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Tomilee

Singing in the Rain

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Singing in the Rain is still one of the funniest musicals ever produced. As a creator of digital media who works with a variety of talent under a variety of conditions, I can still identify with the audio challenges and challenges with filming in general.

I love, love, love the character of Lina Lamont! And what an amazing movie for the talents of Gene Kelly, Debbie Reynolds and Donald O'Connor.

The re-purposing of the older tunes actually helped me enjoy the older movies of the past weeks even more. It kind of worked in reverse for me. I'm going to have to read a lot more about the tech challenges and behind the scenes making of this movie.

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I agree! I totally got into The Broadway Melody because I recognized so much from Singin in the Rain.  Having watched this movie so much as a kid, I think it really helped me connect with the '30s musicals.  Turns out I love the '30s musicals.  So great full to take this class to be able to appreciate movies I've never seen before.  

Oh, and Dr. ament being a foley artist and speaking on perspective of the challenges of that subject immediately made me think of the scene in SitR where her necklace beads are being picked up by the mic. And subsequent takes with varying degrees of disaster/hilarity.   It's so fascinating to think about movies from different perspectives within the industry.  I think Modern Romance with Albert Brooks' was the most recent movie that made me aware of foleying as an art.  Super cool that our prof. really did this and has an awareness of this art form and technical side that she's shared with us.  

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Foley (named after sound-effects artist Jack Foley)[1]is the reproduction of everyday sound effects that are added to film, video, and other media in post-production to enhance audio quality.[2]These reproduced sounds can be anything from the swishing of clothing and footsteps to squeaky doors and breaking glass. The best Foley art is so well integrated into a film that it goes unnoticed by the audience.[3]It helps to create a sense of reality within a scene. Without these crucial background noises, movies feel unnaturally quiet and uncomfortable.
 
from Wikipedia. 
 
Side benefit of the class? Increased vocabulary! 
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This is my favorite dance number in Singing in the Rain.  Gene Kelly and Donald O’Connor were an exciting team.   I wonder why they were not paired in other musicals.   Did anyone else notice that when they were singing Moses  Supposes that the drapes in the shot looked like a robe from The Ten Commandments?

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Really enjoyed how they used history in a 50"s musical wrapper. It was a delight to see those old tunes revived. It energized the brain comparing and contrast the early tune with the remix. I never get tired of it.

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On 6/20/2018 at 6:27 AM, Marica said:
 
Foley (named after sound-effects artist Jack Foley)[1]is the reproduction of everyday sound effects that are added to film, video, and other media in post-production to enhance audio quality.[2]These reproduced sounds can be anything from the swishing of clothing and footsteps to squeaky doors and breaking glass. The best Foley art is so well integrated into a film that it goes unnoticed by the audience.[3]It helps to create a sense of reality within a scene. Without these crucial background noises, movies feel unnaturally quiet and uncomfortable.
 
from Wikipedia. 
 
Side benefit of the class? Increased vocabulary! 

While editing a video on soil, I needed the sound of mud plops and could find or afford to buy the sfx so I decided to make it myself. I was unable to think of another item that would make the sound of mud so I brought mud into the sound studio and patted, plopped, and smacked it until I got the sounds I needed. Boy did I get in trouble for making a mess!

Also, when we mic a person, we still have to be careful not to get rustling in clothing and to remove necklaces that cause sound problems. We don't have the time or luxury of re-dubbing dialogue for our low-budget educational videos so we have to record "clean" audio the first time around.

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8 hours ago, Tomilee said:

We don't have the time or luxury of re-dubbing dialogue for our low-budget educational videos so we have to record "clean" audio the first time around.

It's interesting to think about the behind-the-scenes complexity of what outwardly seem such simple creations. (And I use that word purposefully.) To me (before this course!) I would think that recording the video lectures would require a quiet space, good lighting, a tripod and a nice video camera. About what I'd need to tape my grandson's birthday party. And I bet there are things I create that others would likewise be naively ignorant regarding the complexity behind the creation. For example, I hand you a home grown tomato and you think all I needed to do is stick a plant in the ground, water it, maybe throw some Miracle Grown on it and bing bamo! 

So in addition to an increased vocabulary, taking this class has reminded me that there's almost always more than meets the eye!

Also-- what a funny story! I wonder if different kinds of soil (clay, loamy, etc.) make different splattering mud sounds?

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If you want some wonderful background on this film, head over to youtube and search for Diane Sawyer's interview with Stanley Donen and the various clips of Patricia Ward Kelly (Gene Kelly's official biographer and his widow).  For one, they both debunk the old story about how the crew put milk in the rainwater in the "Singin' in the Rain" dance so it would show up better on camera.  For another, PWK confirms that Gene almost always did his own Foley work.

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