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DAILY DOSE OF DELIGHT #13 (From GYPSY)

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1. In what ways does this scene look backwards to classical musicals and how does it look ahead to new disruptions that we now know will happen in the movie musical?

This scene reflects back to classical musicals in the sense of its inclusion of the stage performance reminiscent of vaudeville and theatrical broadway musical acts. It also involves the behind the stage concept, costuming, music and process of the earlier musicals.

Looking forward, it showcases the youthful acts over seasoned pros. The wardrobe of Russell’s is on par with the timeline of the 60’s and the film is shot in color. The resignation of Karl Malden in the scene is a foreshadowing of moving on from the current status quo.

2. This is the introduction of Mama Rose in the film. Comment on Rosalind Russell’s entrance and performance especially as a traditionally trained stage and film actress.

Russell’s demanding performance is definitely over the top as much as she was, if not more, than in Auntie Mame. Her enunciation, projection and larger-than-life animation with over-stepping delivery of her brash dialogue signals the tell tale signs of stage training, perfect for the character of Mama Rose.

3. Pay attention to the song “Let Me Entertain You” in this scene. Is there anything you notice in Sondheim’s lyrics that are sly, subversive, or edgy? You can also discuss the song’s performance and staging as disruptive (or not).

In the context of its presentation within the scene, not particularly. Although, I notice that the disruptive areas I’ve noticed come from the loose dance choreography and offset vocals.

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The style of the music in this film is different from the classical hits, especially with Gypsy Lee Rose and her burlesque days and Baby June and her performance high kicks. 


Mama Rose was the splitting image of Mom-Manager, making her voice and appearance known to all and not let anyone try to step on her. Her entrance is grand and so is her exit. She makes her presence known, she steps over everyone in her path and corrects them to her views only. When she gets what she wants, then she is satisfied, but when you cross Mama Rose, the n the steamroller comes out. Mama always had a dream, as seen in the film and since she couldn't shine during her peak years, she brought out her two daughters Baby/Dainty June and Louise in the act and made them stars. Unfortunately they both didn't want to be what Mama has out for them and create their own persona in their individual acts (highly sophisticated stripe tease and an actress in films).

 

The song can be taken any way the listeners want to take it. Whether it as a way to lift one's spirits or as a sexual subtext. Especially at the beginning of the film with Baby June singing to the audience entering in to their homes and hearts by entertaining them in a playful way, while near the end when Gypsy Lee enters burlesque and she sings the song with tease and class. The song meaning starts to change from happy to seductress and tease dance number. 

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1. In what ways does this scene look backwards to classical musicals and how does it look ahead to new disruptions that we now know will happen in the movie musical?

This scene looks backwards to early musicals first and foremost in the staging. Early musicals were often staged as a live theatre performance would be staged, with the audience looking in on the action. It also hearkens back to classic musicals with the show within a show mentality, but looks forward in the subject matter. Mama Rose is probably one of the most disruptive characters in musical theatre history, and she does not disappoint in this scene as she not only interrupts but takes over in an attempt to make her children win and be seen as the best.

2. This is the introduction of Mama Rose in the film. Comment on Rosalind Russell’s entrance and performance especially as a traditionally trained stage and film actress.

Like everything she does, Mama Rose’s entrance is one to remember. It’s forceful, unyielding, and Russell truly makes use of and commands the “stage”. Her big, booming voice and stage presence seem to make the others sharing it with her cower in awe of her. Part of this is the character, of course, but she is able to transition the stage and film together in a way that makes her come off as a formidable person who is not to be messed with.

3. Pay attention to the song “Let Me Entertain You” in this scene. Is there anything you notice in Sondheim’s lyrics that are sly, subversive, or edgy? You can also discuss the song’s performance and staging as disruptive (or not).

Ive always enjoyed this song, and often find it stuck in my head. While the song is sung here by June, the lyrics and the performance both foreshadow what is to come for Louise as she grows into what would become Gypsy Rose Lee. The performance and lyrics are questionable for a young girl, but as has been stressed in this course and is so very important, we must view the films as products of their time and also as products of the times they’re depicting. 

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  1. In what ways does this scene look backwards to classical musicals and how does it look ahead to new disruptions that we now know will happen in the movie musical?  I think it looks backwards to the backstage musicals in that the characters are auditioning for a part in a vaudeville type show.  I think the disruption is that it's not a full blown 40's or 50's musical with elaborate sets and costumes.  Or glamorous people in the audience. 
     
  2. This is the introduction of Mama Rose in the film. Comment on Rosalind Russell’s entrance and performance especially as a traditionally trained stage and film actress.  First I have to say I love Rosalind Russell!   The way she comes bounding in is reminiscent of her character in Auntie Mame.  I have seen probably all her movies and am so impressed that she can play any role very well, comedy, straight, you name it.
     
  3. Pay attention to the song “Let Me Entertain You” in this scene. Is there anything you notice in Sondheim’s lyrics that are sly, subversive, or edgy? You can also discuss the song’s performance and staging as disruptive (or not). At first I didn't really think anything about it.  But when I look at June's make-up, her bloomers showing, and the other children in various states of dress, I wonder if the code was enforced for kids.  Seems like the stage mothers were living vicariously through their children.  I also thought the same thing as the poster above, that Jon-Benet Ramsey looked a lot like June. 

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In what ways does this scene look backwards to classical musicals and how does it look ahead to new disruptions that we now know will happen in the movie musical?

  • It looks back via the time-honored tradition of "The Audition" where "ya gotta show 'em what ya got. It is future-forward as one of the earliest of what would soon be a deluge of big screen musicals adapted from Broadway plays.

This is the introduction of Mama Rose in the film. Comment on Rosalind Russell’s entrance and performance especially as a traditionally trained stage and film actress.

  • Coming from the stage, Russell knows how its done: loud, proud and in your face.

Pay attention to the song “Let Me Entertain You” in this scene. Is there anything you notice in Sondheim’s lyrics that are sly, subversive, or edgy? You can also discuss the song’s performance and staging as disruptive (or not).

  • Well, I don't know about subversive. I do note the changes for the kiddie version vs. what will be heard later in the film. Kiddie: "I will do some kicks." Adult Stripper: "I will do some tricks." Either way, ya gotta be versatile.

 

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In what ways does this scene look backwards to classical musicals and how does it look ahead to new disruptions that we now know will happen in the movie musical?

We have the vaudeville setting with performances on a stage and someone that interrupts. A pushy parent comes through and makes sure her children gets all the spotlight. The colors are sort of earthy and nothing really stands out except for the balloons. Since I have not watched the film I don't know what will happen aside from what I've read about it and seen from this clip, and I'm thinking that when the balloon pops at the end, it's a wake up call, sort of. A prenumition to what the future might look like for the girls.

This is the introduction of Mama Rose in the film. Comment on Rosalind Russell’s entrance and performance especially as a traditionally trained stage and film actress.

Oh, she just demands attention! She barges in and takes over, barking orders and she certainly knows how to spit out her lines.

Pay attention to the song “Let Me Entertain You” in this scene. Is there anything you notice in Sondheim’s lyrics that are sly, subversive, or edgy? You can also discuss the song’s performance and staging as disruptive (or not).

The lyrics definitely has double meaning depending on who sings it - if it's a child it gives them a more innocent vibe while an adult singing the song comes off more suggestive. The staging is disruptive, probably so the song won't be heard as clearly and it won't give the audience time to really reflect over the lyrics.

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1.     This scene looks backwards in the way it has a vaudeville-ish performance when the two girls dance so animated and that they are performing individually like the 1940’s performers did. It seems to look ahead when Russell begins to put demands on the director and lighting crew.  She, as a female, is being in charge which is the attitude of female performers to come.

2.    I feel Russell’s entrance was very theatrical with lots of drama and quick talking. Her appearance was set up so she would look very important, with the brief case and dog in hand, which allowed her to be a bit intimidating to the director.

3.    I noticed that the lyrics  were a bit suggestive at the words, “let me make you smile” and “I’ll tell you a story”…what kind of story makes you smile, right??  

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1. Gypsy Rose Lee spits in the face of Hollywood code of the 1930s, and yet the beginning of this movie still feels like a Backstage Musical like back in the 42nd Street or even For Me and My Gal days. Because GRL is definitely not "code" material, a movie about her life is glaringly blazing into the future - where things aren't so risque and dangerous but are right out in front of you in bold Technicolor.

2. Rosalind Russell is a gem and I love her. Is that enough of an answer? No? Here we go - 
Rosalind Russell has every move down. She knows where the camera is, knows how to play to it, and knows her stardom is as big as ever as she makes her entrance. She controls every step, every line. She's familiar with the stage, so stepping up to defend her daughters means not only playing to the camera, but playing to the "audience" before the stage. It lends Mama Rose a realism, since she was someone who has been in vaudeville for so long. She's not a woman who will turn her back on the front of the stage, but twist and spin so she's always cheating out.

Mama Rose comes in big and bold, and the whole scene depicts just who exactly we're dealing with. She forces one man to quit, kicks a little girl off stage, drops names or connections in any way possible, and completely takes control of the entire audition. Not many actresses could have pulled this off as big and bold as Ms. Russell.

3. The song has already been pointed out as having lyrics with double meaning, and others have mentioned the girls dressed up in makeup (hint hint at their future), but what struck me most was, during this whole scene, it was the girl with the most clothes on and the least amount of over-adultized makeup that was being pushed off the stage. The girl in the balloons is shunted aside as more mature looking little girls are given more attention. 

Even the way June sings lines "I will do some kicks" and kicks her leg up to her ears - much like flashy can-can dancers used to do for men back in the old west. And Louise IS going to be the one doing tricks. It's like it's all foreshadowing to what will become of Louise, all while their mother steals the spotlight and distracts all the attention. For Louise, the song is almost a swan song without her knowing it. "Let me entertain you, because if you don't notice me, eventually I'll have to take drastic steps to make you see me."

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1. It's got a vaudeville variety act feel that was so common in early musicals.

2. She barges right in no holds barred, very much a classic stage mother.

3. It slightly edgy but really depends on how you read into the lyrics, and the setting of it.

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1. In terms of "backwards," the "kiddie talent show" auditions for Uncle Jocko/Herbie (Karl Malden) would be reminiscent of vaudeville performance acts of the vaudeville era.

2. I think Rosalind Russell makes a bold, yet commanding entrance for her characterization of Mama Rose in this scene for "Gypsy."  Perhaps her characterization of the title role of "Auntie Mame" Dennis in Warners' 1958 film of the same name ("Auntie Mame") may have propelled her to play the role of Mama Rose in "Gypsy" in the film.

3. While I do enjoy "Gypsy" (1962), I believe that the "Let Me Entertain You" number would be too risque and creepy for a young child to sing (Suzanne Cupito/Morgan Brittany's characterization of 'Baby' June during the audition performance).

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In what ways does this scene look backwards to classical musicals and how does it look ahead to new disruptions that we now know will happen in the movie musical?

Well, we're puttin' on a show! Vibrant colors. As to disruption, I'm having a hard time with this concept. I guess the one thing about it are the lyrics, which we all know where "Let me entertain you" goes in Gypsy Rose Lee's life. That pushed the envelope a tad.
 

This is the introduction of Mama Rose in the film. Comment on Rosalind Russell’s entrance and performance especially as a traditionally trained stage and film actress.

From the moment Rosalind Russell enters, everything else become secondary. She's loud, crude, seriously lacking in sincerity. No class. Epitome of stage mother. She's wonderful. She belts her lines out like a ham actor, which she's not. 
 

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  1. In what ways does this scene look backwards to classical musicals and how does it look ahead to new disruptions that we now know will happen in the movie musical? Now when a show does auditions for a musical they always do it one on one and not with a group of people (such as later on in A Chorus Line)
     
  2. This is the introduction of Mama Rose in the film. Comment on Rosalind Russell’s entrance and performance especially as a traditionally trained stage and film actress.  Mama Rose is now the typical "stage mom" we now see in films/tv shows. Where the Mother is trying to live out her daughter's talent by trying to make her look perfect but really making her daughter look awful.
  3.  
  4. Pay attention to the song “Let Me Entertain You” in this scene. Is there anything you notice in Sondheim’s lyrics that are sly, subversive, or edgy? You can also discuss the song’s performance and staging as disruptive (or not).  Like many other people have said how the song is preformed and by who can change the meaning of the words just like that....a quick personal (edited) story I went to Vegas this year and went to a burlesque show and they made common songs sound as sexy songs.

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I think Gypsy looks backward to classic Hollywood musicals in the use of children, signaling hope and good humor. Baby June was clearly a savvy performer. She was ready to put it on the line whenever her mother said, Dum de de um pum pum. Louise was the person not very talented, but doing her best. I also thought the film clip was good for a ll ages. It looks forward to cultural more's changing because we know that Louise will become Gypsy Rose Lee. 

Rosalind Russell owns the screen from her first call out to Louise. She appears quite tall, and she was slender, and dressed in fur. She told everyone what they should be doing and even tried a little bad publicity for the theater if her girls weren't chosen. She wasn't asking for a chance, but a verdict in their favor. In a way, her dialogue over the voices of everyone else reminds me of the 3-cushion dialogue used in screwball comedies. Fast and right over someone else's words!

I don't get the disruption in the Sondheim lyrics at this point because it's clear the children are doing kicks and tricks, but, you can't imagine the children in a Garland/Rooney movie being hustled off the stage and not treated with adult reverence. These poor kids, all of them in the line, were just like little puppies waiting for their chance to be petted.

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1. In what ways does this scene look backwards to classical musicals and how does it look ahead to new disruptions that we now know will happen in the movie musical?

The vaudeville setting is the standby scene from classical musicals as is the kids auditioning to put on a show. The producer is there as well as the on-stage presenter. It's a little seedier looking than most classic musicals which more fondly remembered vaudeville. Usually the main actor(s) showed some talent but the two little girls are not that great with one (Louise) pretty bad indeed. The entrance of Rose is a disruption in itself as she tries to take over the entire proceedings. This is a different kind of mother figure than what we have seen before - pushy, loud mouthed and not to be ignored.  The burst balloon offstage - an act against a child  - is an element I don't think we would have seen in earlier musicals (by an adult and a mother-figure).
 

2. This is the introduction of Mama Rose in the film. Comment on Rosalind Russell’s entrance and performance especially as a traditionally trained stage and film actress.

Russell's entrance is disruptive and the action quickly focuses on her actions and words. She portrays a force of nature determined to push her kids to the spotlight. She is quick-witted (as most of Russell's characterizations always were) and ready to do battle.
 

3. Pay attention to the song “Let Me Entertain You” in this scene. Is there anything you notice in Sondheim’s lyrics that are sly, subversive, or edgy? You can also discuss the song’s performance and staging as disruptive (or not).

The lyrics have double meanings depending on who is singing, where they are singing it, and how they are attired. Child to hopeful vaudevillians to young stripper to professional.

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1. The scene looks back in time to who has the most money and controls what people should enjoy, it is vaudeville. It also looks forward to who the manager or director has a relationship with gets the job or the time on stage. When Rose walks in she takes over saying everything to be in control and get her daughters the main leads. Funny that she becomes romantically involved with Uncle Joko. 

  1. Rose definitely is building a relationship by saying "Are you an ELK?". The Mom is a total take control and it is all about us. She is also constantly talking and walking around the stage, managing everyone and calling out the problems. We need a spot light on baby June and how the music needs to be played for the entrance. She is a true stage Mother and professional. I just love her walking off the stage following the balloon girl with a fork. 
     
  2. The song is vampy and suggests that I am the only one who can entertain. We should be the only ones on stage. When a child sings the song it is playful and fun, with not to dark under tones. 

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  1. It looks back as it’s literally on the stage, with the proscenium and vaudeville as framing devices. It looks ahead as the song, while seemingly for the stage, is really making a story point. It explains so much about June’s upbringing, her family dynamic, and her commitment to putting on a show that continues throughout her life.
  2. She owns the stage. When you see this show performed, the show almost always stops for applause at, “sing out Louise!” Here, there’s no pause for a reaction—Russell is simply barreling ahead, spitting out dialogue at a rapid clip, overtaking all the men and children around her—basically a human steamroller. Yet you like her immediately. There’s still that twinkle in her eye, and that determination to charm. It’s interesting in that perhaps her most famous role, as Auntie Mame, plays so much like a musical (and plays so much better than the musical version, Mame). It’s one of my favorite films, and Russell is why.
  3. I never really thought there was anything edgy about it. I guess because it’s performed by a child, or perhaps because I’ve heard the song since I was young that anything sly went over my head. As performed here, with two, not-so-talented tots, it doesn’t seem to mean much. Yet I appreciate the discussion of the changes to the lyrics and how they have changed on the screen and stage.

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1. In what ways does this scene look backwards to classical musicals and how does it look ahead to new disruptions that we now know will happen in the movie musical?

It looks backwards in that it highlights the formula for many classic studio musicals, the production and behind the scenes which made up much of the plot -- putting on a show and finding the star for that show!  Plus it focuses on something that was rampant back in the day of the big studios running things when they would do a casting call in search of the next big child star (ala Judy Garland or Shirley Temple).

 

2. This is the introduction of Mama Rose in the film. Comment on Rosalind Russell’s entrance and performance especially as a traditionally trained stage and film actress.

From the moment Mama Rose enters, all eyes go to her and stay on her really.  It seems that the attention she wants for Baby June and Co. is the attention she wishes for herself, which is the case with many stage mothers I believe.  One can almost surmise from her forceful entry and her take control attitude that she might have been raised in the business/seeking stardom herself but chose marriage and family, only to pass on her aspirations for stardom to her children. Rosalind Russell does a phenomenal job as this character, using her acting chops to really control the mood, tempo and visuals of the whole scene.

 

3. Pay attention to the song “Let Me Entertain You” in this scene. Is there anything you notice in Sondheim’s lyrics that are sly, subversive, or edgy? You can also discuss the song’s performance and staging as disruptive (or not).

Sung by a child the song is just fun and bubbly, innocent and fun.  Now it if were sung by an adult with a sultry soft voice, and in a costume to accentuate an hour glass figure?  That song turns into something flirty, promising and titillating!   The let me make you smile and the trick lines, those seem to be very edgy/risque given the proper setting. I suppose what might be disruptive would be the song itself, as its sort of hinting at sexuality ("every move has a meaning all its own") and some of the children in the background seem scantily clad, perhaps hinting at what is to come (or what happened sometimes behind the scenes during the big studio days).  The burgeoning age of sex is hinted and pushed here, which seems disruptive in regards to the old school musicals and the formulas used back in the day.

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  1. In what ways does this scene look backwards to classical musicals and how does it look ahead to new disruptions that we now know will happen in the movie musical?
    The scene looks backwards to classical musicals by involving the stage, much like "Broadway Melody of 1929.  It also includes children auditioning and calls back to the days of Shirley Temple, Judy Garland, and Deanna Durbin.  However, this scene is a bit grittier than the classic musicals and the lighting appears a little darker to me.  It shows the seedier side of backstage life in a more realistic way than the backstage scenes in "Yankee Doodle Dandy," for example.
  2. This is the introduction of Mama Rose in the film. Comment on Rosalind Russell’s entrance and performance especially as a traditionally trained stage and film actress.  Russell's entrance is loud and boisterous.  She is a character that commands attention and gets what she wants, which is for her daughter's to attain a level of success that she did not achieve.  Mama Rose knows the ropes and knows that the stage is not for the shrinking violets of the world.  She also seems to know that she must be loud to get the attention of the males running the show.  She has to be as strong or stronger than they are to make her point.  
     
  3. Pay attention to the song “Let Me Entertain You” in this scene. Is there anything you notice in Sondheim’s lyrics that are sly, subversive, or edgy? You can also discuss the song’s performance and staging as disruptive (or not).  Oh my, yes.  "Let me entertain you, let me make you smile...I'm very versatile."  It is interesting that when sung by Baby June as a youngster, the song seems more innocent, as in, "I am here to entertain you -- look at me."  (Like if Gene Kelly had had the opportunity to sing it).  However, when sung by a grown up Gypsy, the lyrics take on a very sexual meaning, as in "I am here to entertain you, but in an entirely adult, sexual way, and I'm happy to do so." 

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In what ways does this scene look backwards to classical musicals and how does it look ahead to new disruptions that we now know will happen in the movie musical?

  • It looks back by having bright colors, and they are auditioning for a show.  The audition gets interrupted by Mama Rose.  She takes over.  The producer and director are not really sure what to do.  

This is the introduction of Mama Rose in the film. Comment on Rosalind Russell’s entrance and performance especially as a traditionally trained stage and film actress.

  • You can tell Mama Rose gets her way.  She is a strong character who is virtually pushing her daughters to the front of the pack.  She even pushes the little balloon girl with her wand.  She commands the stage!  I think it might be afraid of her.  LOL  

Pay attention to the song “Let Me Entertain You” in this scene. Is there anything you notice in Sondheim’s lyrics that are sly, subversive, or edgy? You can also discuss the song’s performance and staging as disruptive (or not).

  • A little girl is singing it but it seems like a song for an adult.  Not a child.  The staging is difficult for me because there are so many people and so much going on, it is hard to focus on it.  Especially when Mama starts speaking over everyone.  

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1. If you look backwards to classical musicals you have cute and innocent kids, like Shirley Temple, trying to become the next big star, but  it's only because their parents are forcing them to.

2. She comes in immediately telling her daughter what to do acting like she is the director and in charge of everything.

3. The words in the song can be taken in different not so innocent ways, but because it is children signing the words might accidentally interpreted as innocent. 

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This scene is reminiscent of the to “backstage” musicals and vaudeville. The premise and costumes reflect the earlier movies in the beginning of the musical age. It was disruptive of the Code and looks ahead to how more risqué performances will be common in the coming years, and musical genre othe will seem to meld over time.

Rosalind Russell’s entrance draws all attention to herself, even taking away from her girls - mainly baby June and begins ordering musicians and lighting. She is singleminded headstrong and rolls over anyone who would interfere. She is an over the top stage mother.

The song “Let Me Entertain You” in this scene has the innocence from a young girl performance, but with the double meaning may lead to an underlying innuendo that would be suggestive to adults, while being virtually unknown to the child singing and entertaining the audience. 

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  1. The scene looks backwards when the staging has kids involved standing in the background while the kid performer does her act. The people are walking around the stage while the performance is going on, but it’s clear that it’s just a rehearsal where you see the audition and criticism play out. What seems like a look into vaudeville having a more lively and family-friendly atmosphere  common in the 1930s musicals, is actually a different viewpoint where it’s more brash, mean-spirited, and burlesque even on the kid range. It’s transition from the previous musicals was meant to add in the realism than the fantasy to see what show business is like that can be cut throating and stressful than how they used to portray to be relevant in the 60s when musicals are slowly losing interests.
     
  2. Mama Rose has an assertive personality, so her entrance went full force to being a supporter to the girl’s performance. She barges in to compromise and shout orders on the stage director and crew and the producer to convince them that she makes a worthwhile performer than the birthday balloon girl for her looks. She makes it clear that she knows her game and skills and expects them to judge the audition based on merit and performance than just looks.
     
  3. The song has some sexual innuendo or double entendre lyrics describing the singer as a stripper attracting the male audience. For a girl to sing it seem to be not acceptable today for inappropriate reasons. As stated in the first question, it has a lot going that doesn’t feel like an actual performance as it’s meant to see how an actual rehearsal or audition would play out then a much linear ideal practice as if everything’s going swell all the time with minor differences.

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1) It's stage setting and classic music are a look back to classic musicals.  The dialogue over the music is a disruption.

2) She comes in bold and basically steals the show. 

3)Having children sing "Let me entertain you" was probably pretty edgy for the time period. 

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1.  Shouldn't THIS be considered the Most Iconic Presentation for all the aggressive mothers, throughout the decades in the modern history, pushing their children to fulfil the dreams on some kind of stage, e.g. show business, beauty pageant, ... etc., these mothers can't achieve and even to make a living out of their children's hard works and sufferings?!

     Unsure why the video clip we watch here is considered "backwards to classical musicals".  Sure, the story is set in the early 1920s, and of course, rich people would NOT send their children to audition for vaudeville circuits.  So, if the "Backwards" is about the Behaviours and the Dialogues of these characters, the Costumes and the Set in this clip, then I disagree on the question based on the Nature of the story.

     Or, it's the sound and visual presentations of this film?  This film is about the Nitty-Gritty of the Vaudeville Audition with a bunch of children to perform back in the 1920s, Neither the Glamour Nor the Sophistication of Broadway or Film Audition with adults and young adults as in some other films we have watched throughout this course.  Yes, the film was made & released in 1962 with more advanced technologies.  But, it does give a feel of the 1920s!

2.  Well, since the character of Mama Rose is an aggressive mother, she enters the scene Disruptively.  What A Big Entrance:  She is Loud from the opposite direction which is NOT even in the scene, but you can hear her Loud & Clear before you even actually see her!  After her entering the scene, she is Non-Stop in motion, in action.  She takes over the stage, keeps on talking and commanding, moving around, and moving others around.  She Owns the Stage Now!  You are "forced" to pay attention Only to HER.  You Cannot ignore Her!

     As to the actress Rosalind Russell, who portrayed "Mama Rose", she had not Only lots of acting experiences prior to this film "Gypsy" with Broadway & Theatre, but also "voice lessons" for Opera.  Since she was Never considered as A Sex Symbol, she could signed up for various types of characters, i.e. NOT just Only the classy and glamourous roles.  Thus, I'd think it was an advantage for her NOT to be Stereotyped as a One-Dimensional actress.  Audience could buy in her character and performance directly!

3.  I did NOT think if the Lyrics as "sly, subversive, or edgy" as the two girls's performance.  at this time in the story, these two girls are NOT sophisticated on the stage ... Yet.  They just do what they are told by their mother, NOT fulling knowing the impacts of their performance and their mother's aggressive behaviours.  However, the the argument between the adults in charge is about either Talent or Pre-Arranged agreement while their mother bossing everybody at the scene around.

     I mean, in this clip, I feel the Lyrics are NOT as Disruptive as the two girls performing under their bossy mother's command!

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