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DAILY DOSE OF DELIGHT #9 (From THE BAND WAGON)

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The interaction at first is supportive and encouraging. It's when they start to sing and dance that it turns to play. They really seem to enjoy goofing around with each other. But it is an interesting difference from past musicals. Not one person is the star. Even though this song is to encourage Fred Astaire's character, they are all encouraging each other and having lots of fun. I'm thinking of how different this scene was to a previous clip that included Fred Astaire. He was singing and dancing and then Ginger Rogers joins in on the storytelling. Not so with this one. He is part of the storytelling but the center of attention.

While the costumes are beautiful, not one of them stands out. There is nothing in their clothing that attracts attention despite each dressed differently from each other. No top hats, even suits, and definitely no gorgeous evening gown. Each compliments each other.

I've never seen this film, but from the clip it looks like these characters have a good relationship with each other. During the song they are having lots of fun playing around, entertaining each other as well as the audience. The gags are funny and so is the way they interact with each other during this time.

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1) These are four people in search of an audience. They are brainstorming ideas off of each other almost faster than the lyricist can write! This is the grown up version of Mickey and Judy's "Hey gang, let's put on a show!" They ooze sophistication while being very free in their own skin to do or say (or sing) whatever it takes. As Jeffery says there is no difference between Bill (sic) Shakespeare's verse and Bill Robinson's dancing feet and so it goes here. 

2) I think that three of the four are casually attired in that their clothes look like clothes and not costumes. Tony's suit, however, looks too tailored and formfitting to not be anything but a costume. It sets Fred Astaire apart from the group because he is not just the star of the motion picture but because he is "Fred Astaire" and people come to the movies expect to see a dapper Fred not a rumpled Fred.

3) I've always believed that Nanette Fabray tried to steal focus in this number. Yes, she is a capable performer but for my money it has always been Oscar Levant who walked off with whatever scene his was in. I could watch this number over and over because they are a fine ensemble that works so well together and you believe that they genuinely care for each other. 

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  1. They lean in to talk (sing) to each other. They are in close conversational proximity, as opposed to being on opposite sides of the stage or on stage & off stage, requiring a lot of movement and volume to communicate. They 4 of them are on stage together at all times, except for very short periods of time during the various gags in the number.
  2. Costuming color palette is very cohesive for the men - all in blues/purples and Nanette Fabray is in neutral colors = white & gray. Oscar Levant & Fred Astaire have ties in the same or almost the same color. Previous musicals would have had each performer in distinctive colors or distinctive styles to emphasize their individuality.
  3. The dance number is staged so that all performers do the same steps with the only variation being timing - such as the crossover leg steps of Fred, Nanette, and Jack. They also do the steps next to each other in a line within a very close camera frame - supporting the themes of togetherness and working together. They move as one. Also the "gags" within the number are throwbacks to old vaudeville sketches: 2 guys knocking off each other's hats (Abbot & Costello used this gag); the ladder w/Oscar at both ends (Laurel & Hardy gags and circus clown acts featured a ladder gag, usually with 1 guy swinging it around wildly and others having to duck or get out of the way with many near misses; the acrobatic "stack" with Nanette at the top holding up Fred & Jack - harkening back to the many acrobatic acts; the sneaking in & out of doors no knowing where the other person is (classic stage & movie blocking - a la the Keystone Cops among others).
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1. You can tell that this is a group of good friends, judging from the way they joke around with each other throughout the number. The performers are decidedly not dancers (apart from the obvious exception... Oscar Levant; the man was a fiend on the dance floor!), so they rely more on visual humor and comical interactions. The laid-back, fun-filled tone of the scene makes the song seem more like a after-hours get-together between coworkers, rather than a big, complex musical extravaganza. It's the backstage experience!

2. Visually, none of the performers are very striking. Everyone wears muted, neutral colors - dark blues, grays, and whites - meaning no one truly draws your eyes away from the rest. It causes the group to mesh together in a design sense; they are a team not only in a shared interest in the theatre, but fashion-wise, as well.

3. Again, there is a lot of fun and fancy-free in this scene - a bunch of theatre pals having a good time with an unattended set. They use props and backdrops to entertain each other, in a way reminiscent of the "Make 'em Laugh" number from Singin' in the Rain. Anyone who's been a high school theatre kid hanging out with other such folk will know that there's no better way to bond with each other than messing around with set pieces when the director's not looking. You can tell without even having seen the movie, just by watching these guys joking about with each other, that they are comrades in arms. Literally in arms, when they're doing the cheerleader pyramid routine.

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1. As you watch the interaction between the four characters in this scene, what do you notice about the way they include each other or relate to one another? How is it different from early musicals we have discussed?

Not only is the scene putting emphasizes on the themes of being community driven and offering inclusion, but it also points out the theme of the world-is-your-oyster mentality. The possibilities seem absolutely limitless and everything is viewed with a sense of positivity and endless enthusiasm. Which makes sense since World War II had finally ended and the Allied Powers won. I can see why people were so excited about the aspect of a glittering and bright future after everything seemed so bleak the decade before.

As we can see in the scene that's laid out, we watch as each of the characters interact with other in a seemingly warm and playful way. Each displaying their own set of little quips and sense of humorous interplay as the musical routine progresses. We also get to see the theme of unity being played out all throughout the scene as well. The way each character has a chance to showcase their own unique talents and have their moment to shine in the spotlight while still being able to work together in a cohesive unit is quite apparent. I feel like we don't get to see that a whole lot in some of the earlier films because most of the focus was on the performance element itself rather than the hull of the storyline. 

 

2. What do you notice about the costuming of the characters that indicate cohesiveness of the ensemble, as opposed to setting anyone apart? Be specific.

Even though, the costuming itself seems a little plain, the indication of cohesiveness lies within the coordination of the color scheme and the patterning itself. As we can see from the clip, the three male characters all have very well tailored jackets which are tied together with a complementary color scheme of both light and dark blues and a very neutral gray tone. Nanette Fabray's costume is also in the same neutral gray tone and is also very well fitted which is essentially the defining piece that ties everything together. The uniqueness of these seemingly plain clothes also puts an emphasis on the individuality of each character as well.  We can see that the characters have very distinct personalities despite their consistency as a cohesive unit and this is due to their costuming. For example, Nanette Fabray's costume is a nice, ordinary white blouse matched with a patterned gray and white skirt along with a single red flower essentially makes her character pop from the other three male characters. Although we can clearly see that she is the only women in the group, her costume still gives her a sense of an individual personality while still being apart of a unit. The same goes for Jack Buchanan's costume as well. In his case, we can see that he is wearing a light blue jacket with a gray ascot indicating that he is not only that he is a serious artist, but also some what pretentious. This being said, gives his character a sense of individualism that is quite unique and therefore makes him stand even more than Nanette Fabray's character, but is still enough to blend in with the rest of the group. All in all, the characters do have a chance to stand out as individuals, but only enough to be distinguished from each other and not from the group itself. 

 

3. What do you notice about the staging and interplay between the characters that helps define the relationships between the characters in the song?

In this clip, we get to see how each character works together to make the other better while still being put on equal footing. After all, the routine itself is reinforcing the idea of unity and harmony. We get to see this idea put to work by how the characters interact with one other in a very light and humorous tone as well as having a chance to demonstrate their talents as performers. For example, I believe this is best exhibited in both the acrobatic display and the old vaudevillian comedy routine. In the acrobatic routine, we see the characters help each other and work together to form a very impressive gymnastic display only to be thwarted by Levant stepping towards the front of the camera to reveal that it's just a cleverly planned illusion. We also get to see this same idea repeated in the clever use of illusion, pantomime and sight gags as displayed in the vaudevillian routine. Here, we watch as Fred Astaire and Jack Buchanan pantomime a slightly more satirical version of Laurel and Hardy while Oscar Levant passes by carrying a ladder, at both ends. We then see Nannette Fabray appear to demonstrate her own unique impression of Mae West as she attempts to impress Astaire and Buchanan with her hips. Regardless of all the hullabaloo that's being displayed in this specific routine, it still gives us this sense that despite the character's different backgrounds and talents, they're still able to come together as a cohesive unit to create something fabulous, remarkable, eye-catching, and overall, just plain fun.

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As you watch the interaction between the four characters in this scene, what do you notice about the way they include each other or relate to one another? How is it different from early musicals we have discussed?

They are all coming together as a group to unite in a show - theme for 1950s musicals. Earlier musicals were concerned with economic disparities, and war.  In the 50s, the economy was improving after the war, and people were able to live a good life.

What do you notice about the costuming of the characters that indicate cohesiveness of the ensemble, as opposed to setting anyone apart? Be specific.

They are unified in more of a dress casual ensemble with 50s dress style. Subdued coordinating colors in suits, and dress.

 

What do you notice about the staging and interplay between the characters that helps define the relationships between the characters in the song?

The delightful light dancing style, use of props, comedic gestures making for a light hearted energetic stagey feel for the audience.  At one point they joined together in a fan style resembling unification.  The world is a stage of entertainment - "The American Way" theme.

 

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     Right off in costumes you see a difference, Fred is in a striped suit, good for a businessman, but the others are much more casual.  Fabray in  simple skirt and blouse, Levant in a light sports coat and dark pants and Buchanan in even more casual wear even with a cravat.  They are the ones in unison working to get the individualistic Fred to understand and to change and join them in getting on the Bandwagon.

     This is different from post-war On The Town, where Kelly knowing that the others in the movie couldn't do the ballet, replaces them with real dancers and only he and Vera Ellen do the ballet.  Here Fred either steps out, or overtly simplifies his dance, to fit in with the others.

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As you watch the interaction between the four characters in this scene, what do you notice about the way they include each other or relate to one another? How is it different from early musicals we have discussed?

They remind me of the Four Musketeers, I know that’s a bit corny, but all for one and one for all is the theme of this scene. A pep rally for Astaire to come aboard, then a little song and dance to set the mood of knowing they are going “all in” for the next musical show. The clip gives the audience a knowledge even if it’s been done before they can make it bigger and better, also, broadening the material to include new acts. They commit and the audience knows they are in for a delightful afternoon at the movies. 

What do you notice about the costuming of the characters that indicate cohesiveness of the ensemble, as opposed to setting anyone apart? Be specific.

Blended well together. They match each other from ties to socks, while the dress is neutral and sets the tone, with a very beautiful red flower that pops. All together you have unity and flow. 

What do you notice about the staging and interplay between the characters that helps define the relationships between the characters in the song? 

I haven’t seen this movie so the clip shows a a definite band wagon amongst colleagues and friends. Lots of cheer, memories, good times. Being there for one another. 

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Musicals of the thirties, and to a lesser extent, the forties, usually had a lead singer and/or dancer in each number, this musical, and this song in particular, features four singers and dancers (except Levant).  They are wearing the casual attire of the time, although Astaire is more formal in his suit . They look as if they came from the street and got involved in a song and dance.  None of them is clothed in any special outfit.  Nobody stands out and each has a portion of the song.  Mutual appreciation of "show business" is the topic that is shared and agreed upon by all. 

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This clip kinda made me sad to watch Fred just sitting in a chair for a lot of it and not dancing. While the early musicals we discussed tended to focus on a lead like Fred who showed off his dancing skill with all sorts of fancy tricks, this clip barely had any dancing and the dancing that it did have was performed by all four characters in unison, and it was all basic tap - time steps and such.

The costumes are drab and just look like every day clothes - nothing fashion. Definitely emphasized conformity and blending in.

The actors dance together with no standout performances - there are no stars here.

 

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  1. As you watch the interaction between the four characters in this scene, what do you notice about the way they include each other or relate to one another? How is it different from early musicals we have discussed?  

There is a generosity between performers in this scene.  Each is equally showcased individually, but it is far better when they work together.  Levant is a bit of the odd man out, as he does not dance, but all is redeemed with the ladder bit. They use some of the old time slapstick, but it feels fresh.

There is no lead, this is an ensemble piece, sans chorus.  

  1. What do you notice about the costuming of the characters that indicate cohesiveness of the ensemble, as opposed to setting anyone apart? Be specific.

Minnelli is a man who know how to create costumes.  The color pallet is clean, crisp using cool tones, (Fabray get that feminine touch of red, you know, ever so popular), against a highly stagy dramatic set set.  The thing that I always notice in this scene is how Buchanan is set slightly apart, via accent, presence (he is tall), but how Minnelli dresses him as an English county gentleman, complete with ascot.

  1. What do you notice about the staging and interplay between the characters that helps define the relationships between the characters in the song?

Minnelli is the master of mis-en-scene. Technology was advancing in this era of Hollywood cinema.  Minnelli create a feeling of intimacy and comradery that grows between the performers as the song progresses.  We see the transition Astaire makes as he buys into the idea. But, by far the best aspect of this scene is how playful, and hopeful it is.

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1.  As you watch the interaction between the four characters in this scene, what do you notice about the way they include each other or relate to one another?

It's a musical version of what I imagined a sketch writing session for Sid Caesar's Show of Show's would've been like, where they sat around brain-storming, conjuring up ideas and scenes.  (As a matter of fact Nanette Fabray replaced Sid's co-star Imogene Coca when she left to launch her own show.)  In the song everyone pitches lines as to what the show could be about while trying to convince Tony (Fred) to jump on the bandwagon.  Tony ultimately contributes: "It could be Oedipus Rex." ironically this is not a suggestion of, the Shakespearean actor/director, Jeffrey.  And while each one has their own thoughts, they are willing to listen to the others as they are working towards a common goal.

How is it different from early musicals we have discussed?  It may differ from the "boy meets girls" musicals where the plot revolved primarily around just two characters, Chevalier and MacDonald, Eddy and MacDonald, Kelly and Garland; however it is not so very different from the Mickey and Judy "Let's put on a show" musicals or Footlight Parade and 42nd Street where everyone pools their talents and works together to entertain the audience.

2.  What do you notice about the costuming of the characters that indicate cohesiveness of the ensemble, as opposed to setting anyone apart? Be specific.

The funny thing is I noticed that Jeffrey is dressed more casually than Tony and Lester, who are in suit and tie, which does seem to set him apart (but I didn't look upon his individualism with suspicion).  Nevertheless, the color of his jacket compliments the colors of their suits.  Additionally the married couple, Lily and Lester Marton, are attired in similar shades of gray; as a result the eye is not drawn to anyone in particular.

 
3.  What do you notice about the staging and interplay between the characters that helps define the relationships between the characters in the song?  When someone is doing a solo bit it is not executed in a way that upstages, it merely serves to demonstrate: This is  Entertainment!  And even if Jeffrey is the flamboyant (read hammy) soon to be director he is not directing the number, nor is he taking center stage.  While Tony may have been dubious he has now jumped onboard and is performing silly vaudevillian schtick alongside his cohorts.  Then all four join together to perform like a circus family and form a mock pyramid, uttering in unison things like, "Hup...hup!---Allay!  Hey, Here We Go!"  Further illustrating the spirit of "community and cooperation".

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  1. As you watch the interaction between the four characters in this scene, what do you notice about the way they include each other or relate to one another? How is it different from early musicals we have discussed?

This routine kind of brings to mind for me Mickey Rooney and Judy Garlands, lets put on a show musicals.  They have an idea and they need to sell it to someone to carry it out.  In this case Astaire is who they have to convince to join them.  They put him front and center so that they have his full attention as they begin their pitch.  As he is convinced to joint them it becomes enthusiastic and exciting.  The tempo changes and they begin to play off of one another and build on ideas as to where it could go.  At that point they have become a team and are working together for a common goal.  No one is a stand out as leader they all are equals and relate to one another that way.   

  1. What do you notice about the costuming of the characters that indicate cohesiveness of the ensemble, as opposed to setting anyone apart? Be specific.

They are all well dressed, but not extremely formally.  Maybe a tad overdressed for the setting.  To me,  Nanette Fabray and Oscar Levant's costumes colors compliment one another and lend to the idea that they are the couple in this quartet.  Her red flower at her waist gives her a pop of color and a feminine touch what could other wise be a rather drab dress.  Jack Buchanan's costume seem to be what would at some point become a rather stereotypical style of a movie depiction of a director.  

  1. What do you notice about the staging and interplay between the characters that helps define the relationships between the characters in the song?

Everyone seems to play to their strengths without anyone being the "star" of the piece.  Levant bows out of the dance portions of the number by simply walking out of the camera site only to return and being with him some piece of comic business (IE: the ladder or the handkerchief, stepping out of the pyramid to show that it was really and illusion).  The things on the set seem to become members of the group as they find things to play with (again the ladder, the handkerchief, the pyramid, the hallway set, the hats etc.)  

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I really liked this clip.  Fred Astaire--let's face it--is clearly the "biggest name" of the quartet, yet here he isn't highlighted and focused upon.  He's part of the quartet, and willingly so, and there are times within the performance where you almost forget he's there because the focus is on Nanette, or on Oscar, or on Jack.  And that's exactly the point.  Everyone gets their time to shine in this scene.  The four of them are even shifting left-to-right location throughout.

The staging here is outstanding, allowing for some classic visual gags as well as the removal of the wall/door showing what we expect will just have Oscar back there, but in fact has everyone.  Nice trickery.

Unlike past musicals, cohesiveness and conformity get more focus in this decade.  In this clip, it's good.  In other musicals.....eh, not so much.  There are certainly a number of 1950's musicals I am not a fan of.  Hopefully the Daily Doses won't cover any of those!

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They are performing together as friends, not as lovers or a stage act.  No one person is more important than another, they are equally important as the scene goes on.

What I noticed about the costuming is that they are color coordinated, showing that no one is more important or a lead in the scene.

You can tell that the performers in this clip are friends wanting to help each other get the show started.  

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The characters each have a segment of the song where they are featured and it seamlessly moves back and forth with different pairings and then returning to the full ensemble.

The men all have a shade of purple in their costumes linking them together while Fabray is in black and white with a splash of red. Also it spans from all dark with Astaire to color and dark with Tony then grey and dark with Oscar to black and white with Fabray.

Oscar and Tony do broad comedy. Astaire, Fabray and Tony do the dances. The whole group does the easier group steps. There is a sense of fun and comraderie in all they do.

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I really enjoyed this clip of a movie I have not seen but look forward to it.  The characters really played off of each other very well highlighting the ensemble aspect of the movie.  In this scene, they are a true ensemble where each take equal part in the song and dance. It's full of comic timing and sight gags and each of them is included.  I also loved the way the end of the song incorporated "The American Way" which emphasizes the theme of the  1950s and American prominence.  Can't wait to see the entire film.

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As you watch the interaction between the four characters in this scene, what do you notice about the way they include each other or relate to one another? How is it different from early musicals we have discussed?

Each character is given a verse to sing until they convince Fred to join them. The momentum builds as they display all forms of entertainment. I think it differs from other musicals because they start off by interacting with each other and then they include the audience in on their number.

What do you notice about the costuming of the characters that indicate cohesiveness of the ensemble, as opposed to setting anyone apart? Be specific.

The costumes reflect the personality of each character. Nanette’s charcter is bright and happy. She has on the colorful skirt with the flouncy petticoats. You can tell Jack is a little stuffy and full of himself with his tweed jacket and scarf around his neck. Oscar is a litle sloppy. His clothes are loose fitted and a little sloppy. And of course Fred is dapper as ever.

What do you notice about the staging and interplay between the characters that helps define the relationships between the characters in the song?

The way it was staged you can tell that Buchanan and Astaire are equal in talent. Nanette’s character is playful. They include Oscar when he can keep up. He is really the comic relief. The movement is seamless as they move from one verse to another. I love when Oscar is at the beginning and at the end of the moving ladder. Also the scene when Oscar lights the cigarette and goes through the door. Then the scenery moves and they continue the song. The comic bits and singing just flows. It’s one of the best numbers ever filmed. I love the way they tie the whole movie together when they reprise the song at the end of the movie!

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In the opening scene, the others rush to help Jeffrey up from the floor, and as he gets to his feet, he starts pitching his big idea for Tony’s comeback.  The Martons are very interested, and they and Jeffrey walk Tony, the once “king” of song and dance men, to the throne where they will continue the pitch.  The song is perfect for this routine as it works very much like a conversation.  Each of the actors is listening to the others’ ideas, and responds with their lyric in a very natural and animated way.  You can see their excitement grow as Tony actually begins to show interest in the prospect of a comeback, even adding his own ideas to the mix.  The music is the loudest as Tony, Lily, and Jeffrey exuberantly dance in front of the “Quiet” sign in the background.  As the clip continues, we see the “birth” of a new show, with the actors beaming with pride over their “child”. 

The acrobatic scene is a reflection of the new show they are building, as they each have a part to play in the formation and in the show itself.  I’m a huge Oscar Levant fan and this was his last film.  I loved his acerbic wit, and enjoyed watching him “break away” from the human pyramid as he sang the lyric “that’s entertainment”.  He starts the ladder bit by saying “look what I can do”, and he ends up on the other end saying “still me”.  He continues this streak by being the phantom who lights Jeffrey’s cigarette. The group’s idea for a show is so good that they celebrate their happiness by breaking out into comedic silent film routines. 

As to costumes, Tony is the most formally dressed in a dark suit, as befits his previous glory days. The writing team, the Martons, are smartly, but more casually dressed in neutral colors, with Lily being very feminine.  In fact, the rectangle designs on her skirt remind me of sheets of paper.  And Jeffrey, who came up with the new idea, is more relaxed in attire with his cravat and light blue belted jacket.  The only other pop of color in the clothing is the red flower in Lily’s belt.

The final dance scene in this clip shows Fred Astaire’s professionalism.  As they approach the steps, everyone glances down at one time or another to see where they are, particularly Oscar Levant.  But not Fred.  He knows the floor he’s dancing on and it’s imprinted in his mind and feet.  He doesn’t need to look to acclimate himself.

 

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Daily Dose #9:

1) In this number, you see how the characters relate to each other based on how the scene is set up. It starts with the actors singing to Astaire to convince him of their idea and then once he is sold, they all sing together.  Each character gets a moment to shine.  I don't recall singing this as much in older musicals.

2) I feel the costuming is very attune to the gender norms of the period. The men where suits and hats. The sole woman is wearing a skirt and walks around in feminine poses.

3) I li9ke how the staging of the song helps them first sing individually and then come together once they are all on the same page. They each show their strengths but no one is bigger than the other.  

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Although I have seen this number many times, I did not focus on how seamlessly they work together until now. That is the mark of a good craftsman when the details blend so well.  Although the clothing is different for each character, there is a cohesiveness about them that doesn’t draw attention to the fact that they are all different. Costuming is sometimes the attention-getter, but not here.  Muted colors and collared necklines are used on “regular” clothes to add to the working roles of each character—the flamboyant director, the dapper star, and the married composer pitch team.  The characters work together with an interaction-response round robin.  I love how Oscar Levantine is worked into the dance and comedy of the number. On one level you are aware is he not the hoofer the others are so that is why he is not with them, but his comedy bits work so well that they seem to be a natural reason he is not.  

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What I first noticed from this clip was the coordination of the costumes, as well as a certain drabness in them in terms of colors, such that no one's outfit truly stands out.  Most have on something with the color grey and the men all have navy blue.  A genuine sense of "uniformity" is created.  Even the female actor, Nanette Fabray, is clothed in grey and white:  nothing flashy as you would normally see in the highly decorative costume designs of the 40s musicals.  You also notice the ensemble working together like a well-oiled, well-ordered, machine.  At one point in the dance sequence when Oscar Levant is carrying the ladder and the others appear in front as the ladder is moving, it reminds me of a train, going about its business, with all the ensemble members working in a timely and orderly fashion to complete their tasks. Each character has his or her task/movement to complete but it is in the cooperative, collaborative team effort that things are best accomplishment, as the lyrics, as well as the music and movement attest.  

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Band Wagon is certainly not a "stand and sing..move over here and stand and sing again" musical! The interplay of the characters; especially in the That's Entertainment number shows collaboration and friendship. They see truly to be listening to one another and not pulling focus away when one takes the lead. The costumes are cohesive without being similar. The color palette flows well between each character and the set. You can tell easily in this number that this group interacts regularly and are friends!

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As you watch the interaction between the four characters in this scene, what do you notice about the way they include each other or relate to one another? How is it different from early musicals we have discussed?

The curator's note states this clearly--illustrated in this number is four individuals as an ensemble where not one of them is featured in a particular strength, but all are equal and playing together. It is a cooperative effort. That is the spirit of the song, the movie, and the title.  

Earlier musicals often highlighted a particular vocalist/dancer.  We only see Judy Garland interacting acting with co-stars but she is the focal point of the scene.  Here no actor/dancer/vocalist plays over the other. 

What do you notice about the costuming of the characters that indicate cohesiveness of the ensemble, as opposed to setting anyone apart? Be specific

As I was watching the clip the first thing I notices was the color palate.  Men wearing blue, black, and white.  Each character has these same colors, yet depicting different parts of life.  A smoking jacket, a pinstripe suit, a gray sport jacket.  Female artist- black and white.  But contains a red flower. A sign of femininity? A backdrop of red.  What does this mean?  Any guesses? Equality- "the world is a stage, the stage is the world."  The movie goer is entertained with entertainment of equal value. 

What do you notice about the staging and interplay between the characters that helps define the relationships between the characters in the song? 

The team proceeds to goof around with set pieces singing about various scenarios that indicate, “the world is a stage, the stage is a world of entertainment.”  As a team, they convince each other that with group cooperation, sticking with a common mission, they can accomplish anything. 

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1. Everybody is in sync with one another. Their steps are related to one another and they are based on what the others are doing. They are also helping each other with the dancing and even the stunts. This is different from other musicals because the dancers in The Band Wagon are working together and their dance routine is based on everybody not just one person. You need all four people for the dance routine to work not just one or two but four. 

2. Even the costumes are similar. The colours are the same. You have two people wear a suit and tie and the other two wear a mismatched outfit but it still works out and they end up matching one another. 

3. The stage is a also a big part of their dance routine. 

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