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DAILY DOSE OF DELIGHT #11 (From Singin' in the Rain

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1) The pre-dance movements of the two dancers are much slower and more deliberate, as the rhythm of the words they are repeating builds into the moment where the music from the orchestra kicks in.  As the 'bigness' of the music increases, so do their movements - both in size and in comedic broadness.  For example, Kelly has the moment where he jumps on the chair and drapes the curtains around himself in an attempt to imitate the Moses of the Bible.  It's one of the smoothest transitions into a musical number that I can think of, though others in this particular film are handled with equal aplomb.  Kelly prided himself on being the dancer of the proletariat (as opposed to Astaire's more elegant overall mien, representing a more aristocratic social status), and he often worked his way into a dance by using whatever materials fall to the character's hand (cf. the "Squeaky Board and Newspaper" number in Summer Stock.

2) The straight man literally gets jerked around in this number, as the two dancers pull him from one part of the room to another, sit him atop a desk, stick a wastebasket on his head, etc.  He's sort of the butt of their joke, and so all he can really do is express dismay and disgruntled surprise in both his facial mannerisms and in the way he carries himself.  I imagine it's much more difficult to play straight well than one would immediately think, and I almost feel sorry for how little credit I've given him in the dozens of times I've watched this scene.  It's really hard for me to look at him, to be honest; I just want to watch Don and Cosmo!

3) The alpha and beta roles are much less clearly defined in this particular scene than they are throughout the movie.  At the very beginning of the film, when the crowd at the premiere of The Royal Rascal are so excited to see big stars and there is a collective sigh of disappointment when Cosmo emerges from his jalopy, we know that he has spent his entire career playing second banana to Don Lockwood.  This is hit home again and again throughout the film - Lina calls Cosmo a 'nobody,' and a mere 'piano player,' and yet he is often the one who comes up with the best ideas (e.g., using Kathy's voice for Lina's, coming up with the idea for combining the Broadway hoofer bit with the French costume stuff in order to save The Duelling Cavalier, etc.). 

In this dance number, they strike me more as equals, although it's obvious that O'Connor is more of a natural physical comedian than Kelly, and in that sense Cosmo Brown is the beta to Don Lockwood's alpha.  As much as I adore him, his dancing, and his musicals, Kelly was funny only when he was playing a ham or a cocky S.O.B.  And I don't think he was ever goofy.  In fact, I believe in later years O'Connor shared that he once asked Kelly about how he approaches comedy, and Kelly said that he never 'studied' it - as though being funny is like learning to drive a car or to speak a bit of French the next time you go to Paris.  

Just have to add that the little solo bit Gene Kelly does in this number is one of my favorite moments of all of his dancing numbers.  It's just so... BAM.  He's so physically strong: he's got complete control of his muscles and yet he's moving explosively at the same time.    

You don't need to point, Cosmo - I'm watching.  

 

Screen Shot 2018-06-20 at 11.43.13 AM.png

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    How do the pre-dance movements of O’Connor and Kelly compare to their actual dance movements?

The hand slapping on the desk is one way their behaviors pre-dance compare to their dance movements. They also have a rhythmic line of singing which sets up the dance rhythm

    Watch the Professor all the way through and consider the role of the straight man.

Yes, I did. He looks incredulous, and not appreciative. It must be hard to keep a straight face and play along like that. He obviously could not dance the same way - even a little bit. He had to lean on Gene Kelly as they were moving from the window to the first chair, which might be a trust issue, but he got through it fine.

    How do the representations of masculinity in all three men compare and contrast with each other?

Don and Cosmo are masculine, while the instructor is less so. Cosmo, being the beta male, is less masculine than Don. But we know the history of Don and Cosmo as buddies from childhood, and while Cosmo might be the brains of the operation, Don is the face of it.

 

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Posted (edited)

2. Watch the professor and consider the role of the straight man. 

 

This scene always cracks me up because Kelly and O’Connor are clowning with the draperies that look like Jewish prayer shawls when they sing “Moooooooo-ses.” Since our professor mentioned that the actor playing the professor was best known for portraying Hitler, I can see that postwar audiences, especially if Jewish, would have picked up on the Hitler-bashing subtext. Also if you imagine this guy as a fervent, dictatorial Hitler, you can see how meek he is acting here. He does a lot with his eyes, and he keeps his voice and mannerisms fussy and twee. All that just adds a layer to how amazing this scene is in every way. 

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Though not as apparent as other parts of the movie, there are some distinctions seen between the three men in the clip. First the distinction between the two dancers - Gene Kelly and Donald O'Connor and the professor. The two dancers in the exchange prior to the musical sequence show that they are less serious, more relaxed and easier to engage with. This, of course, can be seen throughout the dance sequence, as they are more modern and of course the preference for the way men should act, according to the film.

The difference between Kelly and O'Connor is a bit harder to detect just based on this scene. For one, the dance sequence takes up a large portion of the clip and they spend a lot of the time dancing in sync to one another. Kelly, physically, is larger than O'Connor, and that can be seen in the dancing. Of note, I once read that Kelly preferred to dance in clothing more fitted to his body, and in this scene, you can see it. But what marks Kelly as the Alpha and O'Connor as his opposite is found in the interaction prior to the musical sequence. O'Connor becomes the clown. Because alpha males would never project anything other than confidence, O'Connor shows that he is not the alpha male. 

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1.     How do the pre-dance movements of O’Connor and Kelly compare to their actual dance movements?

O’Connor’s rubbery facial expressions reflect how his dance style differs slightly from Kelly’s: O’Connor seems to be a bit looser and more elastic than Kelly.  Also, there is a definite rhythm and “poetry” to O’Connor’s and Kelly’s words and movements—after their initial “stiffness”—as they repeat the tongue twisters more quickly, which prepares them and the audience for the song and dance that this leads into.  This rhythm carries over into the beginning of the dance, which quickens just as their words and pre-dance movements do.

2.     Watch the Professor all the way through and consider the role of the straight man.

Very early in the scene, the professor realizes O’Connor and Kelly are not taking him seriously.  In fact, he catches O’Connor mocking him with his facial expressions (which are very humorous, despite a slight editing gaff?).  They then continue to mock the tongue twister about Moses by using the drapes as garments, with the professor looking at each of them with displeasure.  It seems that they try to encourage the professor to join in their dance, but he is either not interested or not as limber as the dancers.  This is evident when the professor is in the background so we can focus on the dancers.  Then they end up simply walking him across the room to the other chair instead of dancing with him, at which point both dancers do their brief solos.  Even though we can see the professor—the straight man—in the background, it is as if he has been taken out of the equation now that his role of setting up the song-and-dance number is now finished.  In a sense, he has set up the “joke” and O’Connor and Kelly are delivering the “punch line.”  Finally, by the end, the professor is removed from the equation completely when O’Connor and Kelly cover him with the chair, the cover from the piano, lamp shade and picture of the letter A.

3.     How do the representations of masculinity in all three men compare and contrast with each other?

As has been noted in earlier video discussions—at least as I recall, although I cannot find the module at this time—Kelly brought a masculinity and athleticism to his dancing. These are clearly on display in both performers in this dance number.  Only one example of this is when they both jump backwards onto the chairs behind them and dance on the chairs without losing a beat or their balance.  Or even when they are dancing on the desk earlier in the number.  And they show this athleticism with a wonderful style and grace.  As a teacher myself, I don’t necessarily agree with the following stereotype, but professors can be perceived as more scholarly or erudite, and less physical or athletic?  At least, that is how I perceive the professor to be in this scene, making the dancers “manlier” by comparison.

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3 hours ago, Warne's Brat said:

Hi - Interesting final point.  Could you please clarify what you mean by the comment about Gene Kelly?  Are you intentionally separating the actor from the character he is playing?  In what way is GK a beta male?  

I don't know if my response is what Jon Severino had in mind, but I have been thinking about that post and surmised that the analysis has to do with genre and the direction of Hollywood's leading male actors in the 1960s (and possibly in the 50s).  Gene Kelly can more than capably perform as the lead alpha male in these musicals, but I have a hard time picturing him taking on the roles of Warren Beatty, Steve McQueen, Clint Eastwood, Burt Lancaster, etc.  This statement is not an indictment of Kelly, nor should it be taken as a ranking of which actor is better.  But as the musical waned and the studio system eroded, Hollywood seemingly prioritized certain characteristics in its male leads, and the types of movies and roles in which Kelly was great were no longer as plentiful.  

So I don't think GK is a beta male, but he would have a hard time being an alpha male in a western or action flick just as Eastwood and Lee Marvin struggled mightily in Paint Your Wagon.  

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This was the first classic movie that I remember truly enjoying, and as such it holds a special place in my heart as being one of my top 3 favorite classic movies. 

This was never necessarily my favorite dance sequence (I think that is still Donald O'Connor's Make 'Em Laugh that occurs earlier in the film), but I have always been struck but the beautiful choreography and synchronicity between O'Connor and Kelly. From the very beginning of the sequence they are playing off of each other, feeding off of each other. They are equal in dancing, even though the story plays them as being unequal in terms of attracting women. They use the beats of the tongue twister to begin establishing the beats of their dancing. Eventually the tongue twister takes a backseat to the dancing. We are then left with the dictation lessons in the dust (along with the professor) and given a showcase of dancing. 

The professor plays the straight man and is a key part of the scene, even though he ends up disappearing beneath a pile of debris from the office. He appears very stuffy and although he seems to think that Don is coach-able, he takes his job more seriously than Don and Cosmo (and by extension the audience) think he should. Without him being there, Don and Cosmo can't show their personalities and then their dancing. 

There are three representations of masculinity in these characters. Don Lockwood is the Alpha Male - he is handsome, successful and competent. Having just come from the scene in which Lena is struggling so much with her dictation lessons (proving that she is an incompetent and ditzy female), and then going into a scene in which Don pronounces "can't" correctly, we see that he is in charge and successful. He is the man that women want to end up with. Cosmo is the Beta Male. He is charming, but no matter how charming he is he is nothing more than the comic relief. He is there to encourage Don, to build him up and help him get the girl at the end. The Professor is the eccentric, and being the eccentric he serves as nothing more than a backdrop on which the talents of Don and Cosmo can shine. 

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I need help here.  I am not sure what the reference to the pre-dance movements mean.  So I have some difficulty responding to this question.  

As a pronunciation instructor I loved this clip and had such fun with it. The necessary evil of matching voice and lips together in film during this time period. 

It amazes me the part of the strait man.  During the filming of this clip it must have had many takes and a lot of fun. 

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It seems to me that they start out slow and move into a faster pace as they start to dance.

As for the professor you see him at the start thinking that he is getting through to the two of them and then as the scene progresses it looks like he has lost the whole thing and then at the end he sees that they really have learned how to speak even if it isn't the way he planned.

In the scene you see the professor as the straight man and both O'Connor and Kelly as the clowns. Kelly is more of the serious one and O'Connor is more of the fool.

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The pre-dance words and taps are like a conductor's counted bar before the downbeat; it establishes the time and rhythm used throughout the number.

How DOES the professor keep his demeanor?  Seeing O'Connor's mime behind him and still he keeps his countenance?  I could never do it!

The masculinity model here is unity, each one echoing the other in time and step.  There is a friendly "banter" and competition through rhythm.  It is the "buddy system" personified in music.

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1. You can see that the two of them aren't taking the diction lesson seriously. Throughout most of the movie, the two characters in general don't take much of anything seriously, so this isn't surprising. Once they take the book away from the instructor, they start to get into a sing-song pattern of speech and start clapping. It's a classic indicator of a song and dance about to begin. Once the movement begins, it's as casual and comfortable as their whole friendship seems to be. They're really synced up with each other, literally and figuratively, performing at the same level.

2. The straight man is usually there to bring balance to a scene. They act like any person would who wasn't involved in a big dance number happening around them. They can also be used as a prop for the funny characters. The instructor in this case is more bewildered than anything, kind of baffled by what the other two are doing. He gets to be the audience that makes the scene more grounded into reality, instead of just a dance number happening with no one around for no reason. 

3. The instructor is seen as the most feeble of the three. He's more practical minded and focused on teaching, definitely not the type to break into song and dance. I always see Donald O'Connor as the goofball, since he usually plays the supporting character, which isn't any different in this movie. Gene Kelly, as usual, is cast as the strong, tougher guy. I think that goes for most movies he's in. Since he's set up that way, I see him as the most masculine of the three. Going off of the characters of Don and Cosmo, it lines up that way, too, with Cosmo as second fiddle and Don as the lead getting the girl. 

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Just an additional note:  I don't equate the qualities of the professor (eccentric, intellectual, reticent, etc. are some of the replies) as feminine qualities per se.  They just aren't as alpha male.

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Before the music starts, they are already in rhythm with the tongue twister.  It gives them an easy Segway into the song and dance.  This is frequently used in musicals to seamlessly get into the music.  

The poor diction coach!!!  He starts out looking good and being in control.  It all falls apart when they start singing and dancing.  The professor looks perplexed and totally shocked.  This is typical strait man.  He starts the scene or a routine with good intentions but the comic blows things out of the water by being totally stupid or being a real wise guy.  

In the scene Don is the proverbial alpha male with Cosmo the beta male who may not get the mischief going but the brains to keep it going.  Unfortunately the professor is caught in the middle as a confused innocent bystander.

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1 - When the professor declaims the verse, Donald's character does a funny faces joking with his manner of talking, next when Don repeats the verse, he and Donald's declaim together and make movements with their hands imitating professor and they represent the verse singing.

2 - The professor is theatrical to his job and speaks a formal way.

3 - The professor is so formal even the way he speaks, Donald's makes a comical presence "imitating the verses" and Don is the good looking guy.

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1. The pre-dance movements lead into the dancing, slowly. First, as the professor is doing the exercises O'Connor is nodding his head in rhythm, then even his funny facial movements are done in rhythm. But, all is done in light, quick movements, just like the tapping. They move to the curtains an play with them, the play builds into the dance. As they move away from the curtains O'Connor especially is moving in legs in wider movements and clapping his hands (making tap sounds), so that when the tapping does begin it isn't quite unexpected or 'jarring' to the ear. Just before they jump up on the table and really start dancing they tap their hands on the table, giving the audience another hint at the tapping to come. Everything is rhythmic, staccato (like tap dancing generally is- unlike the smooth quiet one thinks of when one thinks of ballet).  I also feel like the way they move around the room prior to the dancing is a way of exploring their space and props. - they're going to use the chairs they pass by, right at the scene begins we see the posters of the lips enunciating each vowel - at the end they take it down and pile it on the professor. 

2. I think the straight man doesn't tend to get enough credit. It's hard to be the straight man in comedy. This time though, the straight man is more the 'prop'. At the beginning he doesn't realize they're mocking him. As they ask him to do another he thinks it's a compliment - he stands straighter, looks proud, and does another tongue twister. But, as O'Connor and Kelly begin to play and dance he is 'disapproving' in his expression. Finally he is simply used as an audience member - almost forgotten - then used as a prop at the end when they drag him back onto the screen, sit him on the desk and pile everything else on top of them.

3. Here we see three different types of men and masculinity. The professor is almost foppish - his actions, how 'proper' he is. He's also older, more fatherly or grandfatherly - his masculinity (or lack thereof) is unimportant. 

Donald O'Connor is once again the classic Beta male - he is of no threat to Kelly's masculinity. O'Connor is dressed in a lighter color - the bright green sweater - gives us a different feeling than the dark, masculine color of Kelly's brown sweater. Also, partly due to their build, and probably partly purposely done by the costumer's it seems that Kelly's clothes are just a titch tighter, showing off his muscularity and build. Kelly's dancing style has always been considered more athletic, and while O'Connor is his equal in dancing, there's still more masculinity in Kelly. Also, throughout the movie O'Connor's character Cosmo is simply the friend. He is of no threat to the women anywhere - he's a joker. He doesn't get up and offer to do the movie stunts, Kelly's character does. We see Kelly ask the 'risk-taker', O'Connor is his sounding board. Gene Kelly - even when dancing is more of man's man - he's simply more masculine. 

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A couple of observations about Singing in the Rain:  the fact that Arthur Freed copied the melody of Be a Clown for Make "Em Laugh puts a blot on the film.  Other picky items:  Debbie is dubbed in "Would You" when they are making fun of Jean Hagen for Debbie dubbing her.  Very bad hairdo and costuming on Debbie.  Those items aside, of course there is much to love in the film.  I just don't think it's the greatest ever, nor perfect.  How come no discussion of "Love Me Tonight" in this course?  The Moses Supposes number is a good one, but it is bit spoiled by playing to the audience in the last frame.

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COLORING OUTSIDE THE LINES (and hoping for feedback)

I was excited when I saw this week's attention to male and female gender roles in 50's musicals. Especially on account of the current cultural concern with gender fluidity, I expected more discussion (and maybe it is scheduled for future discussions) of coded behavior and of questioning of stereotypical roles. I think we were getting there with the discussion of Calamity Jane, but I don't see the Road pictures as  good vehicle for examining masculine roles. Moses Supposes in Singin' in the Rain clearly does allow for examinations of the buddy trope with its competitive companionship, but it skirts as many gender issues as it raises.  The film that does take this critique seriously is It's Always Fair Weather, not always a successful film but a brave attempt at looking at the public and inner lives of WWII veterans that often defies alpha and beta categories. I was glad to see the stills of the famous garbage lid dance, but I think the whole film deserves extended consideration in any discussion of gender roles. 

Two other issues: Why is Marilyn Monroe so often teamed with men who would fit this course's category of Beta Males? She is opposite Donald O'Connor in There's No Business Like Show Business and Tommy Noonan in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. Any ideas on the dynamic here?

Finally, Elvis and the emergence of black performers like Little Richard in rock and roll films that appeal to teens: This has got to be a challenge to the whole Alpha and Beta categorization of men. Right? I look forward to the discussion. 

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l like Singing in the Rain  In the part that we watch they real need a straight man to make the scene to work for thir dance .They needed the pre dance steps to make it look good for the dance number that followed that is my way of thinking. l do think that the work well together and that they complement each other in the musical number that they were doing . They were on and equal footing so to speak.

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First of all, "Singin' in the Rain" has been my favorite musical film for most of my life. Watching the pre-dance movements between Kelly and O'Connor you can just feel them building up to the beginnings of a song and dance.

They both make the movements look so effortless. The steps seem to flow out of their bodies. This is the reason why I never noticed the professor's reactions before until today. The poor man looks absolutely shell-shocked throughout the entire scene, which makes him a perfect foil for the constant activity around him. 

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Response to #1. 

I've always thought Donald O'Connor was Gene Kelly's best dance partner, and their dance relationship is on best display in this routine. O'Connor takes the comic foil position to Kelly's romantic lead at the beginning of the routine (Beta to Alpha Male if you want to call it that), but they play so well off of each other and mirror each other's steps so completely that most of the time I forget I'm watching two distinct dancers with two very distinct styles at work (because O'Connor and Kelly danced quite differently). The movement at the beginning of the number introduces us to the characters a little - O'Connor is going to be the funnyman, and Kelly is going to be the take charge guy. We continue to see these personality traits play out for the remainder of the song and dance. 

Response to #2.

The Professor is the straight man to the dynamic duo of O'Connor and Kelly. They need him as the grounding rod through which to channel their energy and action as they sing and dance. Most of his behavior is not self-guided; instead, O'Connor and Kelly are guiding him through motions and into places throughout the number, so he doesn't make many decisions for himself. Isn't that how the straight man always plays it, though? He's there to bear the brunt of the comedian's decisions (for good or ill). 

Response to #3. 

O'Connor has always been a favorite actor of mine, and if I had to choose one of the three to hang out with, it would be O'Connor. Kelly's alpha male characters tend to be one-sided; the professor's straight man character is bland and stereotypical; O'Connor plays the beta/foil repeatedly, but his foils are always nuanced and interesting. Within a number like this, you need the different personality types to play off of each other, since there is no female present to act as the target or the focus of the piece. 

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This is one of my favorite scenes from this movie.  One of the reasons the scene is such a success is the rythmic language feeding into the desk drumming and into the final dance.  The roles of the men are all variations of different sterotypes.  The professor is the older, staid academic, O'Connor is the young, funny guy, and Gene Kelly is the alpha male of the scene.  Usually I just enjoy the dance, but this time I noticed how much O'Connor glances over at Kelly during the number.  I am sure it was one way of toning down his higher center of gravity and more rambunctious style to that of Kelly.  This adds to his being the secondary male in the movie, but also to his being the secondary star to director Kelly.  Kelly's style made everything seem effortless and easy even in  this frenetic number.    

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This is a delightful scene, and the energy levels that O'Connor and Kelly maintain are incredible. I think the pre-dance movements are as choreographed as the dance movements themselves, with both men literally running circles around the instructor. I have always thought O'Connor is a slightly tighter dancer - while Gene is a little looser - and it's interesting to watch the two next to each other in such an exuberant scene. 

The professor holds sway only through his title - he's in no way an alpha male, so once the student shows competence, any control the teacher may have is gone. He gives Donald a chance to imitate him, make monkey faces, and in general fulfill his role of class clown. Every clown needs a straight man, someone to play off of, and it takes the professor a few minutes to catch up to what's really going on. And by that time, The alpha and his buddy are off and running.

That alpha is Gene; it's Gene who is receiving the benefit of the speech training. And ultimately the professor loses all personality while Gene and best buddy Donald get carried away dancing around the room, using whatever props are available, amusing each other, and bouncing off each other. The professor is no longer a straight man - he's just another prop - as Gene and Donald end the scene by stacking furniture on top of him. Gene can pronounce his vowels just fine, thank you!

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24 minutes ago, ESei said:

COLORING OUTSIDE THE LINES (and hoping for feedback)

I was excited when I saw this week's attention to male and female gender roles in 50's musicals. Especially on account of the current cultural concern with gender fluidity, I expected more discussion (and maybe it is scheduled for future discussions) of coded behavior and of questioning of stereotypical roles. I think we were getting there with the discussion of Calamity Jane, but I don't see the Road pictures as  good vehicle for examining masculine roles. Moses Supposes in Singin' in the Rain clearly does allow for examinations of the buddy trope with its competitive companionship, but it skirts as many gender issues as it raises.  The film that does take this critique seriously is It's Always Fair Weather, not always a successful film but a brave attempt at looking at the public and inner lives of WWII veterans that often defies alpha and beta categories. I was glad to see the stills of the famous garbage lid dance, but I think the whole film deserves extended consideration in any discussion of gender roles. 

Two other issues: Why is Marilyn Monroe so often teamed with men who would fit this course's category of Beta Males? She is opposite Donald O'Connor in There's No Business Like Show Business and Tommy Noonan in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. Any ideas on the dynamic here?

Finally, Elvis and the emergence of black performers like Little Richard in rock and roll films that appeal to teens: This has got to be a challenge to the whole Alpha and Beta categorization of men. Right? I look forward to the discussion. 

There is no way Little Richard appealed to young girls as an alpha male. I doubt even Elvis fit that. There's a different dynamic going on here, like the beginning of the anti-hero in movies. Pal Joey, also from 1957, although completely different musically and in style, was headed that way, too.

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17 hours ago, Dr. Vanessa Theme Ament said:
  • How do the pre-dance movements of O’Connor and Kelly compare to their actual dance movements?
     
  • Watch the Professor all the way through and consider the role of the straight man.
     
  • How do the representations of masculinity in all three men compare and contrast with each other?

1. The pre dance movements speak to their characters and their friendship and how they usually interact with each other. In the dance scenes they still have natural camaraderie and chemistry but they're doing the same dances together and the same steps. In the pre-dance parts, Cosmo makes Don laugh by mocking the professor with his funny faces. Don thinks its funny but keeps it professional. When they dance together they can both have fun.

2. The professor is there to help Don with his enuciation so he can be ready for work in talking pictures. He is an important character and takes his job seriously. So when Cosmo mocks him/makes funny faces to DOn while they're practicing its more humorous because he isn't in on the joke. It amplifies Don and Cosmo's playful relationship. The actual "Moses Supposes" song continues the sort of mocking and playfulness of the earlier scene and the professor remaining the uptight professional makes a great foil for Don and Cosmo to play off of. It keeps the number interesting and more entertaining. 

3. I look at it in terms of why the three men are in the room together. Don Lockwood is the leading man, a big star. Outside circumstances (the technological change of talkies) has forced him to work on his diction and enunciation. He needs and wants his successful career to continue so he had to take lessons. He is a bit wary of it because its new but he handles it well because he knows that his public wants to hear their stars talk. He also knows he needs to get his vocals right because poor speech could affect his good image of a romantic hero.

Cosmo Brown isn;t a star but works in the industry. His career isn't public facing but he is there to support his friend not just because he is a star, but because they've always had a close relationship since childhood. Cosmo has a behind the scenes career so he approaches the industry from that perspective but he also wants Don to do well with the vocal lessons because it could impact his career if he doesn't.

The professor seems to have a passion for language and speech. He is an authority figure and an expert. Because of the rise of the talkies, new professions (like speech therapy) would become important to the film industry and he was hired by the studio. He is an important man in that business now and his manner lets Cosmo and Don know it. 

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