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drednm

Marion Davies & Leslie Howard

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MARION DAVIES personally selected LESLIE HOWARD as her leading man for FIVE AND TEN (1931) after seeing him in "Berkeley Square" on Broadway. The story is loosely based on Barbara Hutton (the Woolworth heiress) and the building of the Woolworth Tower in NYC. TCM is showing this on June 25 as part of Howard's Star of the Month salute.

Here's a shot of Davies and Howard atop a city building.

 

c536efa868e02fff62e97d8a8abd3ab8.jpg

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Soory but Leslie was as dull & drippy as dishwater, though she had talent,. especially comedic of which Hearst wouldn't let her display, wanting her in heavy costume dramas instead

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19 hours ago, spence said:

Soory but Leslie was as dull & drippy as dishwater.

I guess I must like dishwater then. ;)

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7 hours ago, spence said:

Soory but Leslie was as dull & drippy as dishwater, though she had talent,. especially comedic of which Hearst wouldn't let her display, wanting her in heavy costume dramas instead

Davies made 4 costume pictures. FOUR out of FOUR DOZEN. And one of those was a drawing room comedy.

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1 hour ago, sagebrush said:

I guess I must like dishwater then. ;)

:D

Come to think of it( and you'll LIKE this:)...

I usually keep MY dishwater pretty HOT!  ;)

Now that Howard too, has been brought up (and his SOTM thing) I remember a friend of mine, after his first viewing of THE SCARLET PIMPERNEL asking, "Didn't they steal that idea from ZORRO?  :D  I told him it was likely the other way around, as PIMPERNEL was based on a 1903 play by BARONESS ORCZY,  and Zorro didn't show up until 1919.  And BATMAN could be said to use the same trope.

What was funny too, was that HE thought the ZORRO legend was based on FACT!  :o

Sepiatone

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Sepia said: What was funny too, was that HE thought the ZORRO legend was based on FACT!

I'm no longer amused or amazed by ignorance or stupidity. Consider this earlier post:

Soory but Leslie was as dull & drippy as dishwater, though she had talent,. especially comedic of which Hearst wouldn't let her display, wanting her in heavy costume dramas instead

Thank you drednm, for keeping us informed about Davies.

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Y'know, I'm still wondering as to why both Mr. Howard and Ms. Davies were brought up in the SAME THREAD?  I mean, what was especially poignant about Marion Davies personally "selecting" Leslie Howard as her leading man? Except maybe the RARITY of most cast members in most movies having ANY say in whom they're to work with?

Sepiatone

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... and speaking of MARION DAVIES and LESLIE HOWARD, Davies was announced by Warners to star in a production of TWELFTH NIGHT under the direction of Max Reinhardt, who had just wrapped A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM. MGM had announced ROMEO AND JULIET and 20th Century Fox had announced AS YOU LIKE IT (bother of which tanked at the box office).

Warners planned to star Davies as Viola and Howard was mentioned as Orsino. Reinhardt was coming off the (mostly) critically acclaimed film (which is stunning) which basically broke even. By December of 1936 all the Shakespeare projects in town were scrubbed. Reinhardt never made another film.

This was a major disappointment for Davies. The cross-dressing role of Viola who disguises herself as Cesario would have been a romp for her, having cross-dressed in two silent hits: LITTLE OLD NEW YORK and BEVERLY OF GRAUSTARK.

 

BARD.jpg

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Hearst has tried to snag MAX REINHARDT in the 1920s as well, but nothing came of it.

REINHARDT TWO.jpg

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Her next film after JANICE MEREDITH was LIGHTS OF OLD BROADWAY directed by Monta Bell. Then she made BEVERLY OF GRAUSTARK directed by Sidney Franklin.

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Funny, but I can't find anything on WHY Reinhardt apparently bailed on the contract in 1924.

 

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Maybe creative differences with Hearst. This would explain why Reinhardt didn't make a film until 1935, if Hearst had him blacklisted.

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53 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Maybe creative differences with Hearst. This would explain why Reinhardt didn't make a film until 1935, if Hearst had him blacklisted.

Seems unlikely since he and Warners were ready to snag Reinhardt for Davies in 1935. Reinhardt had made on a few silent films. He just didn't seem to like film. Even his 1935 was largely a filmed version of his staged presentation. Hearst certainly knew talent. He signed Reinhardt in 1924 after he and Davies had seen the Broadway production of "The Miracle," which had starred Diana Manners. Reinhardt was also a friend of Joseph Urban, whom Hearst had snagged in the early 1920s.

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On 6/12/2018 at 10:47 PM, spence said:

Soory but Leslie was as dull & drippy as dishwater, though she had talent,. especially comedic of which Hearst wouldn't let her display, wanting her in heavy costume dramas instead

"Dull" guys make the best dates! 

They never talk about themselves, flex their muscles, talk about old girlfriends, check the mirrors out, or flirt with waitresses and they always pick up the check.

Wally Cox was an Adonis!

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On 6/13/2018 at 5:41 AM, sagebrush said:

I guess I must like dishwater then. ;)

 I always found some dishwater to be very sexy, understated and ethereal, like Mr. Howard himself.

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While the Hungarian-born Leslie Howard specialized in playing British gentlemen (a lost breed in today's world, British or otherwise), his real life  (and death) was anything but. Watch my friend Tom Hamilton's terrific documentary on Howard on June 18. You'll have a better appreciation of Leslie Howard.

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On 6/16/2018 at 6:10 AM, drednm said:

While the Hungarian-born Leslie Howard specialized in playing British gentlemen (a lost breed in today's world, British or otherwise), his real life  (and death) was anything but. Watch my friend Tom Hamilton's terrific documentary on Howard on June 18. You'll have a better appreciation of Leslie Howard.

Leslie was born in England, but his father was born in Hungary.

As a child he was my favorite actor and I was fortunate to find his biography in the public library. This biography was written by his daughter Ruth Howard. She stated that he initially spoke German and had to later learn English.

Apparently his mother was part German and part English.

 

The quintessential  English gentleman actor whom everyone remembers, George Sanders,  was the one who was actually born in Russia and grew up speaking Russian. If not for the Russian Revolution and his family fleeing it to England, George Sanders may have been one of the greatest Russian actors of all time.

 

BTW--My mother was a great fan of Marion Davies and she always wondered why Marion did not become a bigger movie star. She told me that Marion was very popular and not at all as untalented or an  embarrassment as the character in Orson Welles' "Citizen Kane", which allegedly portrayed her. 

 

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Yup you got me on that one!

Davies actually WAS a big movie star. Like a lot of other big movie stars of the era, we've forgotten what a star looks she was.

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People seldom mention Leslie's son Ronald. Ronald Howard looked just like his father. He starred in many low-budget British films as well as the 1954 American TV series Sherlock Holmes. Here's a picture of Ronald Howard:

Screen Shot 2018-06-17 at 4.15.11 PM.jpg

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On 6/16/2018 at 7:10 AM, drednm said:

 Watch my friend Tom Hamilton's terrific documentary on Howard on June 18. You'll have a better appreciation of Leslie Howard.

I recorded it & can't wait to watch it!

 

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2 hours ago, TopBilled said:

People seldom mention Leslie's son Ronald. Ronald Howard looked just like his father. He starred in many low-budget British films as well as the 1954 American TV series Sherlock Holmes. Here's a picture of Ronald Howard:

Screen Shot 2018-06-17 at 4.15.11 PM.jpg

His daughter Leslie Ruth Howard made one film appearance as an actress. She also appears in Tom's documentary.

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