Dr. Vanessa Theme Ament

DAILY DOSE OF DELIGHT #10 (From CALAMITY JANE)

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1.  As you reflect upon female representation in the 1950s, where do you think this film character falls in the continuum?

This character is the far opposite of what was being represented. She is the "Tomboy". Jane can do anything a man can do and she feels she can do it better. The way she speaks, incomplete sentences-slang. Very unkept and always wearing pants. Jane needed to do her part to help out everyone no matter what was needed. If it meant getting dirty, that it was she did. Women, had there place, it was in the home cooking and cleaning and Jane was not having that. 

2.  How do you think Doris Day grows as an actress in her various roles in the 1950s, before and after this musical?

Roles before and after, were very feminine roles. As a professional woman, she plays an ad exec in "Pillow Talk". Doing the opposite, she is a dutiful wife in "Send Me No Flowers"

3.  Does Doris Day’s bright and sunny persona add or detract from the role of Calamity Jane in your opinion? Please defend your answer.

As the versatile actress she is, seeing her play someone who is so gruff and high spirited was inspirational. I liked how she went all in for Calamity Jane, sometimes a little exaggerated. But you would need to know, what it was like to really be in a man's world and still not be taken seriously by some.

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Doris Day and Betty Hutton both make me cringe -- at least, in these particular films.  I can't sit through either one, can't even watch the snippets.  I much prefer the contrast of Marilyn Monroe and Jane Russell, and I thought they both provide a better, more complete perspective on women in the post-war era.  Marilyn Monroe is gorgeous beyond words and not as naive as she seems.  In Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, she knows what she wants and she knows how to manipulate the opposite sex in order to get it.  Jane Russell is beautiful, intelligent, poised, strong. Both were role models that women of the era aspired to.  I don't think anyone wanted to be just like Calamity Jane, but every woman alive wished she could be Marliyn Monroe.  

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Daily Dose #10 

1. As you reflect upon female representation in the 1950s, where do you think this film character falls in the continuum? Why?

Calamity Jane shows Day as an independent woman who suddenly realizes she needs a man in her life and then proceeds to soften her look and attitude.  I can't help feel that this reflection is a result of the Post War, where many women were doing a man's job before the war ended, and then were expected to go back and be good wives and mothers.

2. How do you think Doris Day grows as an actress in her various roles in the 1950s, before and after this musical?

She was mainly known for her musical talent rather than acting, but just two years later she starred as Ruth Etting in "Love Me or Leave Me", giving a great performance of both acting and singing, followed the year after that working for Alfred Hitchcock's remake of his own film "The Man who knew too much" almost a pure dramatic performing save for one obscure song  - que something something.  These later films allowed her to transition to both drama and comedy films (such as the Rock Hudson films she starred) in the 1960's and not so many musical roles.

3. Does Doris Day’s bright and sunny persona add or detract from the role of Calamity Jane in your opinion? Please defend your answer.

Given the film is a musical, I think it adds. Being bright and sunny at the start reflects the characters confidence, allowing her to tone it down a bit when she needs to range emotions, such as in the "Secret Love" sequence.

 

 

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1) By far, Doris Day was ahead of the curve in her portrayal of Calamity Jane. Jane is a stagecoach guard, which is most definitely--even by today's standards--is usually considered a man's job. Jane retains her independent streak which indeed does define who she is. This is not a trait associated with women of the 1950's.

2) Doris Day most definitely grew as an actress. Her portrayal of Ruth Etting in "Love Me or Leave Me" (1955) should have garnered her an Oscar nomination; her performance in "Teacher's Pet (1958) did see her receive an Oscar nomination. Doris Day played the personification of a character that filmgoers know as "Doris Day" and while she might not have fared well in a Shakespearean play, she was always the best at giving us the girl next door who always rose to the occasion...something very few actors can accomplish.

3) If the producers had wanted a sexy Calamity Jane they would have gone with Marilyn Monroe; a sultry Calamity Jane would have been Ava Gardner, a plucky CJ would have been Shirley MacLaine and an ice cool CJ might have been Grace Kelly. The producer(s) of Calamity Jane wanted a bright and sunny actress to go with their bright and sunny production and in the 1950's no actress was sunnier than our beloved Doris Day. Warner Bros. picked the right actress for their production.

   Now was this a historically accurate portrayal? No, not from all that I have read about CJ, but then again a musical isn't supposed to be a documentary. I didn't come away learning more about CJ nor was I yelling at the screen about historical inaccuracies. I believe that Calamity Jane is a fine Doris Day musical.

   I can live with that.

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1. As you reflect upon female representation in the 1950s, where do you think this film character falls in the continuum? Why?

Well, depending on the fact that we see female representation in most films during the 50s portrayed as being mostly feminine and glamorous, I believe that the character of Calamity Jane and Doris Day's portrayal of her is a nice contrast. Mostly because it's a good depiction of what women could really do in terms of being strong and hardworking especially during this time. In the first clip, we see Jane as stage coach scout who protects the stage from being attacked by Indians and wild animals while crossing the dessert. During the course of clip, we also get to see that she actually enjoys her job, not only because she's trying to be tough like a man, but also because the job gives her a sense of importance since both the driver and the passengers depend on her to get them safely to the next town. Here, we see that she's truly in her element and how comfortable she is in her own skin despite the fact that the men in town don't take her seriously. In the next clip, we observe her exploring her feminine side as she realizes that she was in love with her rival instead of the person that she thought she was in love with. Personally, I think this gives a very interesting duality. Not only does she exude confidence and contentment in being "one of the guys", but we also see her display a more gentler side of her nature as well all while struggling to be seen as an equal in the wild west. I believe this is a rare gem in of itself simply because it's a nice representation of a strong, confident women in the 1950s and that what sets it apart from most films that were made during this era.

2. How do you think Doris Day grows as an actress in her various roles in the 1950s, before and after this musical?

Doris Day was always phenomenal in every role she played and she had quite an impressive range. From light comedy to more dramatic roles, she proved that not only could she be the everyday women that was relatable, but also be the confident, sassy women that could hold her own, even with men. Sure, some of her roles seem a little too wholesome and overly optimistic at times, but that's what made her so charming and attractive as an actress. Her portrayal as the main character in Calamity Jane is a great example of all of this. Here, we see her playing a very strong, self-reliant young woman who also has sensitive side as well. We also get a chance to see her showcase and really develop her talents as a performer as well. How she branches out from a slightly demure and somewhat bubbly singer to a full blown artist is truly spectacular and also sets the tone the types of characters she played later on in her career. 

3. Does Doris Day’s bright and sunny persona add or detract from the role of Calamity Jane in your opinion? Please defend your answer.

Honestly, I believe bright and sunny persona adds to the charm of the character itself. It provides more of a balance to rougher edges of the character. It shows that despite the fact that Calamity Jane is a rough-and-tumble kind of gal, her over-whelming optimism is what drives her to keep going and pursue her goals even in the face of adversity. It also adds a sense of sweetness and believability that really makes her a bit more relatable in some aspects. 

 

 

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1. As you reflect upon female representation in the 1950s, where do you think this film character falls in the continuum? Why?

Calamity Jane is serving for the female representation of American women as an example for women coming out of their strong, independent roles within society during the wartime era to once again, begin assuming the more traditional feminine roles of women prewar. It’s a reminder or reintroduction of the days of the more feminine American woman.

2. How do you think Doris Day grows as an actress in her various roles in the 1950s, before and after this musical?

I think Doris Day grew as an actress because of the roles she was cast in to move from obscurity to being revered as one of the country’s leading ladies having to juggle the demands of such roles in connection to the direction of the nation at the time. The country needed someone to fulfill the role of the American woman from wartime to community and confidence. Her capacity as an actress grew with that demand.

3. Does Doris Day’s bright and sunny persona add or detract from the role of Calamity Jane in your opinion? Please defend your answer.

I believe that her bright persona detracts from the role of Calamity Jane. The character arc doesn’t seem fully explored or ‘fleshed-out’ with her as Calamity. I feel that the music and song might’ve even had more of an impact with someone with less of an approachable persona. That’s the job of the hair/makeup/wardrobe/actor to undertake. Instead, I feel that they tried to get a plug and play audience likability for Calamity.

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As you reflect upon female representation in the 1950s, where do you think this film character falls in the continuum? Why?

I think this role is a transition between the 1940s woman who was strong, capable, and independent, and the idle 1950s woman, feminine, demure, and traditional.

How do you think Doris Day grows as an actress in her various roles in the 1950s, before and after this musical?

I think her roles become more complex, less cookie cutter.  She gets to play more than just the girl next door, branching out into roles that include a woman caught up in the intrigue of an assassination plot, and a wife fleeing an abusive relationship.  She displays a fantastic range as an actress and singer.

Does Doris Day’s bright and sunny persona add or detract from the role of Calamity Jane in your opinion? Please defend your answer.

I think it helps make Calamity more relatable.  Even a hard nosed gun toting scout, can be a happy person.  It goes back to her song on the stage coach about her joy at being able to help those she cared for.  Not something an unsmiling morose person would do. 

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I have decided to take Dr. Ament up on her offer to "feel free to come up with your own" discussion starters, so here goes:

I’ve always had a problem with the exaggerated mannerisms of the movie tomboy.  Betty Hutton’s Annie, Doris Day’s Calam, Debbie Reynolds’ Molly Brown, make me cringe.   It’s as if the director and actress felt it wouldn’t be entertaining enough unless facial expressions and gestures were so broad it verged on hammy.  As much as I liked Betty Hutton (“I Wish I Didn’t Love You So” from The Perils of Pauline is one of my favorite songs ) I couldn’t stand her mugging.  (And I know it’s terrible of me to say, but I’m one who could watch Lucy but I never loved her for the same reason.)  I almost feel embarrassed for them as they’re made to look foolish for the sake of a laugh, and the characters seemed false.  Then when they become more refined and lady-like it’s so much on the opposite end of the spectrum it again doesn’t ring true.  Obviously I don’t share the opinion that’s expressed in the Curator’s Notes as while I have seen Calamity Jane several times I think if I were to view the two clips without knowing what has happened in between those two songs I’d have to say, as beautiful as Day sings and looks in the “Secret Love” number it’s such a drastic change from the “Deadwood Stage” and “I Can Do Without You” number I wouldn’t consider she’s achieved a balance as she appears to be a completely different character, albeit she is still wearing pants.
There's no denying Day’s sunny “All American Girl Next Door” personae was popular with audiences, and I enjoyed the nostalgic trips down memory lane teamings with Gordon MacRae; On Moonlight Bay and By the Light of the Silvery Moon.  And in viewing her non-musical performances you can see she was capable of giving an understated and entertaining performance as in Young Man with a Horn and Young At Heart, but all too often I found myself thinking I would have enjoyed watching her even more if she’d been a bit more restrained.
  

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12 hours ago, mariaki said:

s it just me, or does this poster look like a pulp novel cover?

I never heard anyone say that about this poster but I think you are right. Subliminal salaciousness? Hmmmm

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1. Calamity Jane's character falls into the continuum where the "tomboy" tries to fit in with the guys. She is a strong "tomboyish" character where in 1950's musicals there were more ladylike characters. 

2. Doris Day grows by being more recognised by her acting and singing to be asked and chosen to be in more roles. She gets more confident and grows with her comedic acting. 

3. Her bright and sunny persona adds to the role of Calamity Jane because she is a "tomboy" trying to fit in, but underneath is a sweet innocent female. 

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Although Doris Day was very good as Calamity Jane, I always thought she was an odd choice for the role. In my humble opinion, I think Betty Garrett would have been better--someone who had already played strong female roles (Take Me out to the Ball Game, On the Town). Doris had the reputation of being very "girly," so I have a hard time believing her as a tomboy.

However, Doris does a good job portraying Calamity Jane, and you certainly can't fault her voice in the musical numbers. She more than keeps up with Howard Keel. At times, though, her acting seems a bit frenetic, as if she's really having to dig deep to portray a woman who's trying to be part of a man's world. The scene where she tries to wear a dress is just painful. I feel so bad for the character because you know before she starts that she's going to fail at trying to fit the stereotype of a woman. She's not that type of woman; she's her own type. In this sense, the movie shows that women can fill more than one role in life--something quite different that society in the 1950s told us. I find this idea refreshing.

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1.  I feel like Doris Day strikes a happy medium between masculine and feminine energy.  The character of Calamity Jane also reminds me a lot of the character of Annie from Annie Get Your Gun.  They are both rough around the edges types of gals, but they still have femininity.  They are not portrayed as sexually as an ultra femme character like Marilyn Monroe plays.  Oftentimes the men in their lives don't recognize them as sexual people for part of the plot.  I can relate a lot to this character as I feel I am in the middle of that spectrum between femininity and masculinity.  I have never been ultra femme or interested in frills, etc.

2. I feel like Doris Day does show growth as an actress, but she does also have the tendency to be type cast as either the tomboyish girl or the girl next door.  She is very much not very sexualized as a character.  She tends to play the wholesome types.  

3.  I don't think her sunny personality deters from the character.  As a kid I was a fan of Doris Day movies and could relate to her a lot as I have the tendency to be the sunny cheery personality.  Though I am no longer as wholesome as Doris Day. ;) lol 

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  1. As you reflect upon female representation in the 1950s, where do you think this film character falls in the continuum? Why?
    Well, I think that it is hard to keep churning out the female roles that the 50's thought were necessary.  I haven't seen the film yet, but reading the notes it states that Jane/Day donned a dress and tried to be more feminine - I wonder if that was the message that this film was trying to get to girls in that era - to be feminine to get a husband?  But then she tames it down and still wears pants but it just more polished as her character grows in the movie.  I have to admit that I like the end result and I am proud that her character was able to keep to the ideals that she had in the beginning, but was still able to grow and think as a character.  I'd like to think that there were still people in the 50's that wanted to continue to see women become equals and therefore was able to inject this movie into that female continuum.
  2. How do you think Doris Day grows as an actress in her various roles in the 1950s, before and after this musical?
    I love Doris Day - her voice is happy and sweet and she is always lovely.  I love her in The Man Who Knew Too Much, and in By the Light of the Silvery Moon - she always seems to embody someone who knew her own mind and was able to be a woman who wasn't too girly.  In Silvery Moon, she works on her father's car and surprises her boyfriend who was in the war; in MWKTM, despite being given tranqs by her doctor husband, she keeps her cool and sings her son out of his kidnapping - she is smart and knows things are not right about the people that they come into contact with.  
  3. Does Doris Day’s bright and sunny persona add or detract from the role of Calamity Jane in your opinion? Please defend your answer.
    I think, like I said above, that it adds to the character.  I enjoy her sunny personality and I think that it shows that she doesn't take herself too seriously and can hold herself in a situation.  I enjoy that after she falls at the bar, she hops back up and gets her drink; she doesn't run away in tears like some other girl may have done.  

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1. It’s definitely different compared to most female representation in the past, especially in the first clip, even though you can sense an awkwardness towards the end in that she is still not entirely seen as an equal to the men.

2. Unfortunately, I’m not too familiar with Day’s later work. I’ve been meaning to check out more and hopefully will sometime soon.

3. I personally think it adds to the role in that it makes her more emotional which I think is more relatable, though I can also see people thinking that it detracts since it’s probably not accurate to the real Calamity Jane.

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I adore Doris Day, but I also loved Betty Hutton’s performance (and she’s originally from Battle Creek, about 12 miles from where I grew up. 

I don’t have much to add to the other comments, other than to say Miss Day’s best acting was in Love me or Leave Me, by far. And I’m not crazy about the film Calamity Jane, itself, but I LOVE her in the movie, and Secret Love is probably my favorite song among many favorites that she has sung. 

Another movie I really like is Young at Heart (1954), which I wish would be on television more often. I ended having to hunt down a copy of the movie, so I have it to watch whenever I want. The movie is based on an earlier film called Four Daughters, and the ending has been changed from the original. But it’s still a guilty pleasure of mine, mainly because of the combined singing talents of Miss Day and Frank Sinatra. By the way, I’ve looked and looked, and the duet they perform at the end (You, My Love) is nowhere to be found, except for on YouTube. Here it is:

 

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1. She is different because she is not as feminine as other girls during this time. She wears pants, makes her own choices, and does not let men tell her who she is.

2. She can play many roles and can do a variety of singing and dancing.

3. I believe it adds to her persona because if though she is more of a tomboy she is bright and cheerful, which helps builds her character.

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1) Watching these two clips from Calamity Jane destroy and later emphasize femininity in the 1950s was very different to other female roles that were created at the time. Although Jane is very tomboyish we get to see her tone down her roughness and manliness a little bit from one clip to the other. The 1950s were all about making females soft and feminine, and making men manly not just based on society rules but because of nature. The second clip tells us that even though a woman might act a lot like a man because of her way of dress, actions and personality there is no doubt that she is still a woman not just physically but naturally. The second clip proved to American audiences that if a woman was falling far from her gender role we can still see that they are warm, sweet, and loving underneath their rough persona, because after all they have a tender and loving nature that defines all women.

2) I have been a fan of Doris Day for a couple of years now. Her sweet smile and charisma reflect in the movie roles I have watched her star in. Based on the films I have seen with her in appearance, I have noticed that after the 1953 Calamity Jane role she starred in more feminine roles like Young at Heart (1955), Pillow Talk (1959), and Send Me No Flowers (1965). From these later films she played a daughter with a failed love life, a bachelorette and a wife. Prior to Calamity Jane she played the very feminine singer who was a single mother in My Dream is Yours (1949). After doing some research I found out Doris Day had another tomboy role who reached into her femininity to attract her suitor. That role was in the 1951 film On Moonlight Bay. She grows as an actress after Calamity Jane because she is able to take on more serious characters that reflected real-life situations of women in the 1950s. She was able to portray what many women wanted, which was to fall in love and be loved. Of course, we still get to see her lovely smile and charisma added to the characters she became in films.

3) In my opinion, Doris Day's cheerful persona adds to the role of Calamity Jane. Although the character sticks to her guns about her rough appearance and personality, Day's funny and bright trait gives Jane a not-so-tough and rugged look. It adds more depth to the character because it provides a sense of humor and positivity. Also, it adds to Jane's optimism and to her ability to soften the look and character when jane realizes she is in love with Bill Hickok.

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  1. Calamity Jane falls into the tomboy who can be coaxed into a young woman continuum of the 1950's mindset. She wore pants and was rough and tumble and could hang with the boys so to speak. Then when she realized she might have a more serious love interest than Danny (first crush),  she starts the metamorphosis to the 1950s woman of dresses, petticoats, and pearls. 
  2. I have not seen many Doris Day films so I can not say much about her body of work.
  3. It is about context. It is a musical so bright and sunny is always possible. You do have to suspend your knowledge of women at the time. Although I am sure there may have been bright and sunny personas during the time of Calamity Jane, historians do not paint her as being such a person. The records show she was out on her own and most likely working as a laundress and a camp follower which was a hard existence for women She was also reputed to be a heavy drinker which was not uncommon for the time and her purported station. Her drinking led to antics which led to performing. She died relatively young most likely from the effects of alcohol. Hardly the shiny biopic we see in this version of her life. 

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As you reflect upon female representation in the 1950s, where do you think this film character falls in the continuum? Why?  Doris is not the traditional sort of gal in this film character.  She does however, follow the great musical arrangements that she sings so beautifully. Doris Day is wholesome but not feminine, and her character is being like the guys naturally without really trying.

How do you think Doris Day grows as an actress in her various roles in the 1950s, before and after this musical? Doris Day is naturally talented in singing and dancing. She progresses into more films with comedy and romance as well as more serious roles.  She is feminine and has that natural persona that works well with other performances.

Does Doris Day’s bright and sunny persona add or detract from the role of Calamity Jane in your opinion? Please defend your answer.  She definitely has that persona that suits her in this role.  She carries the comedic performance quite naturally, and her singing works well with the story.

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As I was rewatching the Calamity Jane scenes something struck and I am wondering if anyone else has any thoughts on the subject. The Jane's character matures and we see her become more refined and softer and even her speech or vocabulary improves. This transformation reminded of the character of Eliza Doolittle in My Fair Lady. Granted Jane's was not as remarkable OR as drastic as Eliza but I would like some other opinions?

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1.      Calamity Jane definitely fits into the Tomboy or Street-Smart female role. Because the story takes place in the frontier, she has an added wild, tomboy, frontier and physical presence to her character.  She is not timid, constantly fighting to be one of the guys in all things. They accept her in some pieces, but not the same type of respect. I have always enjoyed this movie, being a tomboy in real life. I identified with Calamity Jane and felt a kinship as a young girl. (still do) Calamity gets things done and isn’t afraid to be herself. However, being a more feminine version is very different for her. I really like how she finds her own type of femininity by the end.  I thought that was pretty progressive.

2.      I have always enjoyed Doris Day due to her more “one of the girls” persona.  She came off to me, as more approachable, and down to earth.  Many of the other leading ladies of the time seem unapproachable and very diva-like. I am not saying that was true, but I think due to the times and what was considered the social norms, it was the way I read it. Doris has a different type of awareness of her strengths throughout her many roles, the way she holds herself and performers. I see this change from each movie role.

3.      This is a tough question, I so enjoyed this movie growing up and I think her sunny persona was an asset for me to be engaged with the character and made her more likable. It fits the movies of the time to me, as they were so bright and shiny. Her brightness adds to Calamity’s determination and doggedness approach of life. You see her growth throughout the movie more from very bright, to more subdued when she finds herself.  I like the brightness, but watching the movie again today, her persona at some points feels a bit over the top, but that is only with today’s lens.    

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On 6/18/2018 at 10:51 PM, Dr. Vanessa Theme Ament said:

 

  1. How do you think Doris Day grows as an actress in her various roles in the 1950s, before and after this musical?
  2. I like her singing.  I can't compare to other roles because I rarely watch her films.  Howard Keel is the only reason I would watch this.
  3.  
  4. Does Doris Day’s bright and sunny persona add or detract from the role of Calamity Jane in your opinion? Please defend your answer.

 I don't buy her as a ruffian.  I think the one Hitchcock film she did was good....but she is so firmly set in my head as those other squeaky clean parts I don't see past that.

 

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I really like the contrast of Doris Day's sunny personality with a rougher, tougher character. I have always been a fan of women who mix hard and soft - for example, somebody as classically cute and pretty as Day wearing menswear. There's something fun, and maybe a little bit transgressive, with putting somebody as cute as Day into rougher clothes. It also makes sense that she could morph into a slightly more feminine - but still tomboyish - woman by the end of the movie. 

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15 hours ago, Movie Buff 56 said:

I’ve always had a problem with the exaggerated mannerisms of the movie tomboy.  Betty Hutton’s Annie, Doris Day’s Calam, Debbie Reynolds’ Molly Brown, make me cringe.   It’s as if the director and actress felt it wouldn’t be entertaining enough unless facial expressions and gestures were so broad it verged on hammy.  As much as I liked Betty Hutton (“I Wish I Didn’t Love You So” from The Perils of Pauline is one of my favorite songs ) I couldn’t stand her mugging.  (And I know it’s terrible of me to say, but I’m one who could watch Lucy but I never loved her for the same reason.)  I almost feel embarrassed for them as they’re made to look foolish for the sake of a laugh, and the characters seemed false.  Then when they become more refined and lady-like it’s so much on the opposite end of the spectrum it again doesn’t ring true. 
  

Completely agree!

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As you reflect upon female representation in the 1950s, where do you think this film character falls in the continuum? Why?

The character of Calamity Jane falls somewhere in the middle of the 1950s female representation. In the beginning, she is competing in a man’s world by acting and dressing as a man. But, in order to get Bill Hickok’s attention, she must become more feminine. Going to the opposite end of the spectrum, she fails and comes to a compromise. Granted, she maintains her masculine garb with a more feminine edge, but she is still conforming rather than being accepted as the person she is.

Her character must always straddle the line between feminine and masculine and we see that in the fact that, as she rides her horse, she swings her leg over the pommel in an imitation of the feminine way of riding side-saddle, and yet towards the end of the song, swings her leg back and rides astride. In the first scene, she is ridiculed even though the community, as a whole, respects what she brings to the community: connection to the outside world and protection. By the end of the film, she is still providing the same services to the community, but by being more feminine, she is more readily accepted.

 

How do you think Doris Day grows as an actress in her various roles in the 1950s, before and after this musical?

When you look at Doris Day roles from her earliest appearances (e.g., Romance on the High Seas, It’s a Great Feeling), she is playing a more typical female character, one that is trying to please the man and be molded into the person he wants her to be. In the 1950s and later films, even the non-musical films, she plays far more three-dimensional characters who have both admirable traits as well as flaws.

Even in her romantic comedies (late 1950s to early 1960s), she’s not playing typical female roles from this same period. Often, her characters are career women and women who excel in their field. But, typical of the time period, her character will often compromise to the male characters in the same film. Some people have condemned her roles from this period as “goody-goody,” virginal characters, but in reality, her characters are far more self-actualized. In 1962’s A Touch of Mink, she goes off with Cary Grant and a series of events prevents her from actually having an affair with him, but she did travel with him for that purpose. By the end of the film, she actually becomes the aggressor, something women in early 1960s films would not do.

 

Does Doris Day’s bright and sunny persona add or detract from the role of Calamity Jane in your opinion? Please defend your answer.

Because Doris Day is such a likeable personality, she can bring a lighter touch to the more masculine image of Calamity Jane. In the hands of a less capable actress, the character might come off more annoying and less sympathetic. Her athletic ability (jumping up on the bar) is something the audience can enjoy, showing her more playful side rather than just rough-housing. And yet, the audience can she definitely means business when she pulls her revolver and is not someone to be taken for granted.

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