the time, however. Even in Meet Me in St. Louis, Judy is winking at that audience again. Esther does not have a stage unless it's her living room but she still makes every opportunity to exaggerate song over reality in The Trolley Song, Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas, and Over the Bannister. I've seen Meet Me in St. Louis many times and I am not a fan. 

Is there a movie that I haven't seen of Judy Garland that I may be impressed with? Most Likely. I've never seen For Me and My Gal so I'm adding that to the list. Was she exactly what the world needed amidst WWII? Most likely. She fit the bill for wholesome, sincere, and optimistic (all things I love). There was something about her that audiences in the 40s and audiences today find magnetic; they were inspired and they wanted more. But I cannot be swayed. I do not take pleasure in listening to her voice and I have yet to see a Judy Garland character that wows me. 

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1. The Wizard of Oz. She sang with emotion. She was able to express her feelings in her songs.

2. She isn't just one-dimensional musical performer. I see her maturing and being more versatile in her roles.

3. A Star is Born

 

 

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1. What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her?

I was a young girl, and my first time seeing Judy Garland was in 'The Wizard of Oz' (like probably everyone).  I actually thought it was a real story and was terrified of the tornado, very fearful for poor Dorothy.  When she sang, I wanted to be just like her -- unfortunately I can't sing a note that isn't off key.  I thought she was beautiful and so poised for being a young girl lost in a foreign place.  Her expressions and mannerisms  fit perfectly, like everything was effortless for her which is one big reason I thought it was real.  I figured no one could act that well. 

 

2. How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

I don't view her differently per say, but am reminded of things about her that amaze each time I watch her perform: How beautiful she is for one thing. I know she struggled with her weight and didn't consider herself a conventional beauty compared to some of the starlets of that day, but each time I see her she looks different as each character.  In this I am able to see a different facet of her beauty, both outer and inner. She literally beams in front of the camera and you can't take your eyes off her even if you try.  I am also amazed at how good she is at dancing. I honestly never really focused on her footwork too much, but seeing her next to two of the greats (Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire) I am in awe at how light and effortless she makes it look.  The only thing that compares to it is her voice. Her voice is not only soft and feminine at times, but strong and forceful, calling on all your emotions each time she sings a song.  I can't get enough of her, and am in awe at how talented she was.

 

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

I think the best at that would be 'A Star Is Born'.  It highlights not only her voice, but her acting ability.  It seems as if she sings unfettered, throwing everything she has into ever note.  The raw emotion on her face during certain scenes as well are a far cry from the little girl growing up before our eyes in such movies as 'The Wizard of Oz', the Andy Hardy movies, 'Meet Me In St. Louis', and 'The Harvey Girls'.  Because of this reason, the movie itself has a special place in my heart. Whenever I feel down or am feeling sorry for myself, I put 'A Star Is Born' on, and Judy commiserates with me in song and action as I watch the film.  Her powerful voice in each song, especially my favorite 'The Man That Got Away', just lets me know I am not alone at that moment.  Plus, where she doesn't have to share the stage really with another great song and dance actor, she really does shine for me in this one. She is the focal point, and she let's her audience know it.

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The first movie I saw Judy in was of course... The Wizard Of Oz. I loved how sweet and innocent she was and how she just wanted to get away from normal life. I've always had that want to escape reality; escape normalcy and see what was on the other side of the rainbow. I've always wanted to sound like her because she has such a unique voice that just grasps your attention.

I honestly don't view her any differently. She's always been a star no matter when genre of musicals she's performing in.

A Star Is Born is the clear answer because all of her performing abilities come together beautifully!

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1. As I'm sure it is for most people, the first film I remember seeing Judy Garland in is The Wizard of Oz. I remember being amazed at how such a deep and soulful voice could come out of someone as tiny as Judy. 

2. I am always happy to see Judy Garland exercise her comedic talents and her dancing - even though she isn't a trained dancer, you would never know. 

3. Her personal favorite film of mine, A Star is Born, demonstrates that she is just as good in a heart-wrenching romantic drama as she is in a comedic musical. Her performance of "The Man That Got Away" is, in my opinion, one of her best performances and perfectly demonstrates her ability to capture the audience's imagination as a storyteller through song.

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Not the first film I saw of hers, but the film that made me fall in love with Judy Garland was Babes in Arms (1939). I think I watched her and Mickey sing "Good Morning" three or four times before I finally got on with the rest of the movie. The penny dropped for me in the scene where she comes around the corner and sees Mickey kissing June Preisser. Her eyes well up with tears, she drops the glass of water, and runs away. I remember touching my computer screen and whispering "poor baby". At that point I developed the maternal instinct for Judy I feel most of her fans have. 

Mickey and Judy were my gateway drug into classical Hollywood obsession. It wasn't the first time I'd seen or even enjoyed a classic film, but it was the first time that I became keenly interested in the context of a film's production. I think this was partly because of how the film switches so quickly from adorable sweethearts to fascist parade, and partly because of how sweetly Mickey spoke of Judy on the intro to the DVD I was watching. The subsequent internet research rabbit hole I fell into on the subjects of the film's wartime context and Mickey and Judy's touching yet heartbreaking relationship still has me seven years on. 

I know her later movies are considered better showcases of her talents, but these will always be the best with me. She had the same pathos here at sixteen as she had in any of her later roles, like she was born with this broken wing. And I feel like Mickey always looks at her with so much adoration but like he's scared she's going to turn to dust at any second. We watch these movies now with the added pathos of retrospect that contemporary audiences didn't have. Every time I watch this movie I cry as Mickey runs after the bus pulling away with Judy crying in the window, only to be left in its dust holding her pin.

 

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Like many people, the first Judy Garland film I saw was "The Wizard of Oz." (I suspect that was one of the first films I saw, period. It was one of three movies we watched over and over at my grandma's house, along with "The Sound of Music" and "Mary Poppins" - musicals are in my blood.) As a kid, I always thought of her as a kid; it was kind of shocking to me to realize she was an adult in other musicals! I particularly remember being surprised when I found out that Liza Minnelli was her daughter, and seeing Liza in "Cabaret." Dorothy Gale and Sally Bowles seemed like two completely different people who would never be related. However, performances like the clip from "Easter Parade" show a different side of Garland. She is more animated and funnier than she ever got to be in "The Wizard of Oz," and you can see her range on display. The thread that does run through all of her performances, though, is her chemistry with her fellow performers. She was one of those truly gifted actors who can have chemistry with everybody - and probably even inanimate objects. 

I'm looking forward to diving deeper into Garland's filmography - even though it's sad when you realize she was only 47 when she died. Another wonderful star gone too soon!

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Of course the first Judy film that I can remember is The Wizard of Oz. To be honest I was so young that for some reason I thought she was Shirley Temple for the longest time. I had always felt like she came across as a bit uncomfortable in most roles that I had seen her in. In the two clips from the daily dose I feel like she plays on equal footing with her co-stars.

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1. What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her?

My very first Judy Garland film was, like many others, THE WIZARD OF OZ, which I first saw when I was a young child. I remember thinking Judy was relatable, and I could well understand her longing to get home. I thought she was really beautiful, too. To me she will always be Dorothy.

2. How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

I've gained a deeper appreciation of her talent. There was never anyone like Judy Garland. She was a true class act.

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

While I've never seen it myself, I've heard a lot about Judy's performance in A STAR IS BORN. Her acting ability and vocal range was at its absolute peak by that point in her career. She had a way of capturing the viewer's attention, and holding it. Her talent was unrivalled.

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My first Judy Garland film, like so many others, was Wizard of Oz when I was a child.   I remember crawling

under my seat when the wicked witch appeared in color.  

In later years, I've seen Meet Me in St. Louis on TCM and love that movie.   

 

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1. My first exposure to Judy Garland was watching "The Wizard of Oz" via good old-fashioned VHS tape when I was two, and to this day it is not only one of my top 10 favorite films, but also what I consider to be one of Judy's best performances. She always struck me as extremely genuine and real in both her singing and her acting abilities, and never failed to establish a palpable connection with the audience in everything she did, as though she were always performing live on stage rather than the comparatively disconnected medium of film. Very few people have that special charm and magnetism, but Judy Garland did. She had such an immense natural talent; it always saddens me to think of what a short, unhappy life she had, even though most of it was spent entertaining and lifting the spirits of others.

2. I've seen many of Judy Garland's post-"Oz" films, so I can't say my opinion of her has changed after viewing the clips. She was willing and able to do it all, just as effective as a comedienne as she was a dramatic actress, and while singing was where she excelled, I don't think anyone can fault her as a dancer.

3. I have not, unfortunately, seen any of her later films in their entirety, but "The Man That Got Away" from "A Star Is Born" has to be one of the best example's of Judy's ability to tell a story through song. While she was more of a singer-turned-actress than the other way around, she always acted each song more than just merely singing it. I look forward to seeing the entire film next week on TCM!

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