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Annie Get Your Gun - Betty replaces Judy - A Study of "Doin' What Comes Natur'lly"

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Thanks for posting the two clips. Judy's a fantastic singer. I think Betty has better rapport with the kids. And Betty's is much more animated, using her arms and legs and facial expressions more than Judy, which enlivens the song considerably.

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28 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Thanks for posting the two clips. Judy's a fantastic singer. I think Betty has better rapport with the kids. And Betty's is much more animated, using her arms and legs and facial expressions more than Judy, which enlivens the song considerably.

I can’t Judy in the role. Betty owned that. Just imagine Ethel Merman did it on Broadway.

 

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I actually think Judy is much more natural with the kids, and, as I said somewhere else, I think her depiction is less animated because, being Francis Gumm from the nether regions of northern Minnesota, playing a country bumpkin as broadly as Betty did seemed a bit condescending. I'll concede she seems to be staring off at the wrong spot in some of her dialogue, but I look as these two clips, and I think Judy would have delivered another amazing performance on the film.  

I really can't take Betty's performance in terms of being an 11 out 10 on the character's personality volume. Too much.  Really kills any pleasure I get from this musical.  Any...

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I've seen the clips of Judy's songs featured in THAT'S ENTERTAINMENT III.  She does a good job and seems to have fun with the role, but she seems so fragile, both physically and emotionally; I think her take on the role would have been very different from Betty Hutton's.  For one, while Hutton was a successful recording star, Garland was a far superior singer.  Oh, Judy could belt out a song, but she also could successfully dial back the delivery and show true emotion.  She would have been magnificent in the two slow ballads.

Garland also was a fairly good physical match for the real Annie Oakley and would have done a much better job giving us more character development, vulnerability, and subtlety.  Hutton is about as subtle as a bulldozer in most of her roles, and this one is no different.  The "aw, shucks, t'weren't nothin'" only gets you so far (see a couple of her singing performances on youtube--"Murder, He Says" and "Old Man Moses"--and notice the almost frenetic movements and facial expressions--always mugging, always full out).  For the life of me, I don't understand the staging and choreography for "I Got the Sun in the Mornin'".  By this time in Oakley's career, she was a polished performer who always was impeccably groomed.  A great part of her appeal was that she didn't appear to be competing with men even when she out shot them.  She didn't just dress like a lady, she became a lady despite her impoverished, sometimes miserable upbringing.  You can dress up Hutton's Annie, but apparently you can't take the yokel out of the sharpshooter.  And those herky-jerky arm movements completely ruin the performance.

What Hutton does get right is the physicality of the part.  She's strong and healthy, and we can believe she's been huntin' and trappin' since she was eight years old.  We also can believe she's capable of the horseback riding and that she's a match for Keel's Frank Butler.  (And don't get me started on how Frank Butler is written and portrayed in this movie.  Oy!)

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46 minutes ago, Rose1957 said:

I've seen the clips of Judy's songs featured in THAT'S ENTERTAINMENT III.  She does a good job and seems to have fun with the role, but she seems so fragile, both physically and emotionally; I think her take on the role would have been very different from Betty Hutton's.  For one, while Hutton was a successful recording star, Garland was a far superior singer.  Oh, Judy could belt out a song, but she also could successfully dial back the delivery and show true emotion.  She would have been magnificent in the two slow ballads.

Garland also was a fairly good physical match for the real Annie Oakley and would have done a much better job giving us more character development, vulnerability, and subtlety.  Hutton is about as subtle as a bulldozer in most of her roles, and this one is no different.  The "aw, shucks, t'weren't nothin'" only gets you so far (see a couple of her singing performances on youtube--"Murder, He Says" and "Old Man Moses"--and notice the almost frenetic movements and facial expressions--always mugging, always full out).  For the life of me, I don't understand the staging and choreography for "I Got the Sun in the Mornin'".  By this time in Oakley's career, she was a polished performer who always was impeccably groomed.  A great part of her appeal was that she didn't appear to be competing with men even when she out shot them.  She didn't just dress like a lady, she became a lady despite her impoverished, sometimes miserable upbringing.  You can dress up Hutton's Annie, but apparently you can't take the yokel out of the sharpshooter.  And those herky-jerky arm movements completely ruin the performance.

What Hutton does get right is the physicality of the part.  She's strong and healthy, and we can believe she's been huntin' and trappin' since she was eight years old.  We also can believe she's capable of the horseback riding and that she's a match for Keel's Frank Butler.  (And don't get me started on how Frank Butler is written and portrayed in this movie.  Oy!)

Don't get me started on his performance.  It sounds like we have similar takes on the movie and respective strengths/weaknesses.  You just said it far better than I did. 

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 I missed your post, so I posted the same comparison question on the TCM Musicals class for this week's lesson. The replies here are wonderful. Thank you, MotherofZeus for validating my personal opinion!

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22 hours ago, jawz63 said:

I can’t Judy in the role. Betty owned that. Just imagine Ethel Merman did it on Broadway.

 

I had the Ethel Merman Original Cast Broadway album and I believe I've seen her do it on some variety shows.

But my favorite Annie was Mary Martin. She was in the Roadshow and I saw her on a TV special co-starring with George Raitt.

Mary was from Texas - - in fact JR from Dallas TV fame was her son. Mary was a natural for this part and she didn't have to really pull for it.

I'm sure Judy would have been great because she always was.

Ethel Merman was overbearing in the part, she always was.

And Betty Hutton was like, well the way she always was-- hyper-exasperating and begging for the audience's attention to the point that you just felt sorry for her. But it certainly worked for her in The Miracle of Morgan's Creek

Doris Day also did a studio recording on Columbia of Annie Get Your Gun with Robert Goulet. So she might have been quite good too, when you realize the role may be a little similar to Calamity Jane, and as James Cagney said: " I always said that girl could sing. " LOL

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22 hours ago, jawz63 said:

I can’t Judy in the role. Betty owned that. Just imagine Ethel Merman did it on Broadway.

I agree that Betty owned it. But it's easier to say this since she gives us the complete version and Judy was unable to. What I love about Betty's performance is she's so natural with the kids. When she over enunciates or growls a line in the song, the kids mimic her and we get this real playful quality. I honestly think Betty is performing this movie for her real-life kids, using motion picture entertainment to entertain her own children. So she transcends the material because she is using it to reach a unique target audience. And this gives her performance something motherly and something very timeless.

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1 hour ago, Rose1957 said:

I've seen the clips of Judy's songs featured in THAT'S ENTERTAINMENT III.  She does a good job and seems to have fun with the role, but she seems so fragile, both physically and emotionally; I think her take on the role would have been very different from Betty Hutton's.  For one, while Hutton was a successful recording star, Garland was a far superior singer.  Oh, Judy could belt out a song, but she also could successfully dial back the delivery and show true emotion.  She would have been magnificent in the two slow ballads.

Garland also was a fairly good physical match for the real Annie Oakley and would have done a much better job giving us more character development, vulnerability, and subtlety.  Hutton is about as subtle as a bulldozer in most of her roles, and this one is no different.  The "aw, shucks, t'weren't nothin'" only gets you so far (see a couple of her singing performances on youtube--"Murder, He Says" and "Old Man Moses"--and notice the almost frenetic movements and facial expressions--always mugging, always full out).  For the life of me, I don't understand the staging and choreography for "I Got the Sun in the Mornin'".  By this time in Oakley's career, she was a polished performer who always was impeccably groomed.  A great part of her appeal was that she didn't appear to be competing with men even when she out shot them.  She didn't just dress like a lady, she became a lady despite her impoverished, sometimes miserable upbringing.  You can dress up Hutton's Annie, but apparently you can't take the yokel out of the sharpshooter.  And those herky-jerky arm movements completely ruin the performance.

What Hutton does get right is the physicality of the part.  She's strong and healthy, and we can believe she's been huntin' and trappin' since she was eight years old.  We also can believe she's capable of the horseback riding and that she's a match for Keel's Frank Butler.  (And don't get me started on how Frank Butler is written and portrayed in this movie.  Oy!)

Does Betty Hutton in this movie remind you of Debbie Reynolds in The Unsinkable Molly Brown?

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"Does Betty Hutton in this movie remind you of Debbie Reynolds in The Unsinkable Molly Brown?"

 

To an extent she does, especially in the beginning of the movie.  Indeed, Reynolds goes full out for 90% of the movie, but the big differences between the two performances:  Reynolds was much more graceful (and therefore more natural), and she did a better job at showing genuine character development.

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