Dr. Vanessa Theme Ament

DAILY DOSE OF DELIGHT #6 (From TWO JUDY GARLAND FILMS)

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The first film that I saw like most other people was The Wizard of Oz. To me it related to the young children all over the world.  Her range of voice in it was something out of this world.

As for the impression after viewing the two clips it is that she can adapt her self to almost any situation and not seem to have any trouble doing it.  She can act as if she is playing the piano or can dance as if it is second nature to her.  She has a wide range of talent and shows it but does not try to steel the scene from the other acts that are there with her.

Right now I am watching the Harvey Girls and there is A Star is Born.I have also seen The Pirate and the Easter Parade.  These are all great films and I don't mind watching them over and over again.

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18 minutes ago, ameliajc said:

I confess that I would have appreciated some class commentary on The Pirate. It's a film I've never cared for much -- too goofy a costume drama, not much drawn to the Gene Kelly character, can't remember a single song from it. As the last film on the list of Judy's films for this week, it doesn't seem like a very impressive culminating point. I will try to sit through the film again for this class, but my thought is always -- Judy, it's time to move on from the MGM musical, you're done now. Can anybody enlighten me here?

I love The Pirate precisely because it's 'goofy.'  I think it's hilarious!  The over the top acting and the screenplay are the reasons I'm drawn to it, whereas the songs, despite being Cole Porter, are only a secondary attraction - and sometimes, dare I say, skippable... 

If anything told Judy it was time to move on from the MGM musical, in my opinion that would have to be Summer Stock.  It's got some lovely moments, but that plot is really outdated for 1950 and it feels like a step backward for both Gene and Judy. 

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1.What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her?

Like most people on this site, the first film I remember seeing Judy Garland was "The Wizard of Oz." I did not know until years later how old she was when she made that movie, I thought she was 14 the entire time. Of course, I was only 4 years old the first time I watched the movie. My mother would sing "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" to me every night and I thought Judy stole the song from my mother...LOL 

2.How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

Since the days of "The Wizard of Oz," I have loved Judy Garland movies for years. I've always found her entertaining. I loved the Andy Hardy movies and enjoyed "The Pirate" very much. It wasn't until watching her in "A Star is Born" that I saw the true depths of her talents. Knowing how she had died when I watched the movie made it even more poignant. I cried watching her sorrow.

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

I guess I've answered this question with the question above, but I would like to add that any movie that she was in, was a great movie and worth watching.

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1) The first Judy Garland film I ever watched was The Wizard of Oz. I remember watching it in third grade and telling my mom about it when I got home from school. I enjoyed it so much that I wanted to buy it and eventually did buy a VHS copy. I watched it so many times as a kid because I thought Judy Garland was so beautiful and talented. The way she sang and made friends with the lion, scarecrow and tinman while being accompanied by Toto was a dream for me. I wanted to visit the land of Oz and be best friends with Dorothy. Judy gave me so much happiness and hope. When my mom would take me to the public library I would spend my time looking at pictures of my first icon and renting the L. Frank Baum book with a 1939 film shot on the cover. One Halloween I even dressed up as Dorothy because she was my favorite character and Judy Garland was my favorite actress.

2) There is still the same impression of Judy Garland that I get from watching the Easter Parade and Me and My Gal. She still has the ability to keep a viewer entertained and in awe when she is on the screen. The difference from a teen star to her roles in 1940s films is that she has matured both as a woman, and an actress and singer. Her ability to play older roles and provide a sense of humor and romance proves she was not just someone who played fantasy roles. Her performance in "A Couple of Swells" is believable. Her ability to dance a choreography and sing at the same time while maintaining character is marvelous. She has such talent to step out of herself to become the character she is playing. The Me and My Gal clip is also very believable. From playing the piano to being coquettish with Gene Kelly's character is a great quality that not many actors today have. She definitely immerged herself in her adult roles. Her acting and performances improved since her early films, which is why she became such an iconic star during the end of the Great Depression and well into WWII. People enjoyed seeing her on screen because she was able to take them away from their troubles.

3) The film that comes to mind of her later career is Meet Me in St. Louis. It is another Judy Garland film that I absolutely enjoy. After watching the lecture video I can agree that this film became a transition from Garland's early work. The way she performs a song and the mise-en-scene of Vincent Minelli capture her maturity as an actress. Her on-screen relationship with Tootie and the boy next door are both forms in which she can get to someone's age or appropriate behavior. The way she behaves with Tootie is as a big sister who is fun and also supportive when things go wrong. When she is with the boy she is in love you can see how her behavior is very authentic, because as an actress she makes herself step into the character's shoes and flirtaciously and timidly be around him.

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1. The first movie I remember seeing Judy Garland in is "The Wizard of Oz".  I remember being so scared of the tornado scene when I was young that I would hide my head under a blanket until it was over.  I also had a special connection to her because we had a Cairn Terrier (like Toto) when I was younger.  I remember thinking how brave Dorothy was, especially when she melts the witch at the end.

2. The two clips, especially the "Easter Parade" one, reminded me how very funny Judy was! I had seen both clips before but had forgotten.

3. My favorite Judy Garland movie is "Meet Me In St Louis."  In that film, she seems to transition from child to adult.  I've always loved the scene where she sings to Tootie, then tries to reassure her that everything will be fine when they move to New York.  (It's clear, though, that Esther is trying to convince herself of the same thing.)

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1. The Wizard of Oz is probably the first Judy Garland movie I saw.  To be honest, it isn't among my favorite movies and I don't really remember what I thought about her.  But I love the supporting characters of the Scarecrow, Tin Man, and especially the Cowardly Lion.  I do vaguely remember being afraid of the flying monkeys as a kid.

2. I have seen quite a few of her movies now.  The clips do bring out the nuances of her performance and how she captures the camera, especially in the scene from Easter Parade.  Fred Astaire almost blends into the background and she was only 26 when she made this movie.  

3.  The movie Summer Stock and her Get Happy number.  It is only 2 years after Easter Parade but she seems so much older in many ways.  Her struggles with a number of issues is well documented, so this number, which is so well-paced, subtle, and adult almost seems like her statement of coming back.  Also, her performance in A Star is Born with the divine James Mason is amazing.  And she was only in her early 30s.  

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1. What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her?

Of course, it has to be The Wizard of Oz for me too. We watched it every year when it started coming on TV. I was young when I first saw it, but I remember identifying with her. Not only did she have a wonderful singing voice, she had a unique speaking voice. Her reactions to the other characters were so genuine. That speech she gave to her friends saying goodbye...should have earned her an academy award. She expressed so much feeling and she had to be one of the top criers of that time along with Margaret O’Brien and Freddie Bartholomew.

2.How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

After seeing The Wizard of Oz, I made it my mission to see all of her movies. You can see how she matured through the years. In a couple of her earlier films her songs were novelties. She was the cute, chubby girl with the amazing voice. I loved Dear Mr. Gable which I think was seen before The Wizard of Oz was released. I loved her in the Andy Hardy films and in all of her wonderful movies with Mickey Rooney. After That MGM started giving her more mature roles...even the non-musical The Clock. She was amazing. Then she did Judgement at Nuremsburg. I could go on and on. As a side remark...did you know that Lady Gaga is playing the lead in a new version of A Star Is Born?

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

Two songs from A Star Is Born come to mind...I Was Born In a Trunk and The Man That Got Away. I always felt that Judy was never completely happy. She seemed to have so much success, but it seemed that her relationship with the character, Norman paralleled her personal relationships. Because she gave me so much joy as a performer, I just wanted a happily ever after for her.

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My first Garland experience was her as a “droop” in Andy Hardy. She was the neighbor who was a little girl to Hardy but she was so infatuated with him, she would and did anything for him. Helping him through every dilemma, hoping for him to notice her but just getting the “friends “ feeling from him. She was definitely the more mature character. 

Even at that young age she showed such poise and spirit. It was so very obvious that she was going to be a star. 

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1. The first Judy Garland movie I saw was "Wizard of Oz". I remember it was the one night a year I got to stay up late just so I could watch it. I thought she was beautiful, young amd so talented.

2. These are two completely opposite clips when looking at her acting ability. I definitely have more appreciation of her and her talent. I can honestly say I have not seen her in many films. She is truly a talented actress.

3. I saw "Easter Parade" years ago! It has been long time. What I can remember is she looked so grown up and almost regal. It was quite a different role from Dorothy.

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The Wizard of Oz was the first movie that exposed me to the talents of Judy Garland.  I was a child and enjoyed her performance even then, a female character with whom I could relate, but I suppose at the time I didn't understand it that way.  It became a tradition in my family to watch the Wizard of Oz every year when it was broadcast on TV, I think around Easter.  My siblings and I were invited to our friends and neighbors house to watch it in color, that dates me doesn't it?  My favorite movie song is Somewhere Over the Rainbow and over the years I grew to appreciate the quality and vulnerablitly of her voice in that performance in one so young and as she continued into adulthood and more mature roles.

My favorite Christmas song is Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas and although many times replicated no one can compare to her delivery of that song.  She conveys both sadness and hopefullness in her magical performance.

Not only is her dramatic range noted in the musicals A Star is Born and Meet Me in St. Louis, but also her later dramatic roles in A Child is Waiting, I Could Go On Singing and Judgement in Nuremberg.  She is often seen as a tragic figure in her private life and I suppose her vulnerability is reflected in her acting.  It was great to see these clips and earlier films that also showcase her skills as a comedian and dancer.  She really is very funny in the clip with Fred Astaire and frankly overshadows him a bit in that one.

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Like so many other who have already posted, my first Judy Garland film was The Wizard of Oz. For a long time, that was the only film I'd seen her in. I think the next time I saw her was a Betsy in the Andy Hardy series. For me, she played a similarly styled role in those films. That's not surprisingly, looking back on it. I could picture LB wanting to keep her in the same type of roles for as long as possible. Honestly, when I reflected on this question of what my impression of her was, I had a hard time coming up with an answer. Perhaps she was forgettable for me in that series. After all, it must have been hard to compete on the screen with such actors as those that played Scarecrow, Tin Man and Lion. 

After only seeing her in little girls or teenager roles, the next time I saw her was in Meet Me In St. Louis, which I found out about through Moguls and Movie Stars. Her role in that intrigued me, and it was because of her performance that I became drawn to what I thought was an otherwise long movie. Each time I watch it I find new things to enjoy and that started with being familiar with Judy. 

I'm looking forward to the films featured today because it gives me a chance to see more of her later work. I was absolutely enchanted by Judy's performance in the clip from Easter Parade. Having never seen the film, all I had was this clip to base my opinions on. I don't know if I was influenced by the curator's note as I watched, but I was immediately drawn to her performance rather than Fred Astaire's. She sparkled and showed the most amazing charisma and personality. There is life and thought put into every movement that she does in this film. 

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I will have to say "The Wizard of Oz", even though I have seen almost every movie Judy Garland ever made - except for "Judgment at Nuremberg" because she didn't do any singing in it.  Guess I just associated her with musicals.  The Wicked Witch scared me to death.  Margaret Hamilton did an awesome job in that part.  I know that they considered Shirley Temple for the role of Dorothy, but that would never have worked.  Her acting and singing were wonderful.  I heard a story that since she was working with three seasoned male veterans, that when they would sing "We're Off to See the Wizard" they would all cram together and leave Judy singing and dancing behind them.  

Judy was amazing with all of her co-stars.  There was no upstaging in any way.  She was a consummate performer. I think she worked with Gene Kelly at least three times: "For Me and My Gal", "The Pirate", and "Summer Stock".  I know they were always on her about her weight, so at the beginning of "Summer Stock" she was a pretty stocky girl, and by the time she sings "Come on Get Happy" she is the size of a twig.  Ms. Garland always looked like she was having the time of her life no matter what role she played.  She was always smiling and looking like she wouldn't want to be anywhere else but on that set.  

The two movies I think of that she did in later years were "A Star is Born" and "A Child is Waiting".  She just had two little sections of singing in the second movie (with Burt Lancaster) and was with James Mason in the first.  Again, her whole heart and soul were in those movies.  As she got older, the medicines she was on started taking more and more of a toll, but the end results are outstanding.  I know she did lose a role to Betty Hutton in "Annie Get Your Gun" because they felt she was unreliable, but I have seen some of the outtakes, and she was great.  She is one of my favorites.  

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1. Although The Wizard of Oz was one of the first Garland movies I saw, the earliest one I recall seeing was actually one of her last: Gay Purr-ee, an animated film in which she voices the character of Mewsette. Therefore, the only thing I really knew of her for was her voice, and it was a great voice. Wizard of Oz, meanwhile, showed me that she was pretty good at dancing as well.

2. She’s definitely very versatile. The Easter Parade clip shows that she could adapt to a more comedic style while the For Me and My Gal clip shows that she could convince you that she really could play the piano even though, from what it sounds like, she couldn’t. She was definitely a very talented actress in addition to her singing.

3. Gay Purr-ee, which was released in 1962, relies heavily on Garland’s voice, specifically during the slower scenes like when they’re showing the streets of Paris, which have beautiful visuals, though nothing of interest going on storywise. The combination between the art style and Garland’s voice is delightful and makes you completely forget that the scene really isn’t anything more than filler. Also, it’s impressive that her voice still remained so great at this point despite her struggles with drug and alcohol addiction.

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1.What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her?

I think for a lot of people my age it was THE WIZARD OF OZ.  I was in 1st grade and remember seeing it on a black and white TV (and if I'm not mistaken, Danny Kaye was the host).  Didn't really think much of her at the time as the wicked witch was terrifying.  When we got a color TV, boy did that change my view of the film forever.  When the film goes into glorious color I felt like a child again.  Judy Garland looked so beautiful in her dress and her voice always impressed me.

2.How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

Judy could do anything, sing anything and even dance to anything.  As mentioned in the curator's notes, she did not "hog" the scenes and her co-stars were up there with her.  She probably believe that their performances would enhance hers.

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

I've never seen her later career musical films and am looking forward to watching A STAR IS BORN.  I was moved by her tour de force performance as "Irene Hoffmann-Wallner" in JUDGEMENT AT NUREMBERG.  Whether singing or acting, Judy Garland is a legendary performer and we are fortunate enough to have her on film.

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1. The first Judy Garland film I recall watching is the Wizard of Oz.  I thought she was the best actress in the entire movie.

2. I now see Judy Garland as a serious performer and not just someone who could sing and dance.

3. One film that comes to mind is A Star is Born.  This was probably one of Judy Garland's most serious film roles next to her performance in Judgment at Nuremberg.  A Star is Born gave Garland the chance to prove that she could take on more dramatic and grown up film roles instead of just playing the young woman trying to become a celebrity or the young woman finding love for the first time.

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1. I know I saw "Wizard of Oz " earlier, but my first actual realization of the power of Judy Garland as a performer would have to be the 1963 duet with the then newcomer Barbra Streisand. Their melding of "Get Happy" and "Happy Days are Here Again" on the Judy Garland Show was burned in my memory.  When videotape and You Tube made it available again, I was just as mesmerized viewing it many years later. 

2. As for the two clips from "Easter Parade" and "For Me and My Gal", Judy puts every part of her body into a song - her arms, torso, shoulders, legs, face and yes, even eyebrows. In both clips she is that character telling her feelings through the song. In "Couple of Swells" poor Fred pales in comparison.  Gene Kelly in the second clip, matches her for facial animation and is just as focused on her as she is on him. (Interesting that Gene Kely was to be her co-star in "Easter Parade", except for a broken foot.  Makes you wonder how the movie might have been different.)

3. "I was born in a trunk in the Princess Theater . . ." is the ultimate story telling!

 

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1. What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her?

The fist time I saw Judy Garland was in Broadway Melody of 1938.  She was only 14 and she sang "You Made Me Love You" while looking at a portrait of Clark Gable.  This clip still melts me stops my heart and takes my breath away.  At the time, Her performance was said to be as incredible and iconic as "Some Where Over The Rainbow".  Those who have not seen Judy prior to the Wizard of OZ should really watch the clip which is available on YouTube and only takes a few minutes.  Also the time when she is not singing but just talking to the picture are completely believable.

2.How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

I have always been amazed by Judy's extraordinary career.  Like some of the older people taking this course I got to watch her movies when many of them came out and followed her all through the years.  We study her here in Musicals but she was a hit at Carnegie Hall,  at concerts of all kinds, onstage, in Las Vegas and on Television.  Its always been a case of great talent and boundless energy.  In all of these different venues her performances rank among the most popular of all time.  Her performances as a young girl will always have a special place for me because I could not believe she could do what she did and how such a pure sweet sound could come from a human being.

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

I think Easter Parade, and a Star Is Born show Judy maturing as a performer in an musical. And for any who question her acting ability I offer "Judgement at Nuremberg" (case closed).

 

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What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her?

Like many, the first film I saw was The Wizard of Oz. However, it was shortly followed by Meet Me In St Louis, which remains a favorite of mine. It was always shown at my great grandparents house at Christmas. 

How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

I have seen almost all Judy Garland films, so I did not necessarily view anything differently. It was just a great reminder of her talent and diversity as a performer! 

What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

Definitely her performances in Summer Stock and even The Pirate. Her musical performances there have such great tones of sexiness and confidence. She is one of the few stars I can think of that we really observe continuing to perform from a child and still maintain her popularity and good reputation (unlike stars today). A notable mention also is The Judy Garland Show, where we again see the diversity of her as a performer as well as seeing more of her own personality rather than an assigned role. Towards the end of her career her films became more dramatic, showcasing her maturity and growth as an actress. 

 

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I a big fan of Judy Garland. Of course the first movie of her's I saw was the Wizard of Oz. I think my first impression was that she was a typical child star. I didn't yet notice her singing talent and stage presence, although it was definitively there and I can't imagine the movie with a different actor in that role. I viewed her differently many years later when I became interested in her entire career and heard her singing performance in her adult years. Her voice and stage presence are incredible, and it shows in these two clips. She is able to draw from her emotions and she had a lot to draw from with her life experiences. For question number three, instead of a movie I would go with her 1955 performance of Over the Rainbow she performed on her variety show where she was in the tramp costume. Her ability to put such emotion into a song she sang her whole life was amazing. 

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Judy, Judy, Judy!

I would think everyone's first exposure to Judy was "The Wizard of Oz."

Never a scene stealer because she never had to!

Interesting to me that Professor Ament pointed out "Me and Mt Gal" was Kelly's first film. If you read about him, he was supposedly very competitive but I find him and Judy Garland are a nice pairing in the 3 films they made together.

Watching Judy in one of her later films, "A Star is Born", what a progression you see of what appears to be her never ending talent and commitment to a song. Just raw transparent talent! They'll never be another like her.

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My first film of Judy Garland was the wizard of Oz. I was amazed by her voice while singing Somewhere over the Rainbow. It just drew me into the movie.

Watching these clips shows her talent as a performer and dancer. She compliments Fred Astaire in A Couple of Swells and she in sync with Gene Kelly in Me ad my Gal.

A Star is Born seems like it was made for her. The way she sings The man who got away makes feel her pain. A very good film. 

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My first Judy Garland film was The Wizard of Oz. Her version of Over the rainbow was mesmerizing and you could see and feel her emotion in this song.

These clips show her versatility. A comedic number with Fred Astaire and her eyes just sparkle with mischief and fun. The clip with Gene Kelly shows her fantastic ability to place feeling in a song. Both clips show her ability to dance with anyone and look as if they have been paired forever.

A Star is Born shows her growth as an actress and her ability to sing every song with true feeling. She was magnificent in this film.

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1.  What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her?

     Like most people, the first Judy Garland film I ever saw was THE WIZARD OF OZ, which was actually the first movie I ever saw (certainly that I can remember). Naturally, my first impression of her was someone who I liked from the very first. I certainly identified with her wanting to be somewhere other than the arid, colorless, dry location of Kansas and going somewhere new and exciting. I could also identify with her fears and her desire to ultimately go home. The realizations she makes by the end of the film (realizing “there’s no place like home”), along with those fears and her longing to be elsewhere are, I think, the primary reasons why generation after generation identify with this film as well as Judy’s overall performance of Dorothy. The financial success of this great film as well as it’s enduring appeal is ultimately due to her brilliant gift as an entertainer.

2.  How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

     I’ve been watching Miss Garland for years, as a matter of fact, there’s not a time in my memory where I didn’t know who she was or what an amazingly brilliant entertainer she was. These clips have only added to my appreciation of her talent and her generous spirit with her co-stars. My family and I have seen quite a few of her films and the complete season of her brilliant and tragically short-lived variety show from 1963-64 and I think mainly due to the fact that we lost her at such an incredibly young age of only 47 is why we enjoy her as much as we do and almost can’t get enough of her. I remember running across John Fricke’s collector’s book JUDY GARLAND: WORLD’S GREATEST ENTERTAINER years ago in my local library and I couldn’t come up with a more perfect superlative for her than that one. 

 3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

    In terms of her career as a singer, I can’t think of any other more perfect examples than her scene in 1954’s A STAR IS BORN when she sings “The Man That Got Away,” which I identify as her signature tune equal to “Over the Rainbow”. The second example is when she gave the most incredible rendition I’ve ever heard of “Old Man River” on an episode from her variety show (the pilot episode with Mickey Rooney as her guest star). I’ve never heard a more perfect rendering of this great song (from SHOWBOAT) than here. Her voice is so perfect and powerful that it gave me the chillls, as I get them anytime I hear a great music performance and Judy Garland is certainly the greatest entertainer I’ve ever seen/heard. It’s truly a shame that she couldn’t have lived at least four more decades and enjoyed more success than she did.

 

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What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her?
I guess like many, the first film I remember seeing of Judy Garland's was The Wizard of Oz. But unlike most, I didn't like the film. (Don't hate me. 😁) As a child, it was scary and even as an adult, I still just don't like it. It doesn't appeal to me. I still thought she was a good actress and that voice is one that will never be matched. She was a triple threat. She could sing, dance, and act and all at the same time making it look easy. She always put so much feeling into the music, too.

How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?
I watch movies for pure entertainment. It isn't until I take a class like this, or Film Appreciation that I took in college where we really concentrated on Hitchcock, that I analyze the films more. (That Film Appreciation class was the second hardest class I ever took, btw. The hardest was trigonometry. 😜) You do start to appreciate the pure talent of Garland when you can analyze everything going on in a scene and see how much she does and makes it all seem effortless.

What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?
Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas just tears me apart in Meet Me in St. Louis. I cry every single time. It's one of my favorite Christmas songs. The way she conveys the melancholy for the future of her family and that they may be split up, really comes through, even as she tries to comfort Tootie and make her feel better. I think her maturity comes through more in her young adult years and that is the time of my favorite Judy Garland films...Meet Me in St. Louis, which I've lost count of the times I have seen, Easter Parade, and Summer Stock.

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4 minutes ago, peejbuddy79 said:

1.  What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her?

     Like most people, the first Judy Garland film I ever saw was THE WIZARD OF OZ, which was actually the first movie I ever saw (certainly that I can remember). Naturally, my first impression of her was someone who I liked from the very first. I certainly identified with her wanting to be somewhere other than the arid, colorless, dry location of Kansas and going somewhere new and exciting. I could also identify with her fears and her desire to ultimately go home. The realizations she makes by the end of the film (realizing “there’s no place like home”), along with those fears and her longing to be elsewhere are, I think, the primary reasons why generation after generation identify with this film as well as Judy’s overall performance of Dorothy. The financial success of this great film as well as it’s enduring appeal is ultimately due to her brilliant gift as an entertainer.

2.  How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

     I’ve been watching Miss Garland for years, as a matter of fact, there’s not a time in my memory where I didn’t know who she was or what an amazingly brilliant entertainer she was. These clips have only added to my appreciation of her talent and her generous spirit with her co-stars. My family and I have seen quite a few of her films and the complete season of her brilliant and tragically short-lived variety show from 1963-64 and I think mainly due to the fact that we lost her at such an incredibly young age of only 47 is why we enjoy her as much as we do and almost can’t get enough of her. I remember running across John Fricke’s collector’s book JUDY GARLAND: WORLD’S GREATEST ENTERTAINER years ago in my local library and I couldn’t come up with a more perfect superlative for her than that one. 

 3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

    In terms of her career as a singer, I can’t think of any other more perfect examples than her scene in 1954’s A STAR IS BORN when she sings “The Man That Got Away,” which I identify as her signature tune equal to “Over the Rainbow”. The second example is when she gave the most incredible rendition I’ve ever heard of “Old Man River” on an episode from her variety show (the pilot episode with Mickey Rooney as her guest star). I’ve never heard a more perfect rendering of this great song (from SHOWBOAT) than here. Her voice is so perfect and powerful that it gave me the chillls, as I get them anytime I hear a great music performance and Judy Garland is certainly the greatest entertainer I’ve ever seen/heard. It’s truly a shame that she couldn’t have lived at least four more decades and enjoyed more success than she did.

 

 

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