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DAILY DOSE OF DELIGHT #6 (From TWO JUDY GARLAND FILMS)

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4 hours ago, thinman2001 said:

1. What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her?

At the age of five my mother took me to see the re-release of Wizard of Oz at the Loew's Pitkin in Brooklyn. The two things I remember most were diving with fright under the seat when the Wicked Witch first appeared in Munchkinland. My other lasting memory was how spunky and take charge Dorothy behaved, while still showing unbounded empathy for the rest of the characters, notwithstanding her plight of being whisked far from home and not knowing if she would ever return. Garland commanded the screen even at the relatively tender age of 16.

2. How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

Having watched her films for over 60 years, viewing these clips did not really have any impact on my impression of her as a performer. However, they do serve to remind you how versatile and talented she was. Few performers could handle singing, dancing, comedic and romantic/dramatic parts as well as she could. From Wizard of Oz to The Pirate to Judgment at Nuremberg, we see the full spectrum of her boundless abilities displayed on the silver screen.

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

The standout performance in her later years was without question A Star is Born. Backed by superb songs from Harold Arlen and Ira Gershwin, George Gershwin and Rodgers and Hart, among others, Garland was able to once again capture the attention of the audience with her renditions of tunes like The Man Who Got Away and Swanee. But most poignantly -- most relevant to this question -- she actually plays the part of a storyteller in the Born in a Trunk number. The only other performer who could both sing and tell a story as well as Garland was Frank Sinatra. Not bad company to be in, IMHO!

I too saw the re-release of the Wizard of Oz but at the Premiere on Sutter Avenue in East New York!

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The first movie I saw with Judy Garland was The Wizard of Oz. I was only a child, but I thought her voice was great. I wanted to become a child star and perform like her.

After listening to and reading the material for this course, I recognize her breadth of talent. I find it especially fascinating that she was not a trained dancer. She certainly kept up with her partners. It is true, she steals the show.

i really like Meet Me in St Louis. It has been one of my favorites since I first saw it as a teen.

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1) The first Judy Garland film I saw was probably the same as most people. It was The Wizard of Oz. The second was For Me and My Gal. I have since seen her in so many of her other works that I have lost count and I have also found bits from her TV show on the internet and watched them as well. I remember as a child, it was her voice that stood out to me. Of course, as a child, I didn't see her as Judy Garland; I saw her as Dorothy.  Dorothy could sing, she was beautiful,and she was brave.

2) I wouldn't say that I see her differently. I would say that my appreciation for her continues to grow in the assortment of things that I have seen her in. She worked hard in the areas where she wasn't as strong (I have read that in her opinion, it was her dancing), so that the final product was worthy.

3) I love her in Summer Stock (which, I know, is from the early 50's). I loved her grit and determination as a farmer, but also the love that she develops for the theater, because it shows that you can be passionate about multiple things and you can invest yourself into those things. I also truly admire her performance in A Star is Born. They keep making remakes of it, but you only need to see Judy in the film and that is enough. The smooth calm when she sings "The Man That Got Away" is one of my favorite moments. She brought such raw emotion to the role that you really felt for her. The scene at the end of the film really shows the mixture of the struggle and the true appreciation that she feels. In my opinion, it was the best of Judy. While I love Grace Kelly as an actress, I truly believe the Oscar should have gone to Judy that year.

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  1. My first Judy Garland film was Wizard of Oz. The only impression I remember having of her was that I loved her shoes and her hair. My grandmother went out and bought me my own ruby slippers and I would wear them to special occasions as well as click them three times just like Judy. As I’ve gotten older, I’ve come to idolise her. She’s a huge part of my life.
  2. Through the material in this section, I was able to pay more attention to her maturation. There are many levels to her performances, and she is completely versatile- she can go from comedic lead to the romantic lead and make the transition look flawless. 
  3. A Star is Born is an intense experience. The audience experiences hope, love, comedy, jealousy, loss, and acceptance all in the span of one film and all mostly through Judy Garland. This rollercoaster of emotions is difficult to achieve and I have only experienced all those things in a handful of performances. You feel everything she says and she feels like someone you know intimately. 

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The first movie in which I saw Wizard of Oz (I was 8). I was touched by her incredible talent for singing and selling the story. It still makes me cry. 

In Easter Parade, she is in full maturity and holds her own with Fred Astaire. Her comic timing is impeccable!. Not many stars would play a dirty tramp with teeth missing,  especially after her beautiful look in "St. Louis", but Judy goes out there and brings it home. Best of all you can feel how much she is enjoying what she does. I  know it was brutally hard work for such perfection, and she was often ill, but she clearly lived to perform.

Lastly, she demonstrated her acting ability in all her films but the one that impressed me the most was Judgement at Nuremberg. 

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What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her?

  • At 5, I saw the Wizard of Oz and fell in love with that Voice as well as her portrayal of courage. As my mother was a huge fan, I got to see other movies as they were shown on TV including all the Mickey Rooney films. The idea of "let's put on our own show" stayed with me

How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

  • It was interesting to see the juxtaposition of these two clips in terms of the chemistry with Astaire vs Kelly. In Easter Parade, which was supposed to star Kelly, her voice and her acting chops to me outshines even Astaire's formidable dancing ability. After watching her with Kelly in one of my favorite movies, the chemistry between the two as well as the lovely blending of voices makes me wish I could have see her perform just that one scene with Kelly. Her acting ability comes out in both clips

What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

  • As other's have said, the only singer who has equal ability to "act" a song was Sinatra. Just recently, I had the occasion to re-watch Judgement at Nuremberg, a non-singing role that earned her an academy award. A Star if Born was of course her musical tour d'force … still bringing me to tears after the umpteenth watching.

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  1. What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her?  I guess like many people it will be The Wizard Oz. I have always been impressed with her voice.  At such a young lady it was like listening to a full adult's voice.
  2. How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously? Her voice is the same she can belt out a song like Julie Andrews where you can still hear hers over everyone else.
  3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?  Where does one start?  A Song is born, Summer Stock and the cartoon Gay Purree in which she could let a song out and everyone knew it was her.  Every time she sang the story was compounded into a more complex plot even though you could figure out how it ends it still was enjoyable to watch.

 

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First movie I ever saw her in, like almost 90% of the rest of the population was Wizard of Oz. I must have been 5yrs old maybe. Terrified me!! But I loved Dorothy! As I got older and saw the film again and again (Who hasn’t) I saw the innocence that she brought to the roll but there was an underlying determination that would not be stopped until she got back to Kanas. This effect she had has never left me.

I am a big fan of Gene Kelly, so watching her in Clip #2; I was smiling the whole time. I honestly thing she stole the scene with Astair, no easy feat! She was a delight to see do comedy that was only lightly touched on in other rolls.

In saw her in The Pirate with Gene Kelly and loved her in it. But I will confers I have not really seen her in to much.

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2 hours ago, A Ryan Seacrest Type said:

... Wonderful stuff, and one of my favorite Best Original Song Oscar winners contained within it as Judy Garland puts everything she has into "On the Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe".  She sang, danced, moved and acted/emoted her way through that like a master, and that's the moment where I realized just how uniquely talented Judy Garland was.  Today's clips only further prove that too.

I just watched Harvey Girls again today on TCM (On summer vacation!) and that number is so wonderfully done with all the townspeople having their bit to say. It's so energetic and captures the energy and excitement of the westward movement in the 19th century.  I love the "chug chug" dance move Judy does with a crowd of girls as they move next to the slowly starting train.  As a train fan, I am likely to break out in this song when I see a train go by!

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I think I probably saw Wizard of Oz as a child in the 1950's. I'm thinking in the theater, because we didn't have a color TV then. Have seen many Judy films. I've appreciated her more as I've aged--lovely, strong voice, pretty good dancer, fine actress (see Judgment at Nuremberg and A Child is Waiting.) A later movie of hers I love is the flawed but fascinating "A Star is Born." I've always felt sorry for Judy, about what she had to go through personally and professionally. But she was always funny with no self-pity.

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1)  My first Judy Garland film was The Wizard of Oz.  I saw her as a teenage girl who could sure dance down that yellow brick road and was able to relate to munchkins not to mention the wizard himself. 

2)  After watching the clips and learning that she didn't play the piano, didn't read music, and was not a trained dancer - WOW - she was just born a natural as an actress, singer, and dancer.  There is no one like her  Her daughter, Liza comes close.  But Judy will always stand alone as the greatest talent in those three areas.  Too bad the industry killed her off.  She did die way too soon. 

3)  I think the most magnificent film of her later years where she conveyed a story through song is in the film A Star is Born.  Wonderful storytelling of a tragic relationship.

Here's to Judy - The best that was ever created in the industry!

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What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her?

The first Judy film I remember watching was most definitely Wizard of Oz. She was able to capture my imagination and my undivided attention with the way she sang and spoke and interacted with those around her. I related to her, and wanted to be like her. I especially wanted to sing like her! Viewing this movie, and all of Judy's performances on-screen, makes me very much appreciate her natural ability to entertain us. Everything she did seemed effortless, and she had a knack for genuinely tugging at your heartstrings and allowing you the escape necessary to feel what she was feeling, and to embark with her on the journey she was taking as any character she portrayed.

How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

Judy's career is one that I have followed for a long while. These clips are wonderful choices to depict how versatile she was, and how believable she could be, in anything and everything. In Me and My Gal we see her in more of a typical, cutesy, romantic courtship situation alongside the equally amazing Gene Kelly. Her mannerisms and the way she delivers lines, and sings, and matches Kelly during the dance routine all speak to her immense talents. In Easter Parade, one of my favourite Judy films, wee see her paired once again with an incredible performer, Fred Astaire. One can argue that Judy steals the show in this number, but she would never have wanted to do that! We can't quite every keep our eyes off of her no matter what she does, and that is as apparent in these clips as it has ever been to me.

What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

Again, Easter Parade is a great example of Judy's evolving career and showcases her mastery of storytelling through song. Particularly, the vaudevillian extravaganza in which we see a montage of old tunes. And, of course, Easter Bonnet/Easter Parade. A few years later, we see Judy in A Star is Born, which shows her at perhaps her most sincere and affecting. It was a sort of comeback vehicle for her, and she reminds us that nobody can quite tell us something through melody like she can.

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impressions

  1. Wizard of Oz- every year most faithfully. Judy was for me the most sweet voiced child/woman actress who could carry the tale in spite of the most extravagant scenes and charming sidekicks. 
  2.  
  3. She’s older but still has that childlike quality of openness. In the scene with Gene, she’s a giggler but can play the piano, sing the song with clarity of voice and dance with one of the greatest, gently holding up her share of the scene. 
  4.  
  5. Meet Me in St Louis is the second film I remember her starring in. She’s a great reflection of a Midwest girl with the openness and a sweetness I loved to watch. Her remake of A Star is Born comes to mind. There’s just a quality to her voice that lends poignancy and certainly more maturity as the actress ages. She left us rich characters that never feel very far from the original, Dorothy.

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My first recollection of Judy Garland was probably in the Wizard of Oz. I don't know if I had any first impressions of her, other than that she fit well in the role of Dorothy. 

I did not think I would view her any differently after those clips, but I was wrong. The clip for "For Me and My Gal", in particular, showed me that she did well on her own but she could also hold her own with a partner. I also noticed that she did not outshine Gene Kelly, and he did not outshine her.

I don't know if it's late enough into her career, but The Pirate comes to mind. One scene, in particular, that I automatically thought, and is one of my favorites, is when she is put under the trance from Kelly's character and she starts singing "Mack the Black" to the crowd. For me, this is one of her more engaging numbers to watch because of the whole idea of her not knowing what she is doing and what she is performing is the complete opposite of her character.

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1.What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her?

My first Judy Garland movie was "The Wizard of Oz." My impression of her was that her character represented a friend whom I wanted to go on an adventure with, travel down the Yellow Brick Road! As an adult watching the film last week, I also felt this, as well as recognizing her star power as an actress, singer, and dancer. "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" is such a special and unique performance.

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1. Wizard of Oz. Great role by a great actress.

2. First time that I am watching her other films. So far so good!

 

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1 - Like so many of my generation, The Wizard of Oz was my introduction to Judy Garland.  I was fascinated by the story and the color, of course, but I distinctly remember being wowed by Garland’s voice.   Upon hearing Somewhere Over the Rainbow I knew, even as a child, that she was something special.

2 - As a Garland fan (while in high school, I was invited to make a presentation about her to an English class), I have seen all of her films.  I followed her from enthusiastic, bright eyed, spirited teen (i.e., Andy Hardy movies) to maturing woman (i.e. Meet Me in St. Louis and Easter Parade), to adult (i.e., A Star is Born).  The fact that MGM allowed her to “grow up”, albeit keeping her younger than her true age as Dorothy, showed what a valuable asset she was to the studio.  It’s a shame they didn’t value the person above the property asset.

3 - Her performance of The Man That Got Away is iconic.  She sold that song, telling a story of lost love and regret. Judy was a master of the use of facial expression while singing and her eyes, especially, drew in the viewer bringing the lyric to life.

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I have been watching Judy Garland since childhood and have seen everything many times.  Believe it or not "The Wizard of Oz" is not the first film I remember seeing her in.  It is "Meet Me in St. Louis" and remains one of my very favorites. Love "The Trolley Song", "The Boy Next Door" and "Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas".  I also love "In The Good Old Summertime"  Great chemestry with Van Johnson.  And she can do great comedy.

One of the first movies I remember which shows she had grown up was "Girl Crazy" with Mickey Rooney.  She was not a juvenile really but was mature and beautiful.  She sang "Embraceable You" and had a romantic connection with Mickey Rooney.  This was not "Dorothy". Wonderful.

Later, singing "The Man That Got Away" in "A Star is Born" - Iconic and unforgetable. And the beginning of a new and diversified career. 

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My first movie was The Wizard of Oz and I was a little girl.  What do I remember about Judy, honestly, the ruby slippers.  I watched the two clips however I have been watching her films forever now. I love Judy. I have noticed for a long time how she draws you completely in. I love her in "In the Good Old Summertime" so many great scenes in that movie demonstrating her 'chops'.  The scene with Van Johnson trying to sell the sheet of music and Judy steps in, makes the sale however it's a great flirting scene between Garland and Van Johnson. The other scene, which is very different is the straight performance of her with the quartet singers at the party, I love that scene too.

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The first Judy Garland film I ever saw was of course The Wizard of Oz which is one of my favorite movies as my mother will attest to.  However it is wonderful to see her in other films as well and to watch her mature into a very talented woman from a very talented young girl.  I have seen Meet me in St. Louis twice before but looking forward to seeing it again as well as For me and my Gal as I have loved Gene Kelly since the very first time I saw Singing in the Rain which is the first Gene Kelly film I ever saw

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I have to admit I was never particularly a fan of Judy Garland. Two of my very favorite musicals are Meet Me in St. Louis and Easter Parade, and I always said they were favorites not because of Judy, but despite her. I've gained an entirely new appreciation of her through this course! I must say I am loving this course - I just started this weekend since last week was the last week of school, and I teach 2nd grade. This is the best way to start summer!

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Naturally the first film I remember is "The Wizard of Oz." I know it's shallow of me, and I'm not really sure of my impression that long ago, but I initially thought she was too old and tall for the role. But after she left the Munchkins, I never thought of that again. She was just perfect in all aspects.

You said she wasn't a trained dancer, but boy, could she keep with with Astaire and Kelly. You also talk about her being a generous performer to her co-stars -- I was impressed how generous Astaire was to her: the dance routine fit her talents perfectly and he allowed her to sing so that we hardly even knew he was singing! When he sang with other actresses it seemed like they were matched in volume, but no one could contain that Garland voice!

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15 minutes ago, Terridibart said:

My first movie was The Wizard of Oz and I was a little girl.  What do I remember about Judy, honestly, the ruby slippers.  I watched the two clips however I have been watching her films forever now. I love Judy. I have noticed for a long time how she draws you completely in. I love her in "In the Good Old Summertime" so many great scenes in that movie demonstrating her 'chops'.  The scene with Van Johnson trying to sell the sheet of music and Judy steps in, makes the sale however it's a great flirting scene between Garland and Van Johnson. The other scene, which is very different is the straight performance of her with the quartet singers at the party, I love that scene too.

Oh I forgot all about’ In the Good Ole Summertime ‘. Great movie thanks for mentioning it. I’ll have to watch it again. 

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My first Judy Garland film was Wizard of Oz, on black and white television, so I missed the transition of Oz to color. I was too young to appreciate the songs, or Judy; I didn't even understand that the key characters were back home on the farm - but I was terrified of the witch, and hid behind my older brother's chair whenever she appeared. Handily we had a LP of the Wizard of Oz movie, with songs, so I can recite almost the entire movie now. (If only we had LPs of Shakespeare.) It's hard for me to view her with a fresh eye, since she's always been a part of my musical world - she's been singing at Christmas all my life. I think we all started with Wizard of Oz because it was broadcast on TV - her movies didn't get as much broadcast play (I'm so glad there's TCM now!) but music filled the breach.

I've seen both films from which the clips are pulled before on TCM many times; although I'm not personally a fan of the "Me and My Gal" story, I do like the music. (I find Gene to be a little stagey still, and the story goes too far before redemption.) I do love Easter Parade (doesn't everyone?) - the Berlin songs are perfect, Ann Miller a delight, Jules Munchin so nice to see, and Judy doing comedy in comfort is a gem. I've always been impressed with her ability to process so much to do in a few minutes. I do enjoy the 'swells' number and like the contrast between quiet Fred and boisterous Judy.

I think Judy had key capabilities that other traditional musical stars lacked: she consistently conveyed that she felt every word she sang. You can see this from the beginning of her career (when she sang to "dear mr. gable") through her later years when she was singing "friendly star" in "Summer Stock."   She was also willing to make fun of her acting personae - as she did with the incredibly talented Mickey Rooney in "Girl Crazy." And she could dance like a house afire - "atchison topeka" one-take Judy. Those are things you could say, with less superlatives, about an actress like Mitzi Gaynor (she could sing, dance, looked like a postcard, and cry on cue) - but it's laughable to compare Gaynor to Garland. Judy was far more compelling in every area. Little Frances gave everything she had in every performance. Perhaps that's why, as she herself said, it was much harder to BE Judy Garland as she got older than it was to work with her.

I think my favorite movie is "Meet me in St. Louis," - all round perfection;  favorite look for her is "the Harvey Girls" - her make up is stunning and outfits are beautiful (and I also love how Angela Lansbury looks even tho she so young). I think her "get happy" number from "Summer Stock" is the performance to remember her by. A good example (sorry, this is probably an easy example) of her storytelling ability is "the Trolley Song" in "St Louis" - it's a literal story she draws the trolley audience and the rest of us into with her growing excitement as she sings.

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I got to know Judy Garland first by hearing my mother talk about her--always with respect and admiration. The first Garland films I remember are A Star is Born and Judgment at Nuremberg. I thought she was so deeply sad and it seemed that I wasn't just watching her but feeling along with her. When my father finally allowed us to have a television (he thought they destroyed imagination and wasted time), I saw The Wizard of Oz, Easter Parade, and one of my favorite movies of all time--Meet Me in St. Louis. I was relieved and happy to learn that she was not always sad, and I loved her humor, her dancing, and her uniquely wonderful singing. I watch Meet Me in St. Louis every year. I love Tootie with her childhood anarchy and her deep capacity for anger and pain. Children don't get enough credit for depth of feeling, and Tootie makes this point so brilliantly. In a film with such a beautiful surface, Garland's Esther shows that a pretty girl is more than her looks: she shows deep loyalty and concern for her family in Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas and she reveals the nerves and hope that go with finding someone to love in The Boy Next Door. Her scenes with her grandfather also emphasize the continuity of affection and support in families. Vincente Minelli photographs her so well. She is not a conventional Hollywood beauty but she has a transforming inner beauty that shines out of her extraordinary eyes. I also think it's important to see how she shows personal strength in film after film, starting with The Wizard of Oz. Her ability to stand up to the egotism of Gene Kelly in For Me and My Gal shows up again in The Harvey Girls. She also had an intelligent skepticism that shows up in her show business parodies like the Swells number in Easter Parade and the entire film The Pirate.  She is an  American original, a real gift to the public and the movies. I am sorry that she paid such a high price for her life as an artist.

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