CherylPH

Surprised No Danny Kaye Movies

29 posts in this topic

I know there are only so many hours in a day & that we're viewing musicals that we all love for this course. Having said that, I'm surprised & even a bit shocked that there is not one Danny Kaye film included in any of these listings. I love "The Court Jester," "A Song is Born" & even "White Christmas." The man was a genius & could do it all...sing, dance, act & was truly funny because of his physical comedy (doing many of his own stunts) & rapid-fire novelty songs. He could make you think he's speaking a foreign language when it's mostly gibberish. Who could forget the schtick, "the pellet with the poison's in the vessel with the pestle; the chalice from the palace has the brew that is true!" Then there's "A Song is Born" with a plethora of musicians who were seen in many of the films we're watching now. Danny doesn't sing in this movie but Virginia Mayo does as do many of the other acts in this movie. As I said, I know there are only so many hours in the day & only so many movies they can show on Tuesdays & Thursdays but they could have showed one of his movies. Oh well, next course... I'm still loving all of these movies. It's a good thing I'm off for the summer because I couldn't teach school after staying up all day & night & watching most of these movies..LOL

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I was disappointed in the absence of Kaye films, as well. His film talents were unique. My favorite is THE COURT JESTER, which I had hoped would be on the schedule and hasn't been shown in years. ?

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The Court Jester is brilliant.  One of my favourite films!

It does seem to me that in this course an inordinatoe emphasis has been placed on a few specific people (*cough* Judy Garland) to the exclusion of others that deserved mention.

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They could have included THE INSPECTOR GENERAL since it's in the public domain. So there's no reason why he couldn't have been represented on this schedule with at least one film.

But I think they're too busy showcasing Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire. And that's fine. But a little variety never hurt anyone!

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I have always adored Danny since the very first time I saw him skipping down the yellow brick road to introduce The Wizard of Oz (in another post I mentioned he might have been my first crush).  It's hard to say which of his movies are my favorite, it's like which of your kids do you love best?  I love The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, for his "Symphony for the Unstrung Tongue",  The Court Jester for... no not "The Pellet with the poison" but the beautiful lullaby "I'll Take You Dreaming" and then there's the lobby number "Manic Depressive Pictures Presents" from Up In Arms (TCM has the video clip)and then there is this from The Five Pennies, I thought I'd share since we won't be viewing any of the incomparable Mr. Kaye's movies.

 

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I think it's a copyright issue. Danny Kaye was Paramount and I don't think TCM owns the rights to their full archive as they do with MGM, RKO, and Warner Brothers. We didn't really talk about Paramount musicals in the 1930s last week. Paramount had most of the popular radio stars in the 30s like Bing Crosby, Jack Benny, Bob Hope, and Burns and Allen. Their musical boilerplates were "The Big Brodcast" movies, which they cranked the way warner brothers cranked out their Golddiggers and MGM cranked out their Broadway Melodies. 

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In reviewing material to make notes for the quiz (yes, I actually do that), other than Yankee Doodle Dandy from Warners, the emphasis is squarely on MGM and Garland, Kelly, et. al for the 1940s, principally a handful of films.

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1 minute ago, MareyMac said:

In reviewing material to make notes for the quiz (yes, I actually do that), other than Yankee Doodle Dandy from Warners, the emphasis is squarely on MGM and Garland, Kelly, et. al for the 1940s, principally a handful of films.

Yes, there's a studio bias. They are positing the notion that musical=MGM.

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37 minutes ago, Smulvihi said:

I think it's a copyright issue. Danny Kaye was Paramount and I don't think TCM owns the rights to their full archive as they do with MGM, RKO, and Warner Brothers. We didn't really talk about Paramount musicals in the 1930s last week.

The Love Parade, discussed last week, was a Paramount picture

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12 minutes ago, MareyMac said:

The Love Parade, discussed last week, was a Paramount picture

Yes, so it's not a copyright issue. It's a financial issue. They are only willing to spend x-amount of dollars leasing films from outside studios. They have a budget, and it's understandable. But unfortunately it keeps a course of study like this from being as comprehensive across studios as it should be.

They're also failing to include British musicals. And animated musicals.

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I agree that the emphasis is narrow -- Judy Garland, Fred Astaire, Judy Garland, Gene Kelly, Judy Garland, Judy Garland. LOL  It could be a financial issue or it could just be the personal preferences of the instructors and organizers (Prof. Ament confessed her admiration for Judy Garland in one of the video lectures).  But if it is indeed a financial issue, I can't fault them.  The course is free, after all. Maybe a list of supplementary films would be helpful -- things not included in the course but which partiicipants might want to watch on their own. 

 

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6 minutes ago, Charlie's Girl said:

I agree that the emphasis is narrow -- Judy Garland, Fred Astaire, Judy Garland, Gene Kelly, Judy Garland, Judy Garland. LOL  It could be a financial issue or it could just be the personal preferences of the instructors and organizers (Prof. Ament confessed her admiration for Judy Garland in one of the video lectures).  But if it is indeed a financial issue, I can't fault them.  The course is free, after all. Maybe a list of supplementary films would be helpful -- things not included in the course but which participants might want to watch on their own. 

Wonderful idea...my guess is people are already making their own lists. Especially those who love musicals and want to see examples which feature stars from other studios.

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6 hours ago, Smulvihi said:

I think it's a copyright issue. Danny Kaye was Paramount and I don't think TCM owns the rights to their full archive as they do with MGM, RKO, and Warner Brothers. We didn't really talk about Paramount musicals in the 1930s last week. Paramount had most of the popular radio stars in the 30s like Bing Crosby, Jack Benny, Bob Hope, and Burns and Allen. Their musical boilerplates were "The Big Brodcast" movies, which they cranked the way warner brothers cranked out their Golddiggers and MGM cranked out their Broadway Melodies. 

I don't think it's a copyright issue. I have almost all of my favorite Danny Kaye movies on DVR & I got them on TCM. They showed these movies on what would have been (I believe) his 100th birthday. I never get tired of them. Again, I wasn't trying to nitpick here because the people who put this course together know more of what they're doing than I am. I was just a bit disappointed that not one of his films was used as an example of a musical in the 40s/50s. He had so many good ones & I've seen them all at least a gazillion times...LOL. I think it's a matter of showing so many movies over 4 decades. Imagine if they did all of the musicals WE ALL loved? This course would run for many months & I would never get any sleep...LOL.

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5 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Wonderful idea...my guess is people are already making their own lists. Especially those who love musicals and want to see examples which feature stars from other studios.

Maybe those that put this course together could put together another course like this one...Part Deux, utilizing other movies discussing other points they didn't or couldn't discuss because of time/money.

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This man is pure genius. For your viewing pleasure, Danny Kaye's linguistic versatility...LOL

 

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i really enjoyed that clip...everyone on this thread makes some great points about Danny Kaye and why he should of been at least talked about ... 

 

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7 hours ago, CherylPH said:

Maybe those that put this course together could put together another course like this one...Part Deux, utilizing other movies discussing other points they didn't or couldn't discuss because of time/money.

...Or, maybe we the fans could start a forum topic, under this mad about musicals heading, and add our own chosen video clips and synopsis' of the actors/films which weren't represented in the salute.

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4 minutes ago, sagebrush said:

...Or, maybe we the fans could start a forum topic, under this mad about musicals heading, and add our own chosen video clips and synopsis' of the actors/films which weren't represented in the salute.

Excellent idea.

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I'm just surprised that Week 1 talked about house style of various studio musicals in the 30s and it's not even mentioned in Week 2. I know MGM was the major studio for big Technicolor musicals in the 40s, but what other studios were doing should at least get a mention. All the behind the scenes experts covered (set & costume, scriptwriting, editing, etc) were all MGM as well.

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49 minutes ago, MareyMac said:

I'm just surprised that Week 1 talked about house style of various studio musicals in the 30s and it's not even mentioned in Week 2. I know MGM was the major studio for big Technicolor musicals in the 40s, but what other studios were doing should at least get a mention. All the behind the scenes experts covered (set & costume, scriptwriting, editing, etc) were all MGM as well.

Right. It's a bias, because the course has been designed to promote what's in the Turner/TCM library. And on some level to generate DVD sales for films they own, not films the other studios own. Or to promote subscriptions for FilmStruck their online streaming service where these films, not films from other studios, are found.

You have to take all this into account.

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Although there was a bias to promote mostly MGM musicals, at the beginning of the course it's mentioned there were 5 major studios that produced musicals. As I said earlier, there is room for a Part Deux, Part Trois & even Part Quatre. You had musicals coming out of MGM, Paramount, RKO, 20th Century Fox & Warner Brothers. There were so many musicals coming out of each studio, a course can be written on each of the studios. I suppose MGM was mostly used in this course because of their budgetary "grand productions." They boasted having most of Hollywood's stars & would often loan their actors out for other films. They had the greatest sound stages, lots & a plethora of the best "behind-the-scenes" talent (directors, choreographers, editors, cinematographers, all sorts of technicians, scene builders & designers of everything else). I'm assuming the other studios had enough talent to stay afloat during the golden age of Hollywood or we would only have movies from MGM. I'm having a ball with this course & will be greatly saddened once it's over. I hope there will be more later on but not during the school year or I won't be able to stay up all day & night watching musicals...LOL.

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The Court Jester is genius.  And I also love The Five Pennies and this number.

 

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1 minute ago, Charlie's Girl said:

I thought it was Kathy Selden.  ?

Oh that's right. Kathy was in huge demand. But she might have been off on a second honeymoon with Don Lockwood when Danny Kaye and Barbara Bel Geddes made THE FIVE PENNIES.

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