Dr. Vanessa Theme Ament

DAILY DOSE OF DELIGHT #6 (From TWO JUDY GARLAND FILMS)

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1.What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her?

The first movie I remember seeing Judy Garland in was of course The Wizard Of Oz.  I was small enough at the time that I had no clue who she was.  Then I remember seeing the movies with Micky Rooney.  I believe that the first movie that I saw that I honestly knew who she was, was Meet Me In St. Louis.  I Thought she was wonderful. She was so much fun to watch I wanted to see more that she had done.

2.How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

The clips really didn't change my impression of her as a performer.  She was so talented and I always got the sense that she was enjoying herself when she performed.    

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

Summer Stock comes to mind and Easter Parade.  Showed how she had matured from a little girl performing to a woman.  Later I think it was pretty clear when she sang she was putting more Judy into her performances than ever before.   You could see threw her physical presence that this was a woman who had been threw a great deal and it was weighing on her, some of the carefree and light that was there when she was younger was gone, sadly.  But it didn't change the fact that she was wonderful.

 

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1. As with many students of the TCM/Ball State classic film musicals class, the first Judy Garland feature that I recall watching at an early age was "The Wizard of Oz" (1939).  Not sure if it was one of the annual CBS telecasts of the film in the early 90's or if it was the MGM/UA-Turner VHS tape (the special 50th anniversary edition from 1989 with a commemorative mini-booklet) of the film that my parents purchased about a year after I was born.  Another early glimpse of Garland besides "The Wizard of Oz" was the brief clips from a Public Television airing of "That's Entertainment" (1974) sometime in the early-to-mid 1990's; including her work with Mickey Rooney ("Babes in Arms," "Babes on Broadway," etc.) and several of her other notable MGM musicals ("Broadway Melody of 1938," "Meet Me in St. Louis," "The Harvey Girls," etc.).  I thought she was talented.

2. From my aforementioned answer and watching more of her MGM features throughout the years (mostly through Public TV airings and Warners' DVD releases of several of her famous MGM films, since TCM was not available on my local cable system for many years), I don't think my opinion of Garland's work has changed.  Though I did learn more about her triumphs and tragic ending from watching the documentary, "Judy Garland: By Myself" (which I watched on PBS' "American Masters" series back in 2004).

3. The only moment that I can think of in terms of the third question would be her performance of "The Man that Got Away" from George Cukor's re-make of "A Star is Born" (1954) for Warner Bros.  

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Hey, guess what — I grew up in Kansas! Nuff said?

When I was a kid, I was mesmerized by Judy Garland. I remember feeling there was something unique about her. She performs with a truth unlike anyone else. Even in her early films, like all the cute ones with Micky Rooney, she was utterly believable. Then came Meet Me In St. Louis. Garland’s character, Esther, begins the film as an older girl. She is sweet and helpful to her family members, and she dotes on her little sister, Tootie. As she sings “Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas”, Esther is transformed from a pleasant girl into a responsible, maternal young woman. Before our eyes, Garland also grows up in this moment, and everafter her performances are deeper, rounder, more complex. The following year brings The Clock in which Garland gets the chance to stretch her acting chops in a non-musical drama, and she wows audiences. Give her five more years (1950) and it’s Summer Stock in which Garland’s Jane is a hard-working woman who must provide, in one fashion or another, for nearly everyone around her. She is in danger of losing herself until she is saved by Joe and the show. It’s a kind of foreshadowing for the character she will become — not play, but become — the following year in A Star Is Born. We feel every ounce of Garland’s pathos as her Vicki Lester plunges into the exhaltant highs and desperate lows of the career and relationship she so wanted. Let us not forget how brilliantly Garland plays Irene Hoffman in Judgment at Nuremberg. Garland brief appearance in this film is utterly moving. Too often when I hear people discuss Garland’s best works, they omit I Could Go On Singing. For shame! Garland is at her most raw, vulnerable, and transcendent in this film, her true tour de force.

 

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First Judy Garland movie -- and the only one for many years -- The Wizard of Oz. My family was on vacation in British Columbia (from Portland, Oregon) when we were walking on a by a newspaper box that announced her death. I was 10 years old. All I knew of Judy was Wizard of Oz! It never occurred to me that she was any older than how she appeared in the movie I'd seen several times already at that age. Obviously, it made an impression on me all these years later. I've seen most (if not all) since then.

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1.The first film I ever saw Judy Garland in was of course "The Wizard of Oz". My first impression of her was that she had a perfect little smile and great facial expressions which made you feel the scene she was acting out. I also saw her potential as an actress that ability to mature.

2. After watching these two clips I get a much more indepth of her singing ability and her ability to make you feel the scene. She was a great actress and I am glad I have been able to enjoy her work.

3. The later works that showcase her ability to storytell through song are "Meet Me in St Louis", "Easter Parade" (My favorite of hers) and For Me and My Gal. I was exposed to these wonderful films by my Grandmother when I was young and have loved them ever since.

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I saw The Wizard of Oz as a child.  I had read most of the Oz books and was excited by the film. I really liked the film, but Garland's "Dorothy" differed from "Dorothy" in the book, and I was disappointed.  I have seen the film many times and have lost the disappointment.

Judy Garland was (probably) even better than Ginger Rogers as a partner for Fred Astaire.  Astaire did not require any assistance from Garland to hold his own on screen.  The clip demonstrates the difference in their dancing styles; Astaire, even as a tramp, is the most elegant figure in the movies. 

I have always like The Pirate.  Judy has a fun song, "Mack the Black Macoco", on which she cuts loose with her admiration of the joys of being carried away by the fearsome pirate. 

 

 

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What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her?

I think like many people, the first Garland film I saw was The Wizard of Oz.  I was probably 7, and I mostly remember the flying monkeys.  It wasn't until I was much older that I came to appreciate her acting in this movie.

How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

I am much more impressed with her acting skills after finding out from the lecture notes that she didn't read music, play an instrument, and she was not a trained dancer.  Her natural abilities are amazing.  She makes it all look so effortless.

What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

Her song "If You Feel Like Signing, Sing" from Summer Stock remains a favorite of mine.  I think it captures the essence of musicals.  Whenever, wherever, if the mood strikes, celebrate it by belting out a song.

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1. What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her?

First film for me was The Wizard of Oz. I remember seeing it on TV. As a kid, I was not that fond of musicals. This one I watched with my mom. As Dorothy, she was the typical kid. She was respectful, but a little bratty, in the beginning. She had her dog, Toto which she cherished. The movie was whimsical, funny. Looking back now at Judy Garland, as a child actor, she was great. Judy's acting was beyond her years. 

2.  How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

Now that I am older, and have a new fondness for musicals, I see how talented she was. You look at all the hard work it takes to be a "triple threat" (Act/Dance/Sing). In the musicals she starred in, she conveys on screen, innocence, emotion. She makes you feel happy.

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric? 

Meet me in St Louis, is a favorite along with A Star is Born.  In meet me in St Louis, she is a young adult and you see her blossom as a performer. Her voice sounds beautiful when she sings, Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas.

In A Star is Born, you see a true professional at work. The emotions, of her character experiencing life in show business on and off the stage. How it is not always what it seems and the toll it takes mentally and physically. You can feel what she is feeling when she performed.

I would stop, what I am doing to watch either of these films.

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1. As with most, Wizard of Oz was my first Garland movie (in the '60's). My parents were having a dinner party and they put the tv set in the bedroom. My siblings and I were relegated to this room with gave us soda and chips.  I was about 6 or 7 years, TERRIFIED by the flying monkeys and crying hysterically along with Dorothy when she saw Auntie Em in the crystal ball.  I fell in love with Judy's "Somewhere Over The Rainbow" and it has become my #1 favorite song of all time with Oz being my #1 favorite movie (GWTW following close behind).  My husband's ringtone for me on his phone is Judy singing the first phrase of Somewhere Over The Rainbow!  My first impression of her was that she WAS Dorothy!  I believed every emotion she showed in that role. Notice I didn't say "acted." When I first saw the Harvey Girls I remember thinking I couldn't get over Judy being a blond.    

2.  I was able to view all over the Garland movies Tues except for Me And My Gal (and I have seen others in the past). After viewing the clips, I watched her movies with more detail -- paying attention to her progression and experience as a young performer through her years into adulthood.  I've seen several of the Andy Hardy movies but I'm not that big of a fan of them.

3.  As Dr. Ament commented that Judy had a way of singing her songs truthfully, honestly and with authenticity pulling from the pathos of her own life to convey the lyrics of each song.  Her ballads and and torch songs are heart wrenching.  Songs like "We're A Couple Of Swells" swings the pendulum to the other side of her fun, comedic personality allowing us to laugh along, smile, feel good and happy!  When I studied voice, Judy was the first singer I wanted to emulate (followed by Kathryn Grayson, Julie Andrews and Jeannette McDonald--in that order).  I even bought Judy Garland's Songbook and learned EVERY song in it.  Capturing an audience's attention as a storyteller later in her career when she sang I would have say "Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas" immediately comes to mind followed by "The Man That Got Away" in A Star Is Born.

As an aside, there was an instant moment when Judy sang the lyrics, "We're a couple of lads...we'd tell you who we kissed last night but we don't want to be cads..." that I saw Liza's face in Judy's facial expressions and even heard Liza's voice inflections (in that one small phrase).  She's "her mother's daughter."

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1.  “The Wizard of Oz” was the first film I saw with Judy Garland.  I watched it every year when it was an annual TV event.  It was a very special and much anticipated day.  I always wanted ruby slippers like Dorothy’s, and wondered how she felt in them.  I remember how much my family loved “Over the Rainbow”, and I was amazed at the voice that came out of that young girl, and the emotion she was able to evoke still gives me chills. (If you get a chance, listen to Gene Vincent’s wonderful rendition of that song.)  I thought Judy was so pretty when they fixed her up at the Oz Beauty Parlor.  Her hair looked so luxurious and her eyes were riveting.  I also wondered if those flying monkeys, which gave me nightmares, scared Judy while filming. 

2.  It was so nice to see Judy so vivacious, happy, and healthy looking in these clips, with a real sense of humor and joy in what she was doing.  I remember seeing the newspaper photos and film clips of her in her last years, so thin and haggard looking.  Did the studios or their doctors know the dangers of the uppers and downers they were feeding their stars?  If so, did they care? They gave lifelong addictions to so many people who suffered physical and mental illnesses, and in some cases death itself, from this practice.  I remember being shocked at one photo of Judy that showed her legs as thin as toothpicks and her face as looking someone twice her age.  I remember one concert of hers that was shown last year on getTV (they also showed “The Judy Garland Show”) in which Judy seemed too frail to perform.  But somewhere deep inside her, she pulled up every bit of emotion and strength she had, and gave a performance that brought tears to my eyes and the audience to their feet.  To me, it seems like Judy was a young girl, then a young spunky lady, and then an old woman, who wasn’t really old.  Drugs, money woes, failed relationships, and the burden of too much talent sucked the life out of her.  She burned too bright.

3.  In “I Could Go on Singing”, Judy played a singer, and when she sang the title song, she gave it her all and became the song.  Judy would connect with the person or persons to whom she was singing, and you felt like she was entrusting you with her deepest thoughts.  She made singing a very personal experience for the viewer, using her hands and body to express herself.  She would engage you with her eyes and inject a sense of wry humor into her songs, like it was a private joke between you and her.  It was like she was having a meaningful conversation with you.

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I love Judy Garland so much ? the first film I saw her in was The Wizard of Oz (1939) and I thought she was incredible, I wanted so badly to sing like her. In her films, Judy seems happy and oozes enthusiasm and optimism, but it makes one wonder what she went through off camera. But after viewing the Daily Doses clips, I can't say I view her any differently - I love these numbers and Judy's performance, but she hasn't certainly grow up from her days as Dorothy. I especially love her singing in "The Man that Got Away" from A Star is Born (1954). Her voice is strong and not only can you hear the emotion while she sings, but you can see it in her face and eyes. 

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I recall that around every Christmas the Wizard of Oz would be put on, and that we kids would sit around on the floor watching it, eating homemade turkey soup. That was a big part of growing up and made the Wizard of Oz an important film for me, and it still brings back so many memories. That is of course my first recollection of Judy Garland as Dorothy. I can recall thinking later, why not Shirley Temple who fit Frank Baum’s idea of Dorothy better, but she could not have done what Judy did with that role.

 

Next would have been Judy in the Andy Hardy films, remember watching so many of those, and then Meet Me in St. Louis. For me you can really see her growth though in A Star is Born with James Mason. It is a musical and I think that Judy’s acting and all that she is was at the top then. And that film is much better than the Janet Gaynor/Fredrick March version (though I like them both, I will take Judy’s first).

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  1. What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her?

The first film i remember is the wizard of oz.  At the time when i was little, i thought she was just so sweet and pretty. 

  1. How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

Now i am amazed by her natural and pure voice and just likableness.  

  1. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

I remember feeling sad when she sang have yourself a merry little Christmas.  I also feel that when she sings its just so pure and natural that whatever you are seeing along with her singing you can't help but feel it.  

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This thread is absolutely up my alley as Judy Garland is my favorite actress and singer of all time. I've actually been listening to various compilation albums of hers this week in celebration of her birthday.

1. Of course it's cliché, but The Wizard of Oz was my first. My impression of Judy as Dorothy was that she was a warm, inviting personality that I felt concern for even when I was 3. She made me believe everything she portrayed on the screen, and yes, I found her pretty, to boot.

2. Well, I've been watching Easter Parade and For Me and My Gal for years, so I'll put myself in a place of when I first saw them. In the case of Easter Parade, I really was taken aback by just how funny she could be. I think Easter Parade was the third Judy film I ever saw (Meet Me in St. Louis was the second), and while she had moments of comedy in Oz and St. Louis, Easter Parade really let her shine in terms of how she could portray comedic timing. She's not just supporting someone else who's being funny like Mickey Rooney in the four "Let's put on a show" films, but showing off what she can do as a lead and the focus of a scene.

For Me and My Gal is an interesting one because it's a film I like but never put as one of my favorites. Because of that, my viewings of it have been kind of disconnected. It wasn't until this module that I really paid attention to her acting in this. This film shows an interesting transition for her where she's treated as a young leading lady. She's not a little girl surrounding by co-leads and supporting characters that threaten to overshadow her, but she's not the electric and magnetic powerhouse diva that demands your attention later on. She gets to show off a subtle mix of different elements, partially carrying the baggage she acquired from her early films while laying the groundwork for her later ones.

3. A Star is Born is of course so easy. "The Man That Got Away" in particular captures everything about Judy as a performer, but I'm going to point to "Born in a Trunk" as another prime example. While I admit this sequence feels tacked on in the grand scheme of the film's storyline, the entire 15-ish minutes is so entertaining and so encapsulates Judy that I don't care. Throughout this sequence, she's literally narrating her film-within-a-film's character's backstory, and through a series of musical vignettes, we get to see her range. She gets to be sweet ("I'll Get By"), funny ("You Took Advantage of Me"), wry ("Black Bottom"), elegant ("Melancholy Baby"), and powerful ("Swanee" and the finale of "Born in a Trunk"). Judy Garland was a singer and actress who felt every emotion deeply and extremely, and she let the audience in on this in a raw and real way. Nothing about her is on auto-pilot or half-hearted. "Born in a Trunk" makes for an amazing self-contained piece to show someone who wants to know what's so special about Judy Garland.

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The first Judy Garland film I recall watching was the Wizard of Oz. When I was a little girl watching Garland I was fascinated by her beauty and her ability to sing. I wanted to sing the songs she sang in the Wizard of Oz. After viewing these two clips I can see how she remembers a lot of aspects during her performance to keep the audience entertained but to also give some focus to her co-performer. 

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22 hours ago, Warne's Brat said:

I love The Pirate precisely because it's 'goofy.'  I think it's hilarious!  The over the top acting and the screenplay are the reasons I'm drawn to it, whereas the songs, despite being Cole Porter, are only a secondary attraction - and sometimes, dare I say, skippable... 

If anything told Judy it was time to move on from the MGM musical, in my opinion that would have to be Summer Stock.  It's got some lovely moments, but that plot is really outdated for 1950 and it feels like a step backward for both Gene and Judy. 

I went back and watched parts of this again. The Black Mack sequence is truly worth it, and if you take it as being a romp, that goes a long way to making it pleasurable.  It also makes sense as a way to get Gene and Judy in a film together. With her an established star and he a newcomer, the plot plays on that exactly. Her campy performance also foreshadows a lot of her later stage/TV career, so maybe this is more "Judy" than we care to think. Not my favorite from either one of them, but I'm placing it at a higher level than before, especially with some of the information we got today about the "Below the Line" talent.  Thanks for your response.

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1.  Wizard of Oz was of course my first and one of my top 5 Favorite Judy Garland movies:

 

1.  Meet Me In St. Louis

2.  Wizard of Oz

3.  The Harvey Girls

4.  The Pirate

5. The Clock 

I loved the way she started out an innocent, sweet farm girl, that could also stand up for her self during the Mrs. Gulch/Toto confrontational scene.  She showed a range of typical  teenage emotions which developed into a young woman's concerns during her travels to Oz and back home again. Judy also showed her enormous talent and  confidence expertly performing along side the top Vaudevillian seasoned performers of the day with out a hitch! 

2.  I have seen many of her movies over and over again.  What I do find interesting is how unique she really was for a performer in that time period. She was more then a triple threat: singer, dancer, actor, and comedienne! She was a confident and strong performer who started out so young on the stage and anyone who had a chance to work with her knew how professional and talented she was! I also feel very sad for the emotional and physical demands she went through later on in life that made her unhappy and ended her life to soon.

3.  I think Meet Me In St. Louis first showed us her range of adult Judy emotions ( excitement, apprehension, sadness, despair and joy all in one year!) acting skills and of course vocal storytelling ability.  Everything about this movie is perfect and charming! The sets, costumes, the actors and of course the musical performances are engaging and inspiring to one and all.  One thing I love from watching these older films and musicals is they are a "window" to the American way of life back in that era.  It certainly has helped me relate to my parents and their musical roots watching and discussing these films and knowing about their life back in the day! I try to point out these historical, musical, and cultural tidbits when watching these gems with my children or my music students.

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  1. What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her?

Like so many people, Wizard of Oz was my first experience of Judy Garland. My first impression was that this is a master at work. What is there to say about Judy Garland that hasn't already been said? Her ability to wring every bit of emotion out of a song, her charisma - she made me fall in love with musicals.

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1. Of course it was Wizard of Oz. But my view of her changed throughout the decades I’ve been watching it.  She’s gone from that lost little girl, trying to find her way home, to a smart, clever young woman, FINDING her way home.  And I’ve come to realize that Over the Rainbow is quite probably the greatest song in any musical ever

2 Again, just like she grew in Wizard, she grew in her movie roles.  From the silly girl in Andy Hardy films to the kind, loving woman who melted me with “Have yourself a merry little Christmas”.

3. I must confess that if she’s in it, I’ll watch it.  She is funny, like in The Pirate, and silly and beautiful, and oh yeah, she can sing just a little bit. Seriously one of the most beautiful voices EVER.

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1.       The first movie I saw Judy Garland in would be Wizard of Oz. It wasn’t until I was older that I knew who she was, I do not remember what my first impression of her was back then due to being so young.

2.       Now after watching these two clips my impression of her would be that she was a very talented lady who could keep up with the big name of the time for example Gene Kelly in the second clip.

3.       I haven’t watched any of her latter movies. I’ve only seen her in wizard of Oz and Meet me in St. Louis. Going off of these two movies what I notice about her singing ability is that it’s flawless transitioning from talking to singing. As a viewer you don’t pick up on it right away that was talking and now she is singing.  

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1.What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her?

My first Judy Garland film was of course, The Wizard of Oz.  As a child, I was fascinated by her voice, acting, and how comfortable she was with the other characters.  When I watched it at an older age, what impressed me was how someone could be so genuine in her playing a fairytale like story and make it so believable.  

2.How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

I see her as a versatile performer, specifically dancer.  Me and My Gal was an older film and she was a more inexperienced dancer, yet was still able to dance with Kelly.  However, a few years later in Easter Parade, she gains more confidence and performs a charming duet with Fred Astaire.

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

Meet Me in St. Louis is one of my personal favorites, as every song that she sings, she furthers the plot.  From "The Boy Next Door" to "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas", you can pick up on whatever emotion the writers want you to experience through her devoted acting.  

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On 6/12/2018 at 7:06 AM, Dr. Vanessa Theme Ament said:

1.What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her?

2.How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

1. The first Judy Garland film I saw was The Wizard of Oz as a child. I don't remember the age, maybe 4? I didn't know who Judy Garland was then. I don;t remember what my impressions of her  was. I don't think I paid much attention to Dorothy actually. I remember being more interested in the munchkins and the witch than her. I remember my impressions of the movie because it terrified me. When the Wicked Witch of the Witch pops up that was the first time I remember being scared of anything so that is more memorable. 

However, when I got much older and actually got into classic films as a teenager, the first thing I remember seeing her in that I was conscious of who Judy Garland was, was a clip of The Trolley Song (it was being talked about on a show of great movie songs). I remember liking the song not just because it was catchy but because of how she sung it. I felt what she felt when she was singing and describing her emotions about falling in love on a trolley car. I remember thinking she was animated and bubbly and it made me care about what/who she was singing about. She seemed genuinely happy to be both on a train and having a crush. She was sincere. It made me think trolleys were cool. It also made me want to see the full movie to get the context of the song. 

2. I don't really view her differently. Since my first "real" impression of Judy and her talent came from right in the middle of her success in musicals. I thought she really connected to and "sold" both the songs in Easter Parade and For Me and My Gal like she did when I saw her in Meet Me in St Louis. I did note the difference in the two songs in comparison with "The Trolley Song". "We're a Couple of Swells" is a fun gentle satirical song about social status and she has great chemistry with Fred Astaire. They're like best pals. "For Me and My Gal" is a love song and the things she does with Gene Kelly are sweet and charming. They have excellent chemistry too, but its more on the romance spectrum rather than just friendship. So the difference would be that I can appreciate that she was able to sing about other things than love and crushes and marriage. She  was able to perform in other numbers besides courtship numbers. Easter Parade was later in her career so I get the impression that she might not have been allowed or simply given the opportunity to sing about things like social class and rich people when she was younger. She was dressed as chimney sweep and had ash on her face. She is dressed like a man in the baggy costume. She doesn't look pretty but prettiness isn't the point as the song isn't about love and dating. In the two earlier songs she has that wholesome, All American girl quality in her demeanor, costuming and overall appearance (ironically, both "For Me and My Gal" and "The Trolley Song" are set in the turn of the century).

3. I think the obvious answer would be A Star is Born because of the story and the content. Specifically the song "I Was Born in a Trunk". With this movie she is mature and her vocals have matured and she lost the chipper pep of her youthful singing but it has been replaced with an earthy and real adultness (I know its not a word). This works perfectly with the song. She still connects to the song and lyrics like she always did and expresses the emotions but with this song its unique because she was actually a child Vaduevillian and was on stage as a child. She bring with it real life experience and memories that informs her performance of the song and the lyrics. 

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1. The first Judy Garland film that I had ever seen was The Wizard of Oz. I was roughly 2 or 3 years old.  Everytime I watch it, I constantly remember that when I was little I wanted to sing "Over the Rainbow" 'just like Dorothy'. This film also brings back memories of my grandfather re-enacting the Tin Man's dance for "If I Only Had a Heart". It wasn't until many years later that I decided to watch more of her movies just to see the legendary actress she grew up to be.

2. Up until a few years ago, I had known Judy Garland as Dorothy from The Wizard of Oz. But now that I have seen more of her films, including the two that these clips are from, her growth as an actress can really be seen. In the clip from For Me and My Gal, even though Garland couldn't actually play the piano, she did her research and made it believable that she could play the piano. She was able to pick up on the smaller details, such as the way a piano player's hands move, and that alone helped her further develop as an actress.

3. The one film that, to me, is the ultimate climax of her career is definitely A Star is Born. Not only does this film really showcase her ability as a performer, but it also allowed her to captivate the audience in the non-musical sequences as well. There were many moments in this film where I was becoming emotionally invested in this film because of Garland's performance as Esther Blodgett.

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I think, like many others, my first Judy Garland film was The Wizard of Oz. Because I was young I didn't have much of an opinion of her, after all I wasn't watching and dissecting movies then

like I occasionally do now. I wasn't picking up on patterns in acting, lighting, cinematography, or co-star interaction, but if anything, I was probably hypnotized by her singing, I mean who wasn't

mesmerized when she sang "Somewhere Over The Rainbow"? Especially at such a young age.

Since then I have seen a few of her movies here and there, often times I'll be watching a movie and suddenly she shows up on screen and I get wide-eyed and enthusiastically say, "Look! Judy

Garland is in this!" (It's hard to tell she's one of my favorites, isn't it?). There isn't much change in how I view her except that maybe I just like her more as I see her in a variety of roles,

each one showcasing more and more of her talents.

I can't think of any specific examples that showcase her ability to capture an audience because I feel like all of her roles do. Every time she sings you're fixated on every note she hits, when

she dances you're entertained, when she acts, you feel what she feels. She gives it her "all" in everything she does, and it shows. I don't think I have ever been disappointed by a Judy Garland

movie.

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