Dr. Vanessa Theme Ament

DAILY DOSE OF DELIGHT #6 (From TWO JUDY GARLAND FILMS)

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Recall that you watched two clips demonstrating the points made about Judy Garland's nuances and growth as a musical actress. Please respond to the following questions.

1.What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her?

2.How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

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1 What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her?

The first Judy Garland film for me, as it was for many people, was THE WIZARD OF OZ. I was a child, and I remember finding her very relatable and engaging. I see this same connection as I watch the film now with my young daughter, who has made it one of the most requested screenings in our house. Her voice and expressiveness are among her greatest assets, making a song like “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” incredibly iconic through her delivery and emotion. 

2.How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

I have seen both of these films before, so I’m not sure that I really view Judy Garland any differently than I had before; however, I do appreciate the way the lecture notes call attention to the way that Judy is able to do all of the little things right—like reading the music as well as reading her partner—adding an honesty and balance to the scene. It is also interesting to consider her growth as a performer when viewing her career from a chronological perspective.

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

From her later career, the standout Judy Garland performance for me is A STAR IS BORN. The film is a showcase not just for her tremendous voice, but also her great talents as an actress and emotional performer. 
 

 
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Like most people, the Wizard of Oz was the first time I saw Judy Garland perform on film.  My first impression was that she was extremely talented singer and performer.

These clips confirmed her talent as a singer and performer.   It also highlighted her range as an actress.

This is not a film but in the Sixties, Judy Garland had a TV show that once again showcased her talents as a singer and performer.  Here is a clip.  You may want to fast forward through the opening graphic.

 

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1. What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her?

Of course, it has to be The Wizard of Oz for me too. It's hard to remember exact impressions because I was a little girl, but her voice was amazing. She always had this voice so much bigger and richer than you would think it'd be. Her wanting to be a part of the farm and how she tried to stress the importance of her problems to her aunt and uncle is very relatable for a kid. The flying monkeys were also terrifying for a kid haha. 

2.How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

I know a lot about her and have researched her extensively for a finished, but yet unpublished, book. I've seen these movies and many others, so it doesn't change my view, but for people that have only seen Oz, I can see how it would! She is hilarious and grew so much as an actress as she got older. She had a huge range of talents, not just her singing, which is phenomenal. She could learn dance steps like no one's business and her comedic timing was impeccable. 

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

So many.. the first thing I thought of was the song, "Mack the Black" from The Pirate. Such a great clip! She's funny, spunky and tells a story. That whole movie, she does so well, especially considering how rough her life was at the time. Summer Stock is also great. "Get Happy" and "Friendly Star" are not only great songs, but they further the story and "Friendly Star" tells you that she's interested in Gene Kelly's character and not so sure about her current fiance. The dance she and Kelly do at the barn dance is also great for showing how talented of a dancer she was. She can match him so well! It's so fun to watch! 

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1. Like many people, my first view of Judy was in The Wizard of Oz. I didn't initially like her because in her opening scenes she seemed to whine all of the time. Once the film got rolling I realized she had no parents or siblings, was constantly surrounded by only adults, lived from "hand-to-mouth" and could only relate to a dog that gave her outward unconditional love. She grabbed and clung to Toto in desperation. She couldn't be heard by those around her because they were busy trying to survive a harsh world. I understood why she ran away but it was obvious that once the twister was coming that she needed to be with the people who she knew deep down inside loved and protected her. I felt very different about her as she raced back to the farm in an attempt to be with Auntie Em and Uncle Henry at a desperate time. I was heartbroken when the storm cellar door didn't open and when no one could hear her calling. I was just a kid when I saw this film and it made me afraid. That impression has stayed with me for almost 60 years!

2. Judy was one of the few child actresses who transitioned into adulthood. The biggest box office draw, Shirley Temple, didn't fare as well. These film clips show her talents in singing, dancing, relating to her co-star partners, interpreting lyrics as well as dance steps, using props etc. She was a triple threat...she could sing, dance and act. In the Daily Dose #6 film clips she is working opposite a seasoned veteran (Fred Astaire) and a new-comer (Gene Kelly). When she is opposite Fred ("We're A Couple of Swells") she performs like she has had as many years in show business as he has had. She is a mature performer with great timing. When she plays opposite Gene Kelly she brings a youngish flair to the singing, dancing and piano playing. We feel the newness and vitality of youth.

3. "Get Happy" from Summer Stock sticks out in my mind because it is a fully formed, adult Judy. She's sexy and plays to that as she sings opposite these dancing men. The scene opens with Judy hidden from  view. She is unveiled and presented to us in sexy attire...tuxedo jacket, no pants and a hat that she freely tilts in suggestive ways. She doesn't "belt out" the song but delivers it gently and lets it build. The song's lyrics are a stark contrast to the disarray in her personal life that began in the late 1940's. This film came out in 1950 and sadly, it was just around this time that MGM ended Judy's 15 year run.   

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Judy Garland is absolutely my favorite actress of all time (pair her with Gene Kelly and I am in heaven). I became enchanted from the first time I saw her, watching the Wizard of Oz as a very young child- her voice, her beauty, she was sweet. The clips from For Me and My Gal and Easter Parade demonstrate that she was more than the innocent teenager with the big voice- she was a triple threat. She could sing, act and hold her own dancing with Kelly and Astaire. And she was funny- she conveyed her comedic talents not only with the delivery of the song lyrics, but also with her facial expressions and body language. These clips also demonstrate that she was very much the leading lady- she didn’t let someone like a Fred Astaire or Gene Kelly overshadow her- she was their equal. 

 

One of my very favorite movies is Summer Stock. Judy really sells it as the older, responsible sister, left to take care of the family farm, become engaged to the guy everyone expects her to marry while her younger sister runs off to break into show business. But when her sister’s troupe comes back to put on their show at the barn, as much as Judy protests, she lets them stay and even takes the starring role when her sister abandonea the group. When Judy performs Get Happy, you know she wants another life- off of the farm, with Gene Kelly. She was meant to be a performer, too. 

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I'd like to acknowledge the truly astonishing fact that in the dance break of the For Me And My Gal clip - that is all one continuous take.  Not a long sequence, but shows what pros these two were.

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It is hard to remember what Judy Garland film I actually saw first.  It's like she was always there.  Was it the re-release of The Wizard of Oz?  Was it Judgement at Nuremberg?  More likely is that it was the Andy Hardy movies or Easter Parade on TV.  She was ubiquitous in my childhood.

Watching the clips, I find myself appreciating her dancing skills but even more the emotion she brought to her performances.  The sheer joy in these performances is wonderful.  She always was able to bring the right emotion.

Later films that stand out to me are In The Good Old Summertime, Summer Stock and especially A Star Is Born.

 

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What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her?

The first film that I can recall was "The Wizard of Oz".  As I have watched it many times through the years, Judy just seems to get bigger and bigger to me in voice, and acting.  A quintessential performance to be sure. 

How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

Based on input from the lecture video, it is opening my eyes to her astounding overall talent.  Easter Parade always had me focusing on Fred Astaire, but now I can view the film differently.  What an eye-opener.  The "for Me and My Gal" sequence proved what Dr. Ament suggested in the just piano playing alone.  What an amazing talent. 

What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

I believe the standout musical film later in her career was "A Star is Born".  Perfect vehicle for her voice and acting capabilities.  

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1.What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her?

The first Garland movie I watched was THE WIZARD OF OZ. I can't remember exactly when it was, but I was young - either a kid or a young teenager. It aired on TCM and I wasn't a fan of classic movies back then but for some reason I decided to watch it. My first impression of Judy was that she looked older than I did and still she was dressed in something that I perceived as quite childish back then. And then I didn't understand why they were constantly singing in old films, it was fascinating but also annoying.

2.How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

I have not watched any of Judy's films aside from THE WIZARD OF OZ but after watching these two clips, I will definitely check out more of her work. The first clip from Easter Parade impressed me. Fred Astaire is always good, but Judy stole the scene. She really knows how to use her body for comedy, her timing is perfect and her movements are more visible, evident, than Astaire's. In the second clip where she fakes her piano mastery is truly something worthy to be noted. Plus how she still keeps focused on the flirting with Gene Kelly, it's not something a lot of people would be able to pull of with such grace and make it look so easy.

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

Sadly, this is a question I can't answer because I have yet to watch any of her later movies. But I am sure it is something to look forward to.

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To reiterate many others, my first Judy Garland bit was the Wizard of Oz.  I remember as a little girl feeling magical as the movie shifted from sepia to color.  I think most of us wanted to be Judy Garland.

Later in the clips, we see Judy being able to keep up with Fred Astaire (a seasoned performer) and to ease into her performance with Gene Kelly ( just getting into the scene) and yet her performances in each of these clips was tailored to her partner.

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I can't believe that the ONLY Judy Garland movie I've ever seen is Wizard of Oz!  Based on the two clips, I can already see how much I've missed out on and how much catching up I have to do!  It really impossible to watch anyone but Judy when she's on screen, even when she's there with the likes of Fred Astaire or Gene Kelly.

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1.  I saw Garland first in The Wizard of Oz, after listening for a few years to an LP of a truncated version of the film.  I was probably 5, so what impressed me then is not what impresses me now.  Today I am amazed at her rendition of "Over the Rainbow" which is amazingly mature beyond her years.  She had a strong voice that could belt out a song, but here she sings convincingly in an introverted style that lets the song and its lyrics do the talking.  Her simple sincerity expresses much more than one would expect from Dorothy and deepens the character.

2.  Later films show her fulfilling the promise of "Over the Rainbow."  I think first of "After You've Gone" from For Me and My Gal where she combines belting and introspection in one song.  And later in Meet Me in St. Louis she handles a wide range of songs and emotions from the joyous "Trolley Song", to the longing "Boy Next Door" to the quiet "Over the Bannisters", to the lovingly melancholic "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas", and even to the vaudeville song and dance "Under the Bamboo Tree".  Clearly no one trick pony.

Also in For Me and My Gal, she dances with aplomb.  The Wizard of Oz did not prepare us for this.  She continues to improve her dancing until she is able to dance confidently with Astaire, often as the focus of our attention.

And she grew as an actress too.  In The Pirate she handles sophisticated comedy.  A Star is Born and Judgement at Nuremberg show her as an accomplished actress who delivers much more than a song or dance (though she delivers those too beautifully).

3.  As for songs where she captures our imagination while singing a lyric, I think you could pick just about any song she sang and make a case for it.  Certainly "After You've Gone" where her character veers off course as she realizes how the lyrics apply to herself.  Or "Look For the Silver Lining", "But Not for Me", "Mack the Black", or even "Johnny One Note".  And most impressively with "I Can't Give You Anything But Love" from her concert period.  Here she takes a song that I had usually heard as a relatively upbeat number, slows it down into a ballad, caresses every note, and delivers a performance that is as moving as it is beautiful.

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  1. What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her? I watched (like many) The Wizard of Oz when I was a child. I had no impression on her just because I was a young child back in the 80s.
  2. How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously? Well both clips have 2 different feelings. The first from Easter Parade you can tell its a song and dance clip and everything is happy. But the other clip is from wartime and depending what was going on back then a song can bring happiness to someone if only for a moment...if you have never listened to the radio show "commend performance" it was a weekly show for the troops.
  3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric? I would say A Star is Born. Because in someway that film was about Judy Garland a true auto bio about her own life. She started young as a child then everyone saw her grow up on screen (also type casted), then when you hit it big all you can do is go down and then have a come back. That what a star is born is for me with her in it a come back picture

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1. What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her?

I believe the first film of her's that I recall watching was, The Wizard of Oz.  Back in the day, The Wizard of Oz came on once a year so when you saw it listed in the TV Guide it was a really big deal. 

All week your whole family looked forward to Saturday or Sunday night (it always came on at Primetime on the weekend). When the day and time finally arrived us kids got into our pajamas while Mom popped the Jiffypop and Dad made the coffee. Then everyone sat down and enjoyed this wonderful movie together.

As a kid my first impression of Judy Garland was that she was a great singer. I sang in school plays when I was younger and I recall trying to imitate her singing, Over the Rainbow but never quite was able to sing like her (little wonder). I also remember trying to imitate how friendly she was. I was shy so I admired how outgoing she was. Her character was brave and adventurous and I wanted to be just like her. She was bubbly and a really nice person, she had a cute smart dog and was friends with a scarecrow, a tin man and a lion! Plus she rode a tornedo to a magical place with good witches, wicked witches and flying monkeys. And she took it all in stride. Who didn't want to be Judy Garland?

2. How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously? 

I always thought of her as extremely talented. A once in a generation talent. But after intently watching and listening to her in the clips you really begin to recognize how truly focused and talented she was. 

It not only took a tremendous talent to sing, dance and act her part but her concentration to make it all seem fresh and natural, her professional spirit, comedic timing and her generosity with her fellow stars is truly stunning.

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

I would have to say, A Star is Born. Her voice is still perfect but her maturity as a person and a performer who has herself experienced the highs and lows of stardom brought a wisdom and winsomeness to her singing. She evokes both a certain buoyancy in the upbeat early stages of the film but yet a heartfelt poignancy and realism to the songs in the latter stages of the film. Her phrasing and intonation along with these qualities help propel the movie forward bringing her audience along for the ride on her emotional rollercoaster.

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1.  The Wizard of Oz was my first Judy Garland movie I can recall. She was everything in that movie. Touching, funny, caring, dramatic, etc., and  she was only 16-17 when she made that film.  She showed a wide range of emotions with little acting experience or training. I think she was probably an actor who used her own personal ups and downs as resources for her acting.  I don’t think Garland fans of the 1940s  were aware of her personal struggles as fans of today are.  In 2018, Judy Garland admirers are aware of her life struggles and can see where she gets that emotional intensity in her acting and song performances such as in A Star is Born in 1954. 

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First film I saw of Judy's was, naturally, The Wizard of Oz. Her beauty and extraordinary talent won me over and basically was the first stepping stone to falling in love with classic films.

Later films I saw further proved she was quite the talent with her singing style and even choreography. She was so naive and innocent in The Wizard of Oz, and continued that with Andy Hardy films. As the 40s progressed she starts to become more mature and by the 50s, very sophisticated (what was happening off screen was nothing short of tragic)

In the "For Me and My Gal" clip you can tell how she is progressing as she nails the song after Gene Kelly's first attempt. (I also send this clip to anybody I know on social media who's getting married)

Meet Me in St. Louis does show her storytelling ability, especially with "The Trolley Song" as she excitedly tells about the boy on the trolley as she flitters about. And, her zenith was in "A Star is Born" playing the star who rises to the top as her husband hits rock bottom...and you can tell how her life is on and off screen as she belts out "The Man That Got Away".

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1: The first film I remember Judy Garland in was The Wizard of Oz. I remembered three things about the film when I was small more than than anything else; those dreaded flying monkeys, the witch and Judy singing Somewhere over the Rainbow. I always attempted to sing it in my room it was not a good sound. For a movie filled with fascinating things to absorb a kid of about nine and then to have a song be one of the stand out features, that’s pretty impressive I would say. 

2: I don’t really view her differently but with more insight from reading and then watching the lectures. I did see how versatile she was but I already knew that. 

3: I am going to have to say A Star is Born. Just because of the story being told and the maturity and wisdom that you can hear in Judy’s voice. 

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1.    What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her? Like most here, my first Judy Garland film was The Wizard of Oz, every year on TV in the late 1960s & early ‘70s. My impression was that she was a very natural performer, believing in Oz, and possessing a deeply beautiful and emotive voice.

2.    How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously? These clips show Judy’s famous sense of humor. In “A Couple of Swells,” she and Fred Astaire make a fully choreographed dance look like playing. Freed of the need to be glamorous (MGM famously and relentlessly kept her thin), she flops around, grins, and seems to have a blast as a male tramp. Note the funny faces they both make after “We’d like to tell you who we kissed last night, but we can’t be cads.” In “For Me and My Gal,” she’s paired with MGM’s other great male dancing star, Gene Kelly. Like Astaire, he likes to have fun when he’s dancing and he and Judy share lots of funny moments, including the counting of future children: “Or three.” “Or four.” “Or five.” Gene: “Or a maybe more,” at which Judy humorously seems to suddenly realize what a burden more than five children would mean. She also proves herself a worthy hoofer.

3.    What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric? It’s the obvious one, but “The Man That Got Away” from A Star Is Born (1954) is one of the most deeply felt torch songs ever performed on film. I’m guessing we’ll talk about A Star is Born next week, so I’ll save my specific thoughts for then.

gene-kelly-judy-garland.jpg

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  1. What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her?.... I saw the Wizard of Oz for the first time on tv when I was a child. I was probably about 5 or 6 (early 1960s) and we watched it on the tv in my Great Grandmother's living room because we didn't have "cable" at home. My first impression was that Judy Garland really was Dorothy, and more than anything else, I wanted to "be" Dorothy. Nobody seemed to mind that I danced along with a movie I'd never seen (fumbling my way through the steps as I tried to learn as the movie went along- I am not, and never have been, anybody's idea of a "dancer"), singing along with songs that were familiar because we had a recording of the soundtrack and I did know the words (and, again, nobody's ever going to confuse me with a "singer")
  2. How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously.....There is such a huge spectrum to Judy Garland's talent. Astaire and Kelly were prolific dancers, Judy Garland was perhaps more of a "triple threat" who could act the heck out of a scene, deliver any song, and could hold her own with two notorious perfectionist dancers without being a Ginger Rogers, Ann Miller or Vera-Ellen. These clips show that "Dorothy" is all grown up and although the viewer might find it hard to take their eyes off her, she's a generous co-star who's by no means "stealing the scene" and whose performance compliments her co-stars' and makes the scenes a definite combined effort of great talent.
  3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?......A Star is Born: if "The Man That Got Away" doesn't give you chills, you should see a doctor to make sure you still have a pulse.
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1. What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your impression of her?

At the age of five my mother took me to see the re-release of Wizard of Oz at the Loew's Pitkin in Brooklyn. The two things I remember most were diving with fright under the seat when the Wicked Witch first appeared in Munchkinland. My other lasting memory was how spunky and take charge Dorothy behaved, while still showing unbounded empathy for the rest of the characters, notwithstanding her plight of being whisked far from home and not knowing if she would ever return. Garland commanded the screen even at the relatively tender age of 16.

2. How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously?

Having watched her films for over 60 years, viewing these clips did not really have any impact on my impression of her as a performer. However, they do serve to remind you how versatile and talented she was. Few performers could handle singing, dancing, comedic and romantic/dramatic parts as well as she could. From Wizard of Oz to The Pirate to Judgment at Nuremberg, we see the full spectrum of her boundless abilities displayed on the silver screen.

3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience's imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric?

The standout performance in her later years was without question A Star is Born. Backed by superb songs from Harold Arlen and Ira Gershwin, George Gershwin and Rodgers and Hart, among others, Garland was able to once again capture the attention of the audience with her renditions of tunes like The Man Who Got Away and Swanee. But most poignantly -- most relevant to this question -- she actually plays the part of a storyteller in the Born in a Trunk number. The only other performer who could both sing and tell a story as well as Garland was Frank Sinatra. Not bad company to be in, IMHO!

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1-I would love to have a different answer than everyone else, but let's face it, "The Wizard Of Oz" is going to be the main answer, and as well it should! Lots of things get called "classics" but I can think of no better textbook example than "Oz". What I remember most is, growing up, we did not have cable, and no VHS/DVD player at that time, so the only way you would get to see a favourite movie was to search for it in the weekly TV guide and pray it would come on. "Oz" was always shown at Christmas and I would wait all year, knowing I would get my shot at watching it, just once, over the holidays. I remember seeing Judy in colour for the first time and thinking how pretty she was, that the Technicolor red-brown hair was the most perfect colour I had seen in someone's hair ever, and that she was perfect to me, in every, single, way. Even after watching the film, for days, months after, I would chuckle thinking about the Lion, and my eyes would recall every bright Technicolor moment when she first lands in Oz, and my Dad would scare the heck out of me by shrieking "I'll get you my pretty" here and there :)

 

2-My childhood Judy was all Dorothy, I remember being confused at first that she could be in any other movie, as any other role, it took me a while to understand and get that she was an actress, not just "Dorothy". I have seen all her movies and appearances, from the round cheeked little girl to her later years when she was clearly struggling behind the scenes, it's so hard to disconnect the knowledge of her sadness and struggles with any performance she does. Could she do it all? Yes! Her comedic roles always impressed me most, it seems most people associate her with sadness, soulful ballads, but she could be flat out hysterical, and I think it's nice to think of her like that, giving us joy, but hopefully finding it for herself too.

 

3-I know this may be sacrilege, but I confess that I have never been a fan of Judy's version of "A Star Is Born" (I can't disassociate her sadness at the time in her life) BUT no one can deny that her rendition of "The Man That Got Away" isn't an exemplary example of how to take a lyric and squeeze out every ounce of emotion, heart and soul. In fact all of her songs from this film show the RAW pain and heart on sleeve ability she had to get everything out of a lyric and a narrative. No doubt some of this is due to the fact that she herself could no longer keep back a lot of personal emotions and anxieties, but it did push her acting to the next level. 

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l saw the clips and thinks that Judy was the best in Easter Parade . l saw her in the Wizard of OZ, Meat me in St Louis and l really enjoyed her in that one she real was able to show how she could sing and her and the little sister and such a beautiful relationship that you real believed in them. l love to watch that movie over and over again

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Boy, I honestly don't know what my first Judy Garland movie was.  It might have been the Wizard of Oz or the Andy Hardy movies or Meet Me in St. Louis (my personal favorite) or  Easter Parade or In The Good Old Summertime.  She has done so many films that are absolutely wonderful. Judy Garland is one of those performers who has it all and she appeals to so many people, young and old alike, on so many levels.  You see her dancing and singing, her comedic timing.  

I really don't view her any differently after viewing this clips because I always thought of her as a wonderful performer who can do it all.  She can take you to that magical place where you just loose yourself in the music and dance and the story. She plays well off any of her co-stars, be it Fred Astaire or Gene Kelly or Van Johnson or Margaret O'Brien. 

A Star Is Born is the obvious answer because it does show how she as grown as a person, performer, dancer and singer.  By the time A Star Is Born was made, she had gone through so many personal struggles that it just comes out in her performances.

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1- Oddly enough my first Judy movie wasn't "Oz".  It was "Presenting Lily Mars", with Van Heflin.  In NY there was a program on a local station, "The Million Dollar Movie" that broadcast the same movie all week long! One of those films was "Mars". (Perhaps that's why to this day I can practically recite certain lines from certain movies because I was brainwashed by watching them over & over & over.:lol:)

In that film I thought she was beautiful, carefree, lighthearted & loved her voice.

2- I don't view her - personally or critically or talent-wise - any differently in either clip.

3- As a few others have already noted, her rendition of "The Man That Got Away" in "A Star Is Born" was quintessentially Judy, more specifically as she matured.  It was Judy "singing" a story at Judy's very best.  Although that movie was from the mid fifties, I believe after a few setbacks, it paved the way for her future more mature song styling on her tv program and definitely in her concerts.  

 

 

 

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