Dr. Vanessa Theme Ament

DAILY DOSE OF DELIGHT #6 (From TWO JUDY GARLAND FILMS)

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1. I think, like many in my generation, the first movie I saw of Garland's was Wizard of Oz. In fact, for most of my childhood/teens I didn't realize there were other movies of her--that was THE movie and she was THE Dorothy. 

2. I've seen both of the movies used in the clip multiple times, but when I first started seeing her catalog of talent, I remember being surprised to see that Dorothy grew up--and grew up insanely talented. Gone is the round-faced little girl with large eyes and a cute dog. Garland is a class act, and she cracks me up.

3. The Pirate was one of the first "later" movies I saw of Garland's, and I was completely enthralled by her Mack the Black song (as well as others). Not long later I saw Meet Me in St. Louis for the first time. I cried all the way through Have yourself a Merry Little Christmas.

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1. The Wizard of Oz must have been the first film in which I saw Judy Garland.  She was fresh, new, and had a great voice, a surprise from such a young performer.

2. In the clips from Me and My Gal, she has become a young woman, still fresh but with a new maturity which allows her to hold her own on screen with Gene Kelly's assertive personality. The chemistry between them is instantly obvious (I understand she asked the studio to cast Kelly in the lead for this film after she saw him in Pal Joey on Broadway. George Murphy got bumped to a smaller role.) Now she is believable as a romantic partner for the male lead.

3. The clip from Easter Parade is a big leap forward in her versatility and range.  She portrays a fully comic, colorful, and aggressive character, which I had never seen her do before. She dances with full confidence and joy alongside the legendary Fred Astaire. There is no hint of intimidation. She is a star.

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Daily Dose #6 Judy Garland

Yes, the "Wizard of Oz" was the first movie I remember her in & the next would be "Meet Me in St Louis"

She was talented in all areas...she could act, sing & dance

Wiki reports that "Easter Parade"  was the highest grossing musical of 1948 for all involved including the main actor/players...I don't know why but maybe the audience identified with the color & style of it all as a whole

Wiki also reported that Gene Kelly was to be the main dancer but broke his ankle playing volleyball & so Fred Astaire, though retired was called in by Kelly...looks like it worked out

Since I mentioned Gene Kelly I would like to say how much I like this guys dancing! He is so light on his feet & graceful, I'm sure many women  would love to have this lightness & grace in their dance as he did

Judy Garland was very cute in Oz & the opening of the movie was wonderful & the dance routine "A Couple of Swells" does show her playful side w/ a bit of sadness...class again...poor & wealthy, a recurring theme in these old musicals for example:  "Gold diggers of 33"

"In Meet Me in St Louis" Garlands (Esther Smith) connection to the little cutie Margaret O'Brien"Tootie" Smith cannot be beat & they have many memorable scenes together...more than any of the others

Garland is so beautiful in that Christmas dress & dance number & when she sings to comfort Tootie framed in the window casing w/ moonlight on the snow...beautiful movie moment & superb directing 

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It has to be The Wizard of Oz as a child. Every year (for a time) they played it on TV and it was a ritual (one my mom got tired of viewing as we only had the one TV). She was so likeable and appealing and you truly felt her emotions throughout the film. You shared the journey with her. And what an incredible voice for a petite, teenaged girl! I think Meet Me in St. Louis was the next one I remember - still love the film and Judy's performance of Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas is memorable and no one has every topped her delivery in my opinion (it's also my favorite holiday song).

The clips didn't change my view of Judy just enriched them. The more films you see with Judy the more you appreciate how extraordinary a performer she was. She really could multi-task so naturally on film that it seemed effortless. It's hard for me to believe how MGM misused, overused and eventually tossed out such a unique and rare artist. If she had been handled differently we could all have enjoyed her on film for so many more years.

I think The Man That Got Away from A Star Is Born is the best example of the more mature Judy's expressive way of delivering a song. Again, you feel all of her emotions in the delivery powered by that magnificent voice and stellar acting skills. Again, I cannot believe this artist couldn't get another film role after that performance. 

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I am so glad we took the time to draw attention to Judy Garland. She is someone i have been wanting to watch more musicals as i find her talent outshines most stars of any musical. You only need to see her once to know you would see her again.

 

 

What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her

Of course The Wizard of Oz but i had also seen parts of Meet Me In St. Louis before i realized who Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz was.

Her voice and presence cannot be duplicated. I have always felt she takes the spotlight of any film shes been in.

How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

I love discovering just how talented she is and look forward to exploring more roles that shes portrayed.  I unfortunately have not seen very many as of  yet. Im going to change that for sure.

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1) What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her?

The first film I saw of Garland's was probably The Wizard of Oz, which most people see, especially when they're young. At first, I didn't have any impression because I was so young when I first saw it. However, seeing it again and again in my teens, twenties, and now in my thirties, I think that she is the only one would can portray Dorothy. No one else comes close to her. She gave that iconic character innocence, but also strength. She is obviously one of the top reasons why the film remains a Cinema classic.

2) How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

Honestly, I don't view her differently because seeing her films, clips and otherwise, have already established that she remains one of the greatest stars in film history. Her talent should never be overestimated nor understated. When I see her in classic film, my appreciation of her grows more and more after each viewing. 

3) What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

I obviously have to look back at A Star is Born, which was her career comeback, and a marvelous one at that. When she sung 'The Man That Got Away', it was like time stood still. She put just the right emotion and heart into it. As with the other songs in the film, she put her soul into them. The film was kind of biographical because of the personal struggles she endured throughout her life. Whenever she was onscreen, you couldn't take your eyes off of her, even when James Mason was on. Of course, she didn't steal the film from him; she gave him equal opportunity to startle the audience. The fact she was so generous to her co-stars is one of the many reasons why she continues to endure, even after her untimely death.

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I bet that 90% of us were introduced to Judy Garland in The Wizard of Oz. To this day, it is one of my favorite films, and a critical reason for that was that little Judy had a real voice and I wanted to sing just like her. Although I didn't understand it at the time, she had a grown-up voice in her young girl's body, and I think that her acting was beyond her years also. She expressed so well what I was feeling when I imagined myself dumped in a strange land with people smaller than I, where evil was real, and things were not what they seemed. ("Witches are old and ugly," says Dorothy with such deep belief.

It astonished me when I read a list of her movies to realize that I don't believe I have ever seen an entire Judy Garland movie all the way through. I have seen pieces of several of the Andy Hardy movies, parts of Easter Parade, A Star is Born, and Meet Me in St. Louis, and Till Clouds Roll By. What I did see of Judy was The Judy Garland Show on TV in the early 60s. I was just a kid, but she just blew me away. She could sing, she could dance, she could fill up that little screen. And, until I was older, I didn't associate Judy on TV with The Wizard of Oz at all. She could project so many different faces.

I trained as a singer, so what I always find remarkable with Judy is her musicality and her ability to stay true to the song when she sang. She could put a song over not only with her acting ability and her very mobile face but with the way she turned a phrase. I've probably listened to a lot more recordings of Judy than I have seen movies. Sometimes it's a good thing to turn off the picture and just listen to what she could express with her voice.

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1- My first film was like just everyone else "Wizard of OZ". I remember being so frightened for her and Toto because of that mean old lady on the bike....who would later scare the jeepers out of me as the Wicked Witch..lol.

2-I have seen so Garland movies that I can't say these clips changed my view.  From Wizard...Andy Hardy, St Louis,a Star is Born.  She was just one of if not the most incredible performer to have lived.

3-I hate to repeat what other have said but "A Star Is Born" and the way she sang "The Man Who Got Away".

I know others may disagree but her version of A Star Is..  is my favorite.

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1.     What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her?  Wizard of Oz.  I was just a kid and we watched it on a black and white TV every year.  I remember being blown away by the shift from black and white to color when I saw it at the theater when I was 10 or 11.  I was always fascinated by her voice and sincerity.  When I got older and started seeing the movies she did before Wizard of Oz, I was even more impressed with her talent.  I think the first thing I saw was the “Dear Mr. Gable” clip and then saw her in “Babes in Arms” and “Andy Hardy.”  Over the years, I’ve watched and re-watched everything she’s done with growing admiration.  I always felt she was a good actress, but I changed that to “exceptional actress” when I saw her in “A Star is Born”, “A Child is Waiting”, “Judgment at Nuremberg” and “I Could Go on Singing.”  There is nothing she couldn’t do. 

2.     How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?  I'm very familiar with all of her work and didn’t think I’d notice anything new.  However, Dr. Ament states: “Garland is particularly impressive in this clip for her ability to fake piano mastery although she was not a player, nor did she read a note of music. Notice how she glances back and forth at the music as an accomplished player must, and how her hands match the type of accompaniment in the playback. Also notice how she actually watches the musical score, yet manages to keep her co-star Kelly in her view and focus on the growing flirtation while singing.”  This is such a spot-on observation. While I caught most of that when I watched the movie, I was struck by Judy’s impeccable timing, ease with all of the actions during the scene and her sincere facial expressions when I watched the clip.  She really seems to be enjoying herself here and it’s such a joy to watch.  This is in sharp contrast to her frenetic performance in “The Pirate” which was filmed during a particularly difficult time in her life.

3.     What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?  Her ability to interpret a lyric is certainly evident in “Meet Me in St. Louis”, “A Star is Born” and “I Could Go On Singing” (among others).  I was going to mention the specific songs where she is especially good at it, then realized she does it in every single song.  It was one of her many gifts.  She put her soul into each performance.  I don’t think she ever sang without a deep connection to the song.  Her performances always came right out of her soul.

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BTW, did anyone notice how much Fred Astaire looked like Dick Van Dyke in the clip from Easter Parade. Made me think I need to look at DVD's dancing in Mary Poppins again.

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What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her?

I grew up with my parents playing the recording of "Judy at the Palace" (they had seen her perform in New York on their honeymoon), so I was more aware of her voice long before I remember seeing her on film. It’s hard to say which may have been the first Judy Garland film since one of our local stations televised classic films. I suppose, like many fans, it was one of the early 2television presentations of The Wizard of Oz, so I may have been a little taken aback by the fact that this powerful stage voice was emanating from, essentially a young girl.

But, no matter what the film, you are drawn into a voice that has so much emotion. Some singers, like Bing Crosby or Frank Sinatra, have wonderful phrasing when they sing. Garland possessed not only that same kind of phrasing, but brought so much emotion to her songs as well, whether the song was an outpouring of emotional angst like “Over the Rainbow” or more humorous as in “The Trolley Song.”

 

How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

I’ve been such a huge fan of Judy Garland for so long that I don’t think I view her differently based on these clips because I’ve watched these films (and others) numerous times. However, every time I see one of her films, I always find something new in them.

In later films (whether it was the decision of the producers, directors or Garland herself), there wasn’t as much focus on making her “pretty” in the film’s musical numbers. Here in “A Couple of Swells,” her makeup has blacked out teeth and she wears an ill-fitting oversized suit, oversized clown shoes, and stubble makeup. And it appears as if she’s wearing less eye makeup as well. Astaire, on the other hand, has the stubble makeup, but no blacked out teeth, his shoes look worn but normal size, and his jacket is more fitted to his lean frame. Therefore, the focus in on her singing rather than her appearance. Her comedy is broader maybe because she is so camouflaged.

In For Me and My Gal, an earlier Garland vehicle, you can see the focus is on making her pretty. Despite the fact that the film is set in WWI, the style of costuming is more reminiscent of 1942 with the exaggerated shoulder pad and a hairstyle that is more styled and curled than the 1910s.

I’d also like to touch on the comment that, although not a trained dancer, Garland can keep up with her more trained co-stars. That was another point I’ve always appreciated about her work in film. It’s her attention to detail. I’m certain she rehearsed long hours in order to make her dancing look as effortless as her co-stars’. I noticed, in the second clip, her piano playing also seems far more natural; most actors will pound the keys in only a general location of the correct notes. Here, Garland actually appears to be playing.

 

What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

Of her later films, one of my favorites is A Star is Born. Like many of her early films, her vocal talents encompass not only heart-wrenching songs (“Born in a Trunk” and “The Man that Got Away”) but comical ones like the medley she sings to describe that day’s shooting to husband Norman Maine in their living room.

I was always particularly impressed with her performance in the (non-musical) film A Child is Waiting (1963). There is a particularly emotional scene where she is teaching the song “Snowflakes” to the developmentally challenged children of the school. Within the simple melody she shows her compassion and heart-ache for these children who have been left at the institute by their parents. As the film progresses, she gradually begins to understand how to interact with these children and as she does, how she sings the song also changes.

More importantly, her later non-musical films (Judgment at Nuremberg and A Child is Waiting) prove that she had the acting chops to go along with that marvelous voice.

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Judy Garland is the first actor I remember from musicals because the first musical I remember seeing is The Wizard of Oz. I immediately loved her and could empathize with her. She seemed to really be Dorothy. Of course, I was 4 at the time! But as i continued to watch musicals--particularly those with Judy--I saw that she was always the same wonderful, real person. I was probably influenced a lot by my mother, though, as Judy was one of her favorites, too.

I haven't watched many of Judy's early films with Micky Rooney; I prefer those that came after that had more of a plot and gave Judy greater breadth. The Harvey Girls is a favorite, as is Meet Me in St. Louis. She is perfect in these films. When she drops the guns in the middle of the street and tries to pick them back up, I always laugh. You can tell she comes from a more civilized part of the country. Also, the songs she sings in these two movies advance the plot line, and you can tell the songs weren't just "stuck in" to make a musical. And they're some of the best, toe-tapping tunes from Hollywood.

At the end of Easter Parade when she turns the tables on Fred Astaire, she makes a real blow for women's rights. Good for her! She's not about to let anything stop her; certainly not a man! She's got enough talent to make it on her own, but she allows her man to come along for the ride!

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I think, as was the same with most people, my first Judy Garland movie was "The Wizard of Oz." I was always amazed at how a young girl had such a grown up voice. Year after year, I looked forward to seeing this film & always with my ma, of blessed memory, who shared with me her love for the old time movies & who laughed every time I jumped under the covers when the flying monkeys were on screen. Till this very day, those monkeys still make me feel nervous. I don't view Judy Garland any differently after watching those 2 clips. As I previously stated, my ma shared her love of old movies, especially the musicals, with me. I see Judy Garland as a complete star who could sing, dance, act & pull off ANY role in all movies she starred in. She could make me laugh & could make me cry. She also made me secretly wish I could do half of what she did in any of her movies. I always look forward to watching a film with Judy Garland in it, even the dramatic ones, because I know that I'm watching the very best & versatile actress in Hollywood. I think two of my favorite movies in Judy Garland's "adult" career are probably "Summer Stock" & "In The Good Old Summertime." In both movies, Judy was grown up & belted out a song that just pulled emotion from herself & yours as well in with her. The older she became the more emotion she put into her work, not only in the songs she sang, but in her acting & dancing, generously sharing the stage (or screen)with her co-stars. I don't care who was in the film with her, she made them look good & she always looked like she was having fun.

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1 hour ago, aheadbyecho said:

Until this past weekend I had only seen one Judy Garland movie and we all know which one it was.  Keep in mind, I’ve seen very few musicals in my lifetime.  Since Thursday of last week, I have managed to see the following Judy Garland films: Meet Me In St Louis, The Clock (I had to see her in a non-musical and I’m a little neurotic about chronological order plus I’m seeing my first Vicente Minnelli films this past week as well over at Filmstruck), Strike Up The Band, For Me and My Gal, The Pirate and Easter Parade.  Yesterday I hit up my local library so I have sitting on my desk a copy of The Mickey Rooney & Judy Garland Collection (every list I read mentions Babes On Broadway and Babes In Arms), A Star Is Born and Rainbow (a book collecting various newspaper/ magazine articles throughout the years which moves chronologically through her career; I need background information because, believe it or not, I know next to nothing about her—anyone wanting to recommend a solid bio I’ll be more than happy to investigate it).  Obviously, I’ve been impressed by her!

When I signed up for a musical class more than one person who knew me expressed surprise.  I see a lot of movies (a bare minimum of one a day) and I’ve investigated a lot of genres (my preference is foreign language which isn’t a genre, but you get the picture) but rarely do I take time to see musicals.  I blame Paint Your Wagon which I paid to see in a theatre.  Anyhow when I decided to take this course I knew it would force me to do at least two things I have long avoided: get me to see a second Judy Garland movie and force me to confront Yankee Doodle Dandy (I know that Garland isn’t in that) two things I’ve long stayed away from.

It’s a shame I waited so long in my lifetime to watch Meet Me In St Louis because it is a fabulous movie.  It felt quite authentic in terms of believing this was a family—the scene where Mary Astor quells the argument she and Leon Ames are having by playing ‘their’ song which brings the family out of hiding, Agnes’ donning of Dad’s shoes in the opening minutes, Tootie’s obsession with dead and ghoulish things (and parents who didn’t think that was weird or wrong) culminating in her claim that she would need a week digging up her dead dolls in her doll graveyard; of course the dinner scene where everyone but Dad knows that the phone call will be coming for Rose (and Tootie’s response) even Dad’s threatening to leave Katie the maid behind when they go to NYC.  It feels real and it also feels like classic Hollywood in the most perfect way.

I’ve always believed that Garland was more singer than an actress and could I have been more wrong?  She is equally adept at both making her a consummate musical actress (which you all knew long before I discovered it this past weekend).  That scene where Esther asks John Truett to help her turn out the lights, she is trying so hard to get him to think that he really should try to give her a kiss and it just doesn’t pan out.  I could feel both her anticipation and her annoyance.  Her relationship with Tootie feels so right.  The scene where she sings “Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas” is an absolute highlight and one that will play through my head this coming Christmas whenever I hear that song.

The Clock was absolutely charming and proved she doesn’t need songs to hide behind.  I was completely convinced by her performance that she was in love with Joe Allen the soldier, even after only one day together.  The wordless scene on the second day where she is determining what he takes in his coffee is close to perfect as is her response to the ugliness of a certain event (no spoilers here).  I did think some of her performance in The Pirate was over the top, but then who’s wasn’t in that movie?  And more importantly, it always worked!  I didn’t realize that she worked in comedy as easily as she does.  In Easter Parade her facial expressions in “A Couple of Swells” weren’t ridiculous or excessive, her eyes alone as she walks onto the stage behind Astaire in that song let me know I needed to watch her and not him so when I finally did watch Astaire I realized I was far more rewarded watching Garland.  

Honestly, the class has more than tripled my expectations in just what I’ve witnessed in watching Judy Garland movies.  I certainly didn’t anticipate converting to a Judy Garland fan but that’s how fantastic she is, right? Now, if only I can get through Yankee Doodle Dandy, win or lose, this class will long remain a favorite summer memory! (Let me add one more thing, last night I finally broke down and watched On The Town, another film I’ve long avoided and I could add another page on why I thoroughly loved this movie.  And darn you HUAC for ruining Betty Garrett’s big screen film career!)

 

Don't feel bad about Paint Your Wagon. I paid to see "The Wiz."

 

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1.What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her?

I first saw her in The wizard of Oz.  Being born and raised in Kansas, out on the prairie, she was a typical farm girl as long as she was in Kansas.  Looking back, it may have been too stereotypical.  But as an eight to ten year old, she was my first crush. 

2.How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

Knowing her history - both good and bad makes it hard for me to view her any differently than I have for the past 50 years, she was a talented performer who died much to soon. 

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

I remember the Judy Garland Show and the singing and skits done with other actors and actresses.  Those were some of my favorites.

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My first memory of Judy was Wizard of Oz, but I think that was only because I could relate to it as a child. She made me feel like I could someday sing like her!

The clips showcase some of her amazing ability but since I was raised on these movies, they didn't change my mind about her. She was an amazing performer in every way. The only film that bothers me was The Pirate, where she seemed hyped up and frenetic in her performances, and not quite in touch with her fellow actors. 

Her film, A Star is Born, is wonderful. I get chills every time I see the scene where she spills her guts to her director about her struggle with Norman. She is an emotional wreck, but when they call action, she turns it off and performs as if nothing happened. She makes that lightning quick dousing of emotion so believable looking

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1. The first Judy Garland film I recall watching was The Wizard of Oz. It was a very special, once a year treat at my house growing up. My first impression of Judy Garland was that she had an incredible voice and that she was spunky and sweet. I loved how she defended her dog from "The Bad Witch" even before I knew that character was actually "The Bad Witch." I was rooting for Judy right from the get go and I have been ever since!

2. After viewing these clips, and listening/studying the lesson, I'm amazed at what an incredible talent she truly was and what a gifted storyteller she was when she sang. She could do it all and make it look effortless. 

3. The films in her later career that come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric for me are Easter Parade and A Star is Born

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I am just commenting on the third question. As for communicating the story, for me nothing beats “Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas” From Meet Me in St. Louis. I know that A Star is Born seems to be the favorite, but to me, her voice seems brassy and too broad in this movie. I love how she comforts her little sister, singing about Christmas, her heart breaking, but trying to be strong. I do prefer her younger films to her older ones. 

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Of course, The Wizard of Oz. I started watching it every year on TV with my siblings before I even understood it (I watched it many times before I figured out that the people in Kansas are the same people in Oz). I loved Dorothy and Toto, but I didn't have any understanding of Judy's talent or how amazing the film must've been in 1939. 

I haven't seen many of her films from the middle years -- I look forward to watching several this week -- but loved A Star Is Born. Sadly, I read a biography of her at some point and the unhappy story of her addictions and other struggles kind of turned me away from her -- the TV appearances in her later years made me sad more than anything else. So this week I'm going to try to open my mind to her acting/singing/dancing talent without dwelling on her personal sorrows. The two clips and the lecture showcased her talent in a variety of ways.

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1. What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her?

Like everyone else, the very first Judy Garland film I ever saw was The Wizard of Oz. I was about eight years old and my parents and I were in the local Rent-A-Center to purchase some furniture. I was extremely bored like most eight year olds would be in this type of situation, so I went to look for something to do while my parents were talking to the salesman. Right away, I noticed that they were playing a movie on one of the television displays and so I plopped myself on one of the chairs and watched it. That movie was The Wizard of Oz and I was totally captured by it. I remember being completely dazzled while watching Dorothy being taken on a wild adventure with The Scarecrow, The Tin-Man, and The Cowardly Lion. And Judy's portrayal of Dorothy was quite amazing too. Not only could she mesmerize you with her singing abilities, but acting abilities were quite exceptional as well. Especially, when she sang "Some where Over the Rainbow". It was so sweet and sincere just like the character herself. Ever since that day, I've been in love with Judy ever since.

2. How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

Even after reviewing the clips, I really don't view her too much differently than I did when I was a child. In fact, I was actually dazzled by her even more. I mean, you can really see her growth as a performer evolve quite vastly in both clips and that was only in a couple of years as well. Which only pinpoints the fact that she truly had talent, both as a performer and an actress. You can also see how versatile she is in both performances and that she could definitely hold her own with the likes of Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire. I can see why she was considered to be the ultimate  triple-threat at that time, she had everything you can possible imagine in a performer and she even had star quality to match. That's why when I watch her films now, I'm still completely captivated by her just as I was when I first saw her in The Wizard of Oz as a child.

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

Like most people, the most significant film that come to mind when thinking of Judy would probably be A Star is Born. Mainly because her performance in that film is just so powerful, especially vocally. You can really tell that she's giving the audience her all in every musical performance and that she was definitely happy to be back on the screen again. I honestly think it was one of the best vehicles used for staging such a miraculous comeback and not only for showcasing all of her talents, but also showcasing the fact that she still had it and was even better than ever before. 

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2 hours ago, MotherofZeus said:

On the Town is a gem! Glad you enjoyed it.  It is interesting to revisit movies one once thought not to her liking and find it is now a delight. 

Yes, that is one movie I will be more than happy to watch a second time.

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1.  What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her? 

I have to think that was Wizard of Oz.  They used to show it once every year, maybe around Easter (?) and I loved it from the first viewing.  I could really relate to Judy's character - her emotional conflicts, her wish for a better, happier place.  I think it was her vulnerability as much as anything that endeared her to me.  She shows that vulnerability in many of her roles throughout her career. 

2.  How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

As for my feelings for her regarding Easter Parade and Me and My Gal - I've seen them both so many times - certainly she's more mature and an even more polished performer.  I still see that vulnerability in these films.  I think it's hard for me to let Dorothy go  :)

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

Many other posters have mentioned her excellent work in A Star is Born, which I do agree with.  I also loved her numbers in Summer Stock (especially "Friendly Star") and her rendition of "Look for the Silver Lining" from Til the Clouds Roll By is one of my favorites.  Both of these performances are wistful, vulnerable, romantic and just lovely.  

 

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4 minutes ago, DebW said:

1.  What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her? 

I have to think that was Wizard of Oz.  They used to show it once every year, maybe around Easter (?) and I loved it from the first viewing.  I could really relate to Judy's character - her emotional conflicts, her wish for a better, happier place.  I think it was her vulnerability as much as anything that endeared her to me.  She shows that vulnerability in many of her roles throughout her career. 

2.  How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

As for my feelings for her regarding Easter Parade and Me and My Gal - I've seen them both so many times - certainly she's more mature and an even more polished performer.  I still see that vulnerability in these films.  I think it's hard for me to let Dorothy go  :)

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

Many other posters have mentioned her excellent work in A Star is Born, which I do agree with.  I also loved her numbers in Summer Stock (especially "Friendly Star") and her rendition of "Look for the Silver Lining" from Til the Clouds Roll By is one of my favorites.  Both of these performances are wistful, vulnerable, romantic and just lovely.  

 

"Friendly Star" is a favorite of mine too.

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What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her? How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously? 

My first introduction to Judy Garland was The Wizard of Oz. I thought the acting was bad and I wasnt a fan of the songs. And then on my DVD of Annie Get Your Gun was a a deleted reel of Judy Garland being Annie and singing the song 'Doing What Comes Naturally'. and I felt she was trying to hard to be funny. (Later I learned Judy hadn't even wanted that part). In the clip from Easter Parade with Astaire I thought she was trying too hard again trying to be funny, but also Im not a big fan of slapstick humor and pulling faces. But in her scene with Kelly her true acting abilities shown with "fake" playing the piano and matching Kelly with energy, footwork, and chemistry between the characters!

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