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DAILY DOSE OF DELIGHT #11 (From Singin' in the Rain

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1.      Love the pre-dance part also, the professor reciting his tongue-twisters, that lead to clapping and twirling the professor around, then right into the number. The dance is staccato and fast paced too. The rhythm seems to build naturally into the song. The dance number is spectacular!

2.      The straight man is definitely the butt of the joke, the one getting teased. It is all done playfully, but he is the one being mocked.  He is stiff, and very serious. Gene Kelly and Donald O’Connor are the fun, creative types who totally take advantage of his seriousness. The professor stays in straight mode, not dancing or joining in at all. He maintains his role’s seriousness.

3.      This scene shows 3 different representations. The professor, kind of the fuddy-duddy, serious, smart, but no fun. The 2 buddies, which has the typical breakdown of alpha-male and his sidekick, the comic relief character. Even with these character types it is interesting how talent, the ability to sing and dance, levels the playing field. To me in the performance sequences, the differences are less. It is interesting how these representations are everywhere, in almost every movie.   

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  1. O’Connor and Kelly are already in rhythm and in sync even before the real dancing begins. It builds slowly, starting with movement and reaction, and then finally bursting into full dance that builds and builds until the big finish.
  2. The straight man is often underrated in movies—and very much so in comedies. O’Connor’s antics don’t work without the professor’s position and almost non-reaction at times.
  3. If this were set in high school, you’d have the smart, nerdy type (prof), the class clown (O’Connor), and the all-start jock (Kelly). In other parts of this film, there’s almost an indication that O'Connor and Kelly are more than friends. Yet there are key scenes and lines that indicate bromance, not romance, between the two. Their mannerisms, posture and demeanor, and a few quick scenes (O’Connor flirting at the party, a bit of dialogue by O'Connor about how Kelly's lines don't work on Reynolds) indicate that these are straight, masculine men in this film.

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I appreciated the opportunity to consider the professorial straight man in this clip. Full disclosure: I am myself a professor, so I have a slight bias toward the profession. In the family, my dad was often the one who delivered the joke (okay, Dad Jokes), but he had some finesse and liked to wait until the timing was perfect. As such, he appreciated a good set-up, and I was often the one who would deliver. And he always said to me-- there's no shame in being a good straight man (or second banana); it's necessary to the act. So the Professor was really excellent at setting it up, letting himself be tweaked and draped upon. Where the kids have been without him? 

But reflecting a little bit more on the dynamic of the situation. The skills being taught are absolutely necessary to the new medium of Talkies, and so the elocution lesson is essential to the plot. It is not only funny, but realistic -- actors and singers do this sort of verbal exercise all the time to train the instrument -- and it works. I've been noticing in the musicals how good the diction is, how easy it is to understand the words.  I think it's a tribute both to the technology and the performers' skill. You can't have a song move the plot forward if you don't understand what's being said. It may also be a reason why folks have more difficulty with the operatic styles of MacDonald-Eddy etc., it's just harder to understand the words, which are often more poetic and less direct to our ears. In the scene, it should not go unnoticed that the Professor is very capable, and can spit out those tongue-twisters with the best of them. Did he teach the boys anything, though? It's always difficult to tell in Musical World, because even in scenes where supposedly people are being taught (I'm thinking of Astaire and Rogers), it all happens pretty quickly and artificially. But for me, I got the impression that Kelly and O'Connor sort of already knew how to do these tongue-twisters, enough to be able to make fun of the professor. So, another message of the scene is that the Exuberant Youth of American just naturally, in the course of being themselves, already had all this Know-How and barely needed a stodgy Academic, member of the old guard, to tell them much of anything. Someone earlier referred to the Professor as a pseudo-Alpha Male, and maybe that's correct. But professors have rarely been Alpha Males, and the US especially has a very strong anti-academic streak. The Prof might be a representative of the old ways of book-learning, the outdated principles of education steeped in the classics that is no longer deemed useful in Post-War America. This comes through more in demeanor than content, the Professor's artificial, pseudo-British accent, glasses, suit and tie vs. the boys' casual collegiate sweater-chinos, although Moses is vaguely Biblical in tone. Back to the question of being a straight man: professors are invariably Straight Men, their role (especially Post-War) is to let the kids have their fun, and feed them enough so that they can get out into the world and do their own creative and dynamic thing with it. 

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  1. The first time I saw Singing in the Rain was on February 14, 1973. I was thirteen. It was in a downstairs studio for ACT at 450 Geary Street, in San Francisco - and it was a Steve Silver production (of Beach Blanket Babylon fame).  It was an amazing party, with two  actresses  (I remember one was Deborah May, and think Marsha Mason the other) from the company singing and dancing (I think on skates) to Sweetheart, dressed as gigantic frosted cupcakes.  He staged many sketches and had hotdogs, soda and popcorn.  After the skits and sketches were done, Steve Silver showed the movie!  Such a young Debbie Reynolds and the amazing dancing of O'conner and Kelly, but I think Jean Hagen was the only star who I had never seen in a film.  So, naturally I was slayed by her timing and wit.  I love this movie, I think of that party every time I see the film.  And at nearly sixty and having thrown and played at some crazy, beautiful, elegant and zany parties, that was still the very best party I have ever been to.  PS Thanks mom and thanks Steve.  sox
  2.  
  3.  How do the pre-dance movements of O’Connor and Kelly compare to their actual dance movements?

Kelly initially is attentive to the professor, you see the concentration on his face.  When O'Conner comes in it only times a moment for their chemistry to take over and the boys start to play, the way life long friends will do.

  1. Watch the Professor all the way through and consider the role of the straight man.
  2. The professor is a good straight man.  He follows the choreography and he allows them to mess with his clothes, hair and body without upstaging the antics of Kelly and O'Conner.
     
  3. How do the representations of masculinity in all three men compare and contrast with each other?
  4. I think this question is difficult because each is an alpha male in their own area. The professor is a top man in elocution, Kelly as an actor and O'Conner as a musician/composer.  

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The dance to "Moses Supposes" is creative and fun, and Gene Kelly and Donald O'Connor both enter this fun vibe with their actions (ex: O'Connor making faces while the professor enunciates, and Kelly sharing a friendly look towards O'Connor when he begins his practice). This then smoothly transitions into the dance where they almost seem to poke some fun at the very serious prof. Kelly and O'Connor are obviously more laid-back than the professor, and as described in the lecture notes, Kelly's character fits the Alpha Male who chases the girl (Debbie Reynolds) whereas O'Connor is the sidekick/comic-relief. 

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Daily Dose #11:

1) To me the pre-dance moves seem more graceful and softer than the actual dance moves in that they have less force. The moves seem more careful as the energy and rhythm build more to a frenzied state towards the end.

2)The role of the straight man is to be a tool that the other actors can use to heighten their comedy like with Donald Conner making the faces behind the teacher's back. 

2) In this scene, you see different representations of masculinity with Gene, Donald and the teacher. Gene Kelly is representing a more alpha male so his dances moves have a stronger pace and energy while Donald seems more comedic with more graceful moves at times. The teacher is a more straight-laced guy with the clothes he is wearing and how he speaks. Each in their way is different but make for an interesting, well balanced caricature of the men during that time. 

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  1. How do the pre-dance movements of O’Connor and Kelly compare to their actual dance movements?  When they started quoting the tongue twister they were in sync and just carried that over into the dance.
     
  2. Watch the Professor all the way through and consider the role of the straight man.  I don't know how he managed to keep a straight face or not at least tap his toes.  I was smiling and tapping my feet just watching the clip, I would imagine I would be dancing along if were there.
     
  3. How do the representations of masculinity in all three men compare and contrast with each other?  Of course Kelly and O'Connor appeared very athletic in their dancing, the professor just seemed pompous, I guess masculine in his own way. 

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  1. How do the pre-dance movements of O’Connor and Kelly compare to their actual dance movements?
    Both O'Connor and Kelly are a bit cocky and very playful in the pre-dance.  As they recite the tongue-twister, they begin to bounce along to the rhythm and start to spin the Professor around, even before the music begins.  Once it does, there is a seamless transition to the dance; and the dance movements flow from the previous dialogue.  Brilliant!  I LOVE this number!  It has always been one of my favorites.
  2. Watch the Professor all the way through and consider the role of the straight man.
    The Professor is the quintessential straight man, who literally is straight and stiff throughout most of the song.  His job is to set up the comedic moments and allow them to be funny (in contrast to his deadpan face).  Without the Professor, the dance would not be as playful and fun.
  3. How do the representations of masculinity in all three men compare and contrast with each other?  Gene as Don Lockwood is definitely the Alpha male.  This is obvious when he dances as he generally stares straight ahead.  Although he is in sync with Donald O'Connor (Cosmo), if you placed your hand over Cosmo so that you could not see him, it would seem as though Gene/Don was just dancing independently.  Donald as Cosmo is the Beta male.  He frequently looks at Gene as he dances in both a supportive and "Good job, Buddy" type of way.  The Professor is the elegant, perhaps "old fashioned" type of male, who is stiff and definitely NOT fun.  It is an interesting statement made at the end of the dance where he is literally "trashed" and the vowel sign is placed upon him with a "Take this" attitude.  This is the old way.  Don't be like him.  Be young and vital is the message that shines through. 
  4.  

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1. Both of them have a casual, laid-back demeanor and O'Connor's antics behind the professor's back show his playful side. Their dancing is spontaneous and playful also, using many props in their dance.

2. He is very professional and proper. The way he holds the vocabulary book and gestures toward Kelly demonstrate a more feminine vibe than that of Kelly and O'Conner. Their manners are more masculine and their dancing is very athletic and fast. Gay men were not as accepted as straight men at this time so I think by making his persona a professor makes it more acceptable that his actions might be seen as distinguished and scholarly.

3. Kelly is there to be taught how to say his lines in a more formal manner since this film will be a talkie. Neither Kelly or O'Conner are fancy, but just regular guys. They think the professor is stuffy and full of himself, sounding ridiculous reciting the lines. The two friends work in tandem, kind of ganging up on the professor, who is submissive and doesn't stand up for himself.

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How do the pre-dance movements of O’Connor and Kelly compare to their actual dance movements?
 

As they gear up for delightful schoolboy mischief, the scene attracts the viewer by implementing an enactment of Moses Supposes while pulling in the professor as well. It no longer becomes an exercise of alliteration and rhyme. The tables are turned as they begin to bring the professor into a student role. As the scene progresses, Kelly and O’Connor continue to astond the audience on and off the screen into a fabulous tap of perfection. Those two aced this test. 

Watch the Professor all the way through and consider the role of the straight man.

I love how O’Connor mimics the professor in such a silly fashion. Right away the viewer knows they are going to take the lead and the professor hasn’t a chance. He becomes a rag doll, puppet even as Kelly shuffles him about in step. Piling everything on him. For me it was Slapstick Tap if there is such a thing. 

How do the representations of masculinity in all three men compare and contrast with each other?

O’Connor is very attentative in this clip. Watching as the middle man and praising the other two and then mimicing the professor as if childlike. Also he watches Kelly as they dance which shows his appreciation and dedication. The professor is prim and proper. Jolly old soul, reminds my of Rex Harrison. Kelly is the thinker and the designer of the scene as always. Wow....the leader. 

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1. I found they lined up extremely well, the entire routine was near perfection in every sense.

2. I imagine it must have been difficult to play it straight the whole but at the same instance enjoyable to watch two dance legends perform such a wonderful routine. 

3. In the film O'Conner is the comic relief and Kelly is the alpha male. I always found that even though Kelly was the alpha, he always played it very loose and fun. In this scene I felt that there was no lead male only two equal men performing an amazing routine together. The professor played the straight character which I mite add seemed to be a little stuck up. It was a small but essential part which also made Kelly and O'Conner look better and the professor was also in a way used as a prop for the two men.

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How do the pre-dance movements of O’Connor and Kelly compare to their actual dance movements? O'Connor is the funny man, making fun of the professor and Kelly is the smooth alpha male of the pair. They can move in rhythm to the beat of the desk drumming and thus into the music of the song. 
 

Watch the Professor all the way through and consider the role of the straight man. The professor is mainly the straight man and the old square to the hip duo of O'Connor and Kelly. He segueways into essentially a prop during the dance number.
 

How do the representations of masculinity in all three men compare and contrast with each other? The professor is the old square, uptight representation of the older , outdated male. O'Connor is a young, athletic Beta male that rejects the intellectualism of the past and is immature. Kelly is the cool, hip new Alpha male that rejects the societal norms of the older male and just wants to live for today.

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1.  When O'Connor starts teasing the professor little by little Kelly joins in until every action teasing him is synchronized, then when they're using their hands to tap on the the table they immediately start tap dancing.

2.  His role is to stay serious and he shows he is offended.  Although Kelly is taking the class seriously at first he joins in when O'Connor starts making fun of the professor.

3.  The professor is eccentric and has an air of superiority making him look not very masculine, Kelly is the Alpha male here and O'Connor the fun friend guy.  

 

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1. The pre dance moves of Kelly and O'Conner serve as a transition to the more fluid dance moves that are shown once the musical number really gets underway.

2. The professor services a great foil for the other two gentleman as he watches the fun and games from his much more intelligtual view point.

3. Kelly is the ultimate mans man masculine and confident while O'Conner is much more the mischief making sidekick and the professor is the snobby intellectual.

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1) I would say their pre dance was like a warm up, like it was setting us up for what was to come, its slow but to the rhythm of the music but then we see them actually dance. When they tap dance they move quick and fast to not only the beat but also the rhythm as if they are in sync from dancing on the floor to the chair to the desk, it all matches in quick sync to the way the music plays.

2) As I see the professor I see him as a man who is witty and cleaver, as maybe others see him as a lesser man, he is older, he is doesn't have a dance or sing, but he as he reads you can see the witty and humor in it as he talks to our two characters

3) With Don Lockwood (Gene Kelly) we see a very playful, outgoing and happy character. Even in the way he dances he's more energetic in the way he moves. While Cosmo Brown ( Donald O'Connor) he's more smooth, relaxed as he starts to sing with Don, And he seems Charismatic and the way he moves its also energetic but also controlled and as the professor, he doesn't dance or sing but he seems like an average joe other then being humorous and witty and just being himself. 

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Before O’Connor and Kelly segue into dancing they are in fairly casual standing positions. O’Connor has his arms folded in a relaxed way and Kelly has his hands in his pockets and chest more expanded. This body language helps to define their characters. O’Connor’s character is more in the background as a piano accompanist where as Kelly’s character is in the foreground of the public eye as a movie actor.

When O’Connor and Kelly dance they are very powerful, dynamic, energetic and in sync with each other. It is so exciting to watch. O’Connor appears lighter and springier in his dancing style than Kelly who is strong and somewhat heavy.

The Professor is stiff and proper with an eccentric passion for what he knows – the art of speaking and pronunciation. He acts as a contrast to the two younger characters that are more carefree, doing anything that they want; anything that feels right in the moment.

There are three different portrayals of masculinity in this clip. The Professor represents a man of duty with rules to follow.  Don Lockwood (Gene Kelly) reflects characteristics of the Alpha Male who is strong and assertive. Cosmo Brown (Donald O’Connor) is not quite as dominant as Lockwood and represents a slightly more subservient type male.

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1. How do the pre-dance movements of O’Connor and Kelly compare to their actual dance movements?

They are on the beat with their arm movements and speech inflections. Their rhythm flows straight into their fabulous dance number. It is a seamless transition. 

2. Watch the Professor all the way through and consider the role of the straight man.

The professor is in a state of mixed shock and confusion throughout the number. He wants everything done seriously, and does not know what to think when Kelly and O'Connor begin acting out. He becomes a prop in their number; especially at the end. 


3. How do the representations of masculinity in all three men compare and contrast with each other?

Kelly is the leader, O'Connor is the comic and initiator, and the professor is the stiff character who is overly proper. The professor is opposite of Kelly and O'Connor whereas Kelly and O'Connor play off of each other evenly. Each one leads in his own way throughout the number. Kelly's movements seem more athletic, and O'Connor's seem more acrobatic. With their different styles, the two dancers created one of my most favorite dance numbers, and one that the viewer can never grow weary of watching. 

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How do the pre-dance movements of O’Connor and Kelly compare to their actual dance movements?

Clearly, O'Connor is not taking the lesson seriously. It's all a clue that something much bigger is about to happen, he goes from mocking the teacher by making faces to having Gene Kelly join him. In the beginning of the clip they're two people moving and talking differently, then once the music starts they create a union and from then on they're in sync.

Watch the Professor all the way through and consider the role of the straight man.

The straight man is the source of amusement. His role is to contrast to the more sillier and mischevious by keeping a straight fact through the ordeal.

How do the representations of masculinity in all three men compare and contrast with each other?

Gene Kelly represents the more masculine man and it's only when he joins in that the silly scene turns into a singing- and dance number. O'Connor is the clown that starts everything off, he's playful and an obvious sidekick. The professor represents intelligence, he's the intellectual type but he's also square and stoic.

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The scene begins in middle shot, without Donald O'Connor's or Gene Kelly's legs in view. O'Connor is marking off the beat of the text with his head and his hands. As we move into the song, the camera moves out so that we see O'Connor and Kelly dancing with their whole bodies.

it's interesting that the studio is sending both Don Lockwood and Lina Lamont to to elocution lessons. Lena obviously needs help, but why is Don here?

Before the fifties, American actors were often encouraged to speak with a "mid-Atlantic" accent. https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/how-a-fake-british-accent-took-old-hollywood-by-storm This was particularly true at MGM, which was seen as the "classy" studio (Ars Gratia Artis and all that). In the post-war period, Hollywood promotes the authentically American accents of its talent.

Kelly shows that he can pick up on what the coach is teaching him and then goes back to speaking with his normal voice.

Don's hapless voice coach becomes the butt of the joke not so much because he's trying to improve Don's speech, but because he reflects a clichéd idea of what good speech with its "round tones" and clipped endings.

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  1. Singin in the Rain has been one of my favorite movie musicals since I was a kid and I could easily say that I’ve watched it almost a 100 times and never tire of it.  There is such playfulness in this movie.  And, you can imagine how the early pictures went and how difficult it was to coordinate everything.  
I’m wishing and wanting more time spent in this class talking about who created the music and choreography for these numbers.  They are pure magic!!  I realize this class is short but rather than focusing entirely on the performers, I would love to know the background as well.
  1. 1.  How do the pre-dance movements of O’Connor and Kelly compare to their actual dance movements?  The pre-movements are setting the stage for what it is to come.. the segue for the viewer to follow into the dance and song moves.  This is an amazing number!!  How did they do it and in complete synchronization!!  Amazing!!
     
  2. 2.Watch the Professor all the way through and consider the role of the straight man. He is awesome!!   the look on his face without being overly done... like uh oh... who did I just get as pupils?  The playfulness of this routine is incredible.  You get the feeling that Don and Cosmo are tired of these classes and poking fun in such a good humored way. 
  3.  
  4. 3.  How do the representations of masculinity in all three men compare and contrast with each other?  For sure Don Lockwood is the charmer and star.  He’s confident, they way he carries himself before he even open his mouth.  Cosmo is always the one in this film making things light and keeping them laughing and not taking it too seriously.  The professor is the complete nerdy fellow... just doing his job.  

Really one of the most creative numbers, son, dance of all time!!

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1.  In MY opinion, the Pre-Dance movements of O’Connor and Kelly actually made them perform the Comedic elements in this segment.  On the other hand their actual Dance movements made them perform the Main elements of this segment.

2.  Also, in MY opinion, the Professor, supposedly served as the role of the straight man, actually switched this role's Function from the Straight Man during the Pre-Dance movements performed by O'Connor & Kelly to the Comic Relief and the Representative on behalf of the Audience during the Dance Movements performed by O'Connor & Kelly!

3.  The Professor is supposedly to be the Authority, but he is older now, can't always put Young Ones, i.e. O'Connor & Kelly, under his control.  O'Connor's role is more like a Young Beta or "Average Joe" while Kelly's role is the Young Alpha, being Strong to Lead!  Look at O'Connor, he goes along with the other Two's movements and having fun on his own but NOT to The Professor's face.  Kelly, on the other hand, takes what he's Learnt from The Professor to apply and to challenge The Professor!

LOVE This Film!

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The pre-dance movements of Kelly and O'Connor lead us right into the dance scene, not really separate from each other. They're playful, not serious about the lesson. As they joke around in the pre-dance, we see O'Connor making faces and then Kelly joining in on the fun. They're also in sync with each other and even more so as they sing and dance. Donald O'Connor is wonderful and so humorous in this scene. It all seems natural as he's making faces behind the professor and into the song and dance sequence. 

Poor professor, being made fun of throughout this scene. But sometimes the straight guy is the funniest. Watching Donald O'Connor making faces behind his back is very funny, but it's hilarious that the professor keeps reading and never catches O'Connor in the act. We don't have to hear the professor say anything to them, it's his actions that make the scene more entertaining.

In comparison to each other, I guess it's the clothing that defines their masculinity. The professor is wearing a suit and O'Connor and Kelly are wearing bold color sweaters. Safe masculine clothing. There's more of a noticeable contrast between the three. We have the intellectual professor, even if he is being made fun of. We also have two students although Kelly would be considered the more masculine of the two. He's the focus of the professor's teaching and is the one watching as Donald O'Connor makes the jokes. Kelly only joins in later. We also see he's the dominate in the one part where he is standing in the chair with the curtain draped around him (A Roman stance) as opposed to O'Connor kneeling on the floor. But while Kelly can be seen as the masculine of the three, O'Connor as the secondary is the one that really steals this scene. Yes he's the one not taking the lesson seriously, but looking at it from the audience's point of view, he is the one leading things.

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1. How do the pre-dance movements of O’Connor and Kelly compare to their actual dance movements?

Their movements are already bouncing in rhythm with the words and phrases they are all saying, as if they are already moving their hands warming up for the upcoming song and dance scene. 

 

2. Watch the Professor all the way through and consider the role of the straight man.

The straight man in this scene is the Professor.  The two "pupils" play off of him well, with the Professor the essence of seriousness and propriety not knowing the other two are playful poking fun at his lesson.  He even congratulates himself when O'Conner bids him to say another, thinking they are actually taking each lesson with the feeling and fervor he is portraying.  I think his actions highlight the other two, giving them the perfect setting to make light of the situation.

 

3. How do the representations of masculinity in all three men compare and contrast with each other?

The Professor is rigid and straight laced, unaccustomed to having fun or relaxing among any group of people it seems. He is masculine but in a way which appears uncomfortable with how a man should be, not knowing how to handle the situation the two are presenting to him.  Don (Kelly) is the alpha male -- strong, in control of the situation and his surroundings and able to laugh at himself and whats going on about him.  He is athletic and handsome.  Cosmo (O'Conner) is the beta male and comedic relief in any given situation.  His appearance is slighter than that of the Male Lead (Kelly) and his mannerisms are even bordering on effeminate, taking on a softer and flowery approach at times when he does things.  The ensemble performs well in this scene together, playing off the straight laced Professor as they have some fun while practicing diction.

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In this clip from Singin' in the Rain, O'Connor and Kelly's pre-dance movements set the tone for the rhythm and synchronicity to come during the dance routine. Their movements have a comical appeal and show us that it's them against the Professor, the straight man here. Their antics with the curtains and the chair and O'Connor's making faces behind the Professor's back all foreshadow the hilarious and tragic end for the Professor.

As seen with the Professor, the straight man becomes little more than a prop, used by the stars as a means to showcase their talents as comedians as well as amazing dancers. The stars play off of his stern demeanor and stiff posture, which contrast their own lighthearted attitude and flexible movements. 

Gene Kelly is the alpha male, the most powerful of the three. His presence is strong and commanding. O'Connor is a close second, a bit shyer but still in control, unlike the Professor who is a meek pawn in their game. He is the epitome of the more conservative conformist of the 1950s male. 

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  1. How do the pre-dance movements of O’Connor and Kelly compare to their actual dance movements?    They clearly are preparing the audience for something big. O’Connor starts it off and Kelly mirrors his movements, first in how they speak and then in how they move the professor around. Cosmo even starts the dancing while Don tries to maintain his cool, apathetic manner, but then Kelly takes his obvious lead and really gets into it and ratchets up the number.

 

2. Watch the Professor all the way through and consider the role of the straight man. The Professor does a fabulous job playing the straight man in this scene. He is so excited and happy with himself while demonstrating the tongue twisters, and then by the end he is totally resigned to what is happening. He allows himself to be led around and man handled, and then he sits back resignedly as if saying, “is this seriously happening right now?”. 
 

3. How do the representations of masculinity in all three men compare and contrast with each other?    Kelly is the obvious alpha male in this scene, O’Connor is the beta male, and the professor is the tertiary character foil. You can see in their dress how Gene Kelly is less buttoned up, more relaxed. Donald O’Connor wears a tie and appears a bit more formal. When Kelly takes the lead in the dancing, he asserts his dominance yet also gives O’Connor room to shine. Their dance styles are completely different, Kelly’s being more athletic and forceful, O’Connor’s lighter and more comical, but they complement each other perfectly. The professor is just sitting there waiting and then when they bring him back into the dance, they both are dominant over him and he lets them do what they will.

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