Dr. Vanessa Theme Ament

DAILY DOSE OF DELIGHT #6 (From TWO JUDY GARLAND FILMS)

357 posts in this topic

1.  I know I watched Wizard of Oz, but I was scared to death of the witch (poor Mr. Rogers couldn't even break my fright when he had Margaret Hamilton on his program and he showed how it was all make believe). Plus, those flying monkeys were downright creepy. Unfortunately, I've never been able to overcome my early reaction, so Wizard of Oz simply is not a movie I watch. For me, Judy Garland will forever be Esther Smith, in love with St. Louis and the boy next door. Meet Me in St. Louis is my favorite....and, my daughter's favorite insisting we watch it at the beginning of each Christmas season. She was cute, coming of age, with an idyllic family, still tomboyish and full of life. Her dance with Margaret O'Brien always makes me cry with joy. Judy Garland connected with the viewer with her sweetness, boldness, and ability to see the humor in herself.

2.  I now have an appreciation for the way Judy Garland openly, willingly, generously shared the stage with her co-star(s).  I have a fuller appreciation for her playfulness with the camera as a wink toward her audience.

3.  Well, my favorite, of course: Meet Me in St. Louis

Edited by PacNWFem
Grammer, spalling

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I first saw Judy Garland in The Wizard of Oz but that is not my favorite movie of hers.  I absolutely love her rendition of Get Happy in Summer Stock.  Her classic black outfit with the sexy legs are to die for and her singing is top notch.  Meet Me in St. Louis is probably my favorite all around film with Judy Garland.  Her interactions with Margaret O’Brien are just delightful and I laugh every time she flirts with “the boy next door” as she has him turn off the lights.  She really did have a sense of humor that just puts the viewer at ease.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1.What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her?

Wizard of Oz.  Based on my age and the content of the movie I thought she was like me - young, impressionable, life-loving.  Yet she was also very talented, and that was a role model I wanted and needed at that time.  While there was little dancing, her singing and acting skills were obvious yet delivered with such skill that they seemed second nature. 

2.How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously? 

While much older and more experienced, Judy still exhibited some of the same characteristics that I first saw in the Wizard of Oz.  However, for me, those characteristics seemed a bit out of place for someone her age.  While she still showed singing, dancing and acting skills, she seems to be "stuck" with some of the early freshness she had exhibited when paying a younger character.

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

Judy Garland owned the song, the set, the character.  She was a gifted actress and had a unique ability to pull the viewer into the song, character, or set due to her skills and professionalism.  Based on her abilities, she could make the mood of the scene happy or sad or comic.  Personally, she was not a favorite and I was not interested in other movies that she was in and my comments are based on videos I have seen of some of her different songs (like the film clips in this daily dose). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1.       The Wizard of Oz was the first film I watched with Judy Garland. I thought her singing was wonderful and that her crying was so moving.

2.       I view Judy as being so professional because she makes the routines look so easy.  Her body movements are natural and fluent. She’s dancing with two of the best technical dancers in musical history. You can tell she loves music and all it has to offer with singing and dancing. I’m surprised the scene actually shot Judy’s hands on the piano keys; they didn’t do that very often. It’s like placing Judy in Dancing with the Stars…she, too, had a large learning curve!

3.       I was always impressed with her performance in A Star is Born; especially when she sang “The Man That Got Away”.  There was a small orchestra in the scene and I could feel she was really in her element with the music and the lyrics; dramatic, loud and strong. It all looks like it was done in one take. Amazing!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1.What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her?

I am 56 and Judy Garland was before my time.  This said, the first film I saw of hers was Wizard of Oz.  I was enchanted and terrified by the flying monkey scene!!  I loved the film and have been a Musical film nut since. Learning in later years that Shirley Temple was considered for the film (whom I also liked) I really could not possibly consider her in that role.  Judy Garland was so relatable to her other co-stars and to me as a kid when she was on this great adventure and just wanting to go home.

2.How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

Now taking this course, I can see her even more how relatable she is.  She seems so at ease with her other co-stars and believable.  Knowing now how difficult her personal life was, it makes you wonder how she could pull of these incredible performances.

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

I have seen a number of her films over the years prior to this course due to my love for musicals (and the music of which I own many soundtracks... as a side note, when the world news gets too difficult, my great retreat is listening to musicals).  I think her ability to transform from a child actor to adult was amazing since that was not an easy transition for many.  I loved Easter Parade and My Pal Joey, along with Meet me in St. Louis.  She did have that ability to feel very connnected to the audience.  Perhaps it was just her style or something that stemmed from her own struggles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her

"Easter Parade" - I was amazed at her humor both in songs like "A Couple of Swells" and in the banter she did with Astaire.

  • How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

I must confess that these clips didn't enlighten me about her.  I was already a fan.  Her heartbreaking gifts for drama, her charm as a comic actor, and her versatility in all things musical convinced me long ago about how great she is.

  • What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

"A Star Is Born" cemented her, in my mind at least, as one of the most under appreciated dramatic actors of all time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. The first movie, with Judy Garland was Wizard of Oz. She was a good singer and a young needy girl. 

2. She was very talented singer, actress and dancer, or performer. She seems to be struggling with life in her older films. She was not the young naive, sweet singer with no problems.  Previously in her earlier movies, she had been glamorous and perfect, not with a bit of comedy. 

3. Meet me in St Louis shows her ability to story tell in the Trolley and the song Have yourself a Merry Little Christmas.  The second song became a great big hit. I see growth in her story telling ability in A Star is Born as it is a very close story to her life.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. The first Judy Garland movie I can remember watching is The Wizard of Oz, which probably comes as no surprise. From that first viewing (what I can accurately remember of it) and subsequent viewings afterwards, I was enamored with Judy Garland's portrayal of Dorothy and loved (still do) the skillful way she weaves spunk, naivete, kindness, and ingenuity into the character. Not to mention the singing and dancing; I still can't look away when she performs Somewhere over the Rainbow.

2. After viewing those two clips, the only part of my viewpoint that's changed is I now admire her more not only for her incredible dancing and singing skills, but also for her versatility in those arenas. I was particularly taken by the clip of her performance in Easter Parade, the way she skillfully dances around the stage in fluid movements while still infusing the act with a goofy playfulness is extraordinary. 

3. One film of hers that immediately comes to mind as an example of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric (aside from the Wizard of Oz) is her version of A Star is Born. Nearly very performance of hers in that film has the ability to engage the audience's attention and follow the emotions underlying the story; one that I love for this very reason is her performance of The Man That Got Away.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. As most are probably going to say my first film I remember seeing her in was The Wizard of Oz. My first impression of here was that she had an amazing voice. I loved trying to copy her singing Somewhere over the Rainbow. She was also very beautiful, and I just love her as Dorothy in the film. It’s a film that I can watch over and over and that’s mostly because of Judy. Which is why she is one of my favorite actresses of all time. 

2. I still think she is one of the best to come out of Hollywood. A talented actress, singer and dancer there really is no one like her that I can think of. She always gives a real performance and adapts to the characters she’s playing. Seeing some of these clips only further establishes that.

3. Meet Me in St. Louis I still love her rendition of Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas. Which is one of my favorite Christmas songs to date. She pours so much into it that it makes me love the song. Her voice is incredible. I also do love her in The Pirate from 1948 when she sings Mack the Black and Be a Clown both engage the viewer even further into the story when she sings any note.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. The first films of Judy Garland that I remember seeing were The Wizard of Oz and the musicals she did with Mickey Rooney i.e Babes on Broadway and Girl Crazy. In these films Judy is shown as the sweet kind girl next door that everyone loves yet is overlooked by the male protagonist in favor of a more flashy female.

2. You can definitely see Judy's progression from girl next door to beautiful woman in these two clips. She is definitely not being overlooked by either Astaire or Kelly.

3. Two of my favorite later Garland works are Harvey Girls and of course the absolutely splended A Star is Born. The song " There writing songs of love but not for me" in Harvey girls is one of my favorites and as I am sure it has been mentioned many times but "The Man that got away" from A Star is Born gives me chills to this day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The wizard of oz because it was often on television when I was a child.  I think I was impressed that although she was still really a child  that she had a maturity to play the roll and be its lead.  Although she was much younger than the actors in the adult rolls, she was in many ways the leader in the group.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1.    What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her?

The first time I recall watching Judy was on a TV special. It must have been around 1960, give or take a few years. I was just hitting my early teens and here was this woman with a magnificent voice dressed not just in the gowns the other women wore but in a black jacket, top hat and black tap pants and hose. I thought she was the most wonderful woman on two dancing feet! Her voice soared, her body moved to the music like a violin string plucked by the musician, and her face moved to the lyrics so the viewer experienced each nuance of the song. I was lucky; my mother used to sing and she wuld sit and explain why someone was good or not. She thought Judy was the best. I know I must have seen movies of her before that special but that is the image that coems to mind. The movies I have seen so many times over the years they all blend together. That special was just that, on TV once and very special.

2.    How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

I don’t really view her differently since I am very familiar with this scene. What did strike me when watching it was the difference in handling between this song and the one in Yankee Doddle Dandy “Forthy Five Minutes from Broadway”. They both deal with the haves and have nots between the posh and not posh parts of NYC. Yankeee Doodle kept it refined when sung because of the singer. In Easter Parade with Judy’s range and comic ability what might have been sung straight became a wonderful comic song.

3.    What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?
 
One film is “A Star is Born”. When I was younger I didn’t like this is film very much. It waas the music and the feeling that Judy put into music that helped me to understand the story that I was too young to understand. But as I got older and had more experience, I understood the story on its own rights. It was then that the songs sung by Judy took on even more meaning. Her voice could paint such pictures in your mind. With one adjustment to another you felt sad, happy, worried,etc. I don’t remember the names of the songs in that movie. I just remember her magic

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really didn't have much knowledge about Judy Garland's career beyond The Wizard of Oz, which was the only film I've seen of her. But I really loved how Dr. Ament put her career in perspective in terms of her impact to musicals and Hollywood as a whole. It really piqued my interest and I have plans to watch several more of her films (hopefully, Meet Me in St. Louis tonight)

As for the two scenes, it's really evident what Dr. Ament says about how despite her talents, Garland never tried to upstage her partners. And considering she is partnered here with Astaire and Kelly, both of which are also icons of musicals and dance, it's so good to see the fluidity with which they both work. Both dance routines are so smooth, none of them ever misses a beat. Loved them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her?

The first Judy Garland film I recall watching was Wizard of Oz. I thought she was amazing in that movie. They keep making new versions of the Wizard of Oz. However, none compare to the original one. Her voice gave the character innocence. Her voice wasn't shown to its true power in this film as I later discovered how amazing her voice really was and how unique it was. Compared to other people her voice gave her personality and uniqueness. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. The first film I saw with Judy Garland was Wizard of Oz, and my first impression of her was that she is a good singer.

2. I still see her as a really good singer

3. A star is born and I could go on singing are two films of her that come to mind when I think of her later career and her ability to capture audience imagination.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1.) Of course it was the Wizard of Oz. I could not believe as a youngster that someone as young or a little bit older than I could be such a consummate actor/singer. Judy at sixteen or seventeen had it all together, voice, acting ability and the incredible hoofing. 

2.) When you view these Judy films chronologically, Wizard of Oz, For Me and My Gal and Easter Parade, you really do see a legend unfolding before our eyes. In each of these films she takes her talents to even newer heights. 

3.) Sweet Jesus . . .  undoubtedly, The man that got away, From a Star is Born. If that isn’t selling a song and telling a story I don’t know what is. Investing in the lyrics thats what that is! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. Wizard of Oz like most people would say. It's an American classic that was shown on television at least once year.

2. I don't view her differently I just see her talent and skill growing with each film.

3. Meet Me in St Louis. Although that might be because it's on of my all time favorite movies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1) Much like many others on the forum, my first Garland film was Wizard of Oz. I was mesmerized by her voice and her display of youthful maturity. Although some of her other films are more dear to me now that I am older, the magic of The Wizard of Oz will never leave.

2) Easter Parade has been one of my favorite Garland and Astaire films since first seeing it when I was a teenager. When I saw this film, I was able to put her into a comedic light rather than just being a "pretty singer" like much of her other roles had portrayed her to be.

3) Some of the other films around this time seem to capture the beauty and the storytelling aspect of her singing, such as Meet Me in St. Louis, The Harvey Girls, and In the Good Old Summertime (a personal favorite). Although her personal life plagued her towards the end of the 1940's, she still was able to push through the struggle on-screen and bring her stories to life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her?

  • I want to say "The Wizard of Oz," but it more likely was "Easter Parade" (I must have my annual "Easter Parade" fix to maintain peace and order in my universe) or one of the Judy-Mickey "let's put on a show" musicals (these can be problematic (blackface anyone?), but I love them just the same, and I am one of those people who actually respects and admires the many talents of Mickey Rooney as well). So, what was my impression? That she was one of the Great Wonders of the World -- as were many of her co-stars (separate Wonders, that is). I happen to be of an age where I heard the tragic news live on TV/radio almost 50 years ago this month (June 22, 1969) that she had left us. Needless to say, my parents had a "lot of splainin to do" before I settled down. I had always watched every year to make sure Dorothy got home safe and sound to Auntie 'Em and the gang back in Kansas. I was devastated to learn otherwise (at least in real life). But we are so blessed that she and all of our other classic movie "friends" are still with us on film/DVD/TCM. Where would we be without them? ?

How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

  • Frankly, just the same. LUV! LUV! LUV! I already confessed to my "Easter Parade" habit. I am also a "For Me and My Gal" fan from way back. And because I am a fair and just person, I always roll each of the song and dance numbers at least twice (especially my childhood favorite "Swells). One time for Fred/Gene. One time (maybe more) for Judy. After all, fair is fair. ?

What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

  • Duh! "A Star if Born." I like "I Could Go On Singing" as well. Neither is a favorite of mine, but there is no denying how successful she had become in using her inner demons to sell a song. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like many others, the first Judy Garland film I saw was The Wizard of Oz. I thought she was beautiful and lovely and my impression has not changed. After seeing these clips, I realize that she was also a fantastic dancer and a great actress. Obviously we all knew she could sing, but she was a great all around performer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1)  What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her?  Up until now I believe I have only ever seen The Wizard of Oz.  I always liked Judy Garland as an actress and a singer.  I look forward to watching some of her other movies so I can get a better idea of how she is in other scenes.

2)  How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?  I see her the same currently.  Being in the Wizard of Oz gave me an idea that she had to have spunk, a sense of humor and a fun personality.

3)  What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?  I am not able to answer this question as I have not seen any of her other work yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1.The Wizard of Oz was the first movie I ever saw Judy Garland in. I was only maybe four or five, but when you're a kid you think more about the overall movie rather than the individual actors. As I grew older and began to watch movies on my own the other memorable movie that I recall seeing Garland in was Easter Parade because there was that scene towards the beginning where she is making faces as she walks down the street. It was such a funny scene and that scene alone made the film so much more impressionable. Then she sang a rendition of "Merry Little Christmas" in "Meet Me in St. Louis," which I found to be beautiful and absolutely haunting. 

2.I'm not sure if I view her any different after seeing these clips because I always had an appreciation for Garland. I've always thought she was a beautiful performer. I get so lost in her performance in any movie she's in. 

3.I really felt Easter Parade showed her dynamic side because she sings, dances, and she's hilarious in that movie. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The first film of Garland that introduced me to an amazing and talented actress was The Wizard of Oz. I adore the story about the Land of Oz ever since I was a kid and it still stays with me even now. And the rendition Garland gave in her performance as Dorothy was so moving and inspirational as a dream is within reach if we believe. Garland was a versatile actress and you can see what kind of drive she had in all her films donning from her child acting days at MGM to her amazing hits before finally reaching that rainbow the sky she kept singing about.

My opinion of Judy hasn't changed before watching these clips and still will never change after watching them. Garland was a talented actress and left this world a little too early. No matter how many documentaries I've seen about her many demons, none of them have alter my devotion to her craft, charisma and legacy she left behind.

All of her films, show off her amazing ability to capture an audience attention and hearts, but if I had to narrow it down, I would have to go with A Star is Born, Til the Clouds Roll By and Meet Me in St Louis. All three in their own way show off her immerse talent, strong will voice, characters that stand their ground, to list a few. When you watch one of Garland's films, you can see not only her talent to bring her characters to life, but also see a shed of her own emotional life seep through as well. Whether the film be a romantic comedy or a dramatic affair, you see Garland as her true self, not a facade.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/12/2018 at 7:57 AM, Masscommmike said:

Like most people, the Wizard of Oz was the first time I saw Judy Garland perform on film.  My first impression was that she was extremely talented singer and performer.

These clips confirmed her talent as a singer and performer.   It also highlighted her range as an actress.

This is not a film but in the Sixties, Judy Garland had a TV show that once again showcased her talents as a singer and performer.  Here is a clip.  You may want to fast forward through the opening graphic.

 

From chills up my arms to tears in my eyes, Judy never disappoints.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1.     What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her?

The first Judy Garland film, for me, was “The Wizard of Oz”. I was in my twenties before the film aired at a day and time I could view it.  From her first note of “Over the rainbow” I was utterly and completely slayed. I could hardly believe the sweet intonations, and clarity of her voice. I knew her voice was a gift to us all! Her voice was one with which I could blend and harmonize which made it so personal. To this day I prefer her performances where she sings with the same sweetness and gentleness. She can surely belt out any song…however, I love the sweeter side!

2.     How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

I always catch myself listening for that sweet quality to Garland’s voice which first captured my attention in “The Wizard of Oz” and I’m happy to say it was there in both of these clips. Her vibrato continues to change as she matures but she maintains beautiful control. As an example, in the clip from “The Easter Parade” she quavers just a little bit of the devilishness she is portraying as she sings the word cad. It made me grin! Additionally, during the dance routines you can see she is as light as a feather. She is a wonderful dancer…bright and I just want to keep watching her so I won’t miss any of her facial expressions! With Astaire it was obvious they had to be careful she didn’t go flying! What a privilege it was for both Garland and Kelly to dance together in “For Me and My Gal”…they are matched perfectly and, for me, it just seemed to be so much fun! There is a lilt to her laugh. In previous films I thought her performances to be much more forced…not so here…she was natural and believable. Neither of these clips truly capture the beauty of her face like was done in “Meet me in St Louis”.

3.     What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

From the Movie: “A Star is Born” with the song “The man that Got Away”…I chose this example because she opens up the relatability of the audience. She evokes understanding and empathy through telling us what has happened, how she feels about it, what is happening now and what the end result is…all through lyrics (and a believable performance).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us