BunnyWhit

Animated Musical Favorites

36 posts in this topic

We’ve spent three weeks sharing our favorite (and not so favorite) musicals, singers and dancers, even individual musical numbers. Now, how about a shout out to our favorite purely celluloid friends and favorites.

I’m going to have to go with Fantasia (1940) as my favorite animated musical. Any of you who’ve seen it won’t have to ask why. Any of you who’ve not seen it — see it!

Favorite sing-along-able number might just be “I Wan’na Be Like You” from The Jungle Book (1967) because Louis Prima is the man. He swings even when he’s not trying to.

Favorite guilty pleasure animated must be The Aristocats (1970) because “Ev’rybody Wants to Be a Cat”. It’s the fabulous Phil Harris, Scatman Crothers, Thurl Ravenscroft, Al Rinker, and Liz English.

 

 

 

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There are so many to choose from.  But I went crazy over this.  The fabulous Jerry Orbach and the flatware's entertaining.  I could easily choose several others from this film -- the title song or "Gaston"

 

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This might not count for some people, but I have to say Rankin-Bass' "Santa Claus is Coming to Town".

 

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I totally forgot about the animated musicals! My favorites are the Beauty and The Beast and Fantasia. Loved watching Be Our Guest from Beauty and the Beast, thanks for posting that.Love some of the Christmas ones also. A favorite Christmas one is Rudolph with the little elf who wanted to be a dentist!

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1 hour ago, corinne54 said:

Every Christmas I looked forward to seeing Mr. Magoo's Christmas Carol. I especially identified with "I'm All Alone in the World" 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b7qOFB4IXA8

 

I was deprived as a child. The night Mr. Magoo aired my parents went out and left me with a babysitter. My mother told her my bedtime was to be strictly observed. I got to watch the first half and then it was bedtime. The babysitter wouldn't be budged. That was the last Christmas before went to Germany and the last chance I had to see it for many years. By then I was grown with a child of my own and we watched it together. And I let him stay up past his bedtime to see the end!

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Fantasia was fantastic! Fantasia 2000 not as much. And what a great way to expose children and even adults to classical music they otherwise would never hear. 

But my favorite is Snow White. When I was in college the one movie theater in the small college town was showing it. My sister and nephew, who was around 4, came to visit for the weekend and we went to see it. I think that may have been the first time I saw it, and I know it was the first time I saw it on the big screen.

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My favorite’s The Lion King. Lots of great different songs in there. Here’s two of my favorites:

As for a more classical musical, I feel that Alice in Wonderland is pretty underrated. The songs are short, but still pretty good. For example, “‘Twas Brillig” by Sterling Holloway (who in general was a pretty underrated singer):

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=KxxuVhq6MZA

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Alice in Wonderland may be my favorite Disney film (as if my avatar didn't already tip everyone off), but I admit that its role as a musical is very incidental. Most of the songs are 30 seconds long and randomly pop in and out of the dialogue purely for entertainment rather than any storytelling purpose.

My favorite animated musical is actually The Hunchback of Notre Dame. It's the most sophisticated score and songbook the studio's ever done. Every number has so many layers to it and contributes a great deal to both the plot and character development/psyche. "Out There" is my favorite number from it (watch both these videos back to back. This uploader chopped the song in two probably to avoid Disney copyright):

Along with powerful, thrilling score (that finale...whoa), the cinematography is breathtaking. 360 degree shots, lens flare and light diffusion, long, extended takes, epic pullaways - this film is just so meticulously and beautifully crafted, and it's insane to think that everything here is created from scratch. It's not like live-action where the camera will happen to catch certain things. Every element was placed there with a purpose. 

Hunchback has been expanded to a really great stage musical (a musical which, unfortunately, will never make it to Broadway because the union won't cover the massive number of chorus members needed for the score). I hope that since Disney is very gung-go about remaking most of their animated catalogue in live-action that they'll eventually revisit Hunchback. It's begging for its expanded stage version to be made into an epic film. 

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My favorite animated musical is a close tie between Beauty and the Beast (1991) and The Little Mermaid (1989).  I saw both in the theater in elementary school when they were originally released, so there's also the nostalgia factor.  In Beauty and the Beast, I love Gaston's song: "When I was a lad, I ate 4 dozen eggs ev'ry morning to help me get large. Now that I'm grown, I eat 5 dozen eggs and I'm roughly the size of a baaaaaarge!" I also love "Be Our Guest" (how much food do they think Belle can eat? Lol) and the title song "Beauty and the Beast."  Angela Lansbury's voice was perfect for that song.

I love The Little Mermaid as well.  My favorite song in that film is Ursula's "Poor Unfortunate Souls."  Especially her "And don't underestimate the importance of body language!" 

Other favorite animated musicals:

-Sleeping Beauty (1959).  Even though there aren't as many songs, the film is gorgeous and Prince Phillip is a dreamboat!

-Tangled (2010). Flynn Rider is second place for most attractive Disney prince.  I just love this film, it's so much fun.  I especially love the scene when Flynn takes Rapunzel to the lantern festival.  

-Cinderella (1950).  The animals are so fun and the animation of Cinderella's rags turning into the silver ball gown is gorgeous.  The step-sisters are hilarious as is Lucifer the cat.  I always ask though: Why didn't the Prince just go with the Duke when he went around town visiting all the eligible maidens? He could have saved a lot of time and hassle! 

-Aladdin (1992).  I saw this film in the theater in elementary school as well.  Robin Williams' Genie and the Magic Carpet make the movie, imo.  Who didn't get a little choked up when Aladdin uses his final wish to set Genie free?
 

I don't know if these count, as they're not full length features, but two of my absolute favorite Looney Tunes shorts feature a lot of music: 

-The Three Little Bops.  The story of "The Three Little Pigs" that lead a jazz trio.  The Wicked Wolf desperately wants to join the group and turn it into a quartet, but they repeatedly deem the wolf "too square."  Each time the wolf is turned down from a club (One club made of straw, the other sticks and the third bricks), he retaliates by destroying it.  Upon destruction of the house of bricks, the wolf dies and doesn't go to heaven, but to hell.  It is there, where he finally learns that "some like it hot," and his ghost is finally allowed to join the trio.

-One Froggy Evening.  This cartoon is hilarious.  In this one, a man finds a box next to a construction site.  Inside the box is a frog.  The frog starts singing and dancing.  Seeing dollar signs, the man immediately plans to exploit his singing and dancing frog's talents.  There's just one catch: the frog will only sing and dance for him.  Each time the man plans to show off his frog's musical talent, the frog refuses to perform.  Eventually, the frog's lack of cooperation and the man's greediness causes him to become penniless and he eventually ends up in jail for disturbing the peace in a park when his frog won't stop singing and dancing.  Eventually the man re-buries the frog in a box only for it to be found 100 years in the future.  A man decked out in space gear finds the frog, who immediately starts singing and dancing for him.  The future man sees dollar signs...

 

 

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20 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

My favorite animated musical is a close tie between Beauty and the Beast (1991) and The Little Mermaid (1989).  I saw both in the theater in elementary school when they were originally released, so there's also the nostalgia factor.  In Beauty and the Beast, I love Gaston's song: "When I was a lad, I ate 4 dozen eggs ev'ry morning to help me get large. Now that I'm grown, I eat 5 dozen eggs and I'm roughly the size of a baaaaaarge!" I also love "Be Our Guest" (how much food do they think Belle can eat? Lol) and the title song "Beauty and the Beast."  Angela Lansbury's voice was perfect for that song.

I love The Little Mermaid as well.  My favorite song in that film is Ursula's "Poor Unfortunate Souls."  Especially her "And don't underestimate the importance of body language!" 

Other favorite animated musicals:

-Sleeping Beauty (1959).  Even though there aren't as many songs, the film is gorgeous and Prince Phillip is a dreamboat!

-Tangled (2010). Flynn Rider is second place for most attractive Disney prince.  I just love this film, it's so much fun.  I especially love the scene when Flynn takes Rapunzel to the lantern festival.  

-Cinderella (1950).  The animals are so fun and the animation of Cinderella's rags turning into the silver ball gown is gorgeous.  The step-sisters are hilarious as is Lucifer the cat.  I always ask though: Why didn't the Prince just go with the Duke when he went around town visiting all the eligible maidens? He could have saved a lot of time and hassle! 

-Aladdin (1992).  I saw this film in the theater in elementary school as well.  Robin Williams' Genie and the Magic Carpet make the movie, imo.  Who didn't get a little choked up when Aladdin uses his final wish to set Genie free?
 

I don't know if these count, as they're not full length features, but two of my absolute favorite Looney Tunes shorts feature a lot of music: 

-The Three Little Bops.  The story of "The Three Little Pigs" that lead a jazz trio.  The Wicked Wolf desperately wants to join the group and turn it into a quartet, but they repeatedly deem the wolf "too square."  Each time the wolf is turned down from a club (One club made of straw, the other sticks and the third bricks), he retaliates by destroying it.  Upon destruction of the house of bricks, the wolf dies and doesn't go to heaven, but to hell.  It is there, where he finally learns that "some like it hot," and his ghost is finally allowed to join the trio.

-One Froggy Evening.  This cartoon is hilarious.  In this one, a man finds a box next to a construction site.  Inside the box is a frog.  The frog starts singing and dancing.  Seeing dollar signs, the man immediately plans to exploit his singing and dancing frog's talents.  There's just one catch: the frog will only sing and dance for him.  Each time the man plans to show off his frog's musical talent, the frog refuses to perform.  Eventually, the frog's lack of cooperation and the man's greediness causes him to become penniless and he eventually ends up in jail for disturbing the peace in a park when his frog won't stop singing and dancing.  Eventually the man re-buries the frog in a box only for it to be found 100 years in the future.  A man decked out in space gear finds the frog, who immediately starts singing and dancing for him.  The future man sees dollar signs...

 

 

The Looney Tunes always had great music, even just the scores, and I feel that was a part of their appeal. Carl Stalling and Milt Franklyn, who were the Looney Tunes composers during the golden era, both had a wide variety of musical tastes that ranged from classical music to jazz, and they were good at incorporating these into the cartoons. Both of them were geniuses.

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I saw Lady and the Tramp (1955) when I was little, and I remember liking the Siamese cats and their song.  But Disney hated cats, they're the villains in his films.  Dogs are the good guys.  Peggy Lee wrote the songs with Sonny Burke, and she sang several of them.

Per Wikipedia: "Originally, Lady and the Tramp was planned to be filmed in a regular full frame aspect ratio. However, due to the growing interest of widescreen film among movie-goers, Disney decided to animate the film in CinemaScope making Lady and the Tramp the first animated feature filmed in the process. This new innovation presented additional problems for the animators: the expansion of space created more realism but gave fewer closeups. It also made it difficult for a single character to dominate the screen so that groups had to be spread out to keep the screen from appearing sparse. Longer takes become necessary since constant jump-cutting would seem too busy or annoying. Layout artists essentially had to reinvent their technique. Animators had to remember that they had to move their characters across a background instead of the background passing behind them."

"One Froggy Evening" is such a classic.  Michigan J. Frog was the mascot of the WB network.

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1 hour ago, Pastiche said:

I saw Lady and the Tramp (1955) when I was little, and I remember liking the Siamese cats and their song.  But Disney hated cats, they're the villains in his films. 

I seem to recall The Aristocats being depicted favorably.  

It's not animated, but Disney's Homeward Bound features Sassy the cat who cooperates with the two dogs to help them find their home. 

Cats traditionally are much meaner than dogs.  Don't get me wrong, there are mean dogs too, but cats are typically associated with being jerks. Lucifer in Cinderella is hilarious. 

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Disney takes the cake when it comes to animated musicals, and from their vast library, if I was forced to pick my top 5, would be "Snow White and the Seven Dwarves" (1937), "Pinocchio" (1940), "Sleeping Beauty" (1959), "The Jungle Book"'(1967) and "Beauty and the Beast" (1991).

Yet my favorite as far as comparing live-action movie musicals to animated ones would be Don Bluth's phenomenal "Anastasia" (1997). The songs and spectacle are equal to any Broadway musical, and the animation is just gorgeous.

 

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12 hours ago, TheMadKiwi said:

My favorite animated musical is actually The Hunchback of Notre Dame. It's the most sophisticated score and songbook the studio's ever done. Every number has so many layers to it and contributes a great deal to both the plot and character development/psyche. "Out There" is my favorite number from it (watch both these videos back to back. This uploader chopped the song in two probably to avoid Disney copyright):

Along with powerful, thrilling score (that finale...whoa), the cinematography is breathtaking. 360 degree shots, lens flare and light diffusion, long, extended takes, epic pullaways - this film is just so meticulously and beautifully crafted, and it's insane to think that everything here is created from scratch. It's not like live-action where the camera will happen to catch certain things. Every element was placed there with a purpose. 

Hunchback has been expanded to a really great stage musical (a musical which, unfortunately, will never make it to Broadway because the union won't cover the massive number of chorus members needed for the score). I hope that since Disney is very gung-go about remaking most of their animated catalogue in live-action that they'll eventually revisit Hunchback. It's begging for its expanded stage version to be made into an epic film. 

AMEN!!! YOU BEAT ME TO IT!!! Also my all-time favorite story!! thank you so much for sharing the clips!!

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17 hours ago, Lanin said:

This might not count for some people, but I have to say Rankin-Bass' "Santa Claus is Coming to Town".

 

To that I would add this one!

 

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Yes, Fantasia is perfecto!  I used it as a teaching tool when I taught art, and I have the pony, the alligator, and the hippo ceramic figures.  

Favorite musical numbers in general:  Colors of the Wind from Pocahontas, and Bella Noche from Lady and the Tramp.

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I have several, but since we've studied Judy Garland, here's one that not many may know she did, from 1962, Gay Purr-ee. I think TCM showed this either last year or earlier this year:

 

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18 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I seem to recall The Aristocats being depicted favorably.  

It's not animated, but Disney's Homeward Bound features Sassy the cat who cooperates with the two dogs to help them find their home. 

Cats traditionally are much meaner than dogs.  Don't get me wrong, there are mean dogs too, but cats are typically associated with being jerks. Lucifer in Cinderella is hilarious. 

Of course, Aristocats came out in 1970, several years after Disney's death.

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On ‎6‎/‎25‎/‎2018 at 2:34 PM, BunnyWhit said:

We’ve spent three weeks sharing our favorite (and not so favorite) musicals, singers and dancers, even individual musical numbers. Now, how about a shout out to our favorite purely celluloid friends and favorites.

I’m going to have to go with Fantasia (1940) as my favorite animated musical. Any of you who’ve seen it won’t have to ask why. Any of you who’ve not seen it — see it!

Favorite sing-along-able number might just be “I Wan’na Be Like You” from The Jungle Book (1967) because Louis Prima is the man. He swings even when he’s not trying to.

Favorite guilty pleasure animated must be The Aristocats (1970) because “Ev’rybody Wants to Be a Cat”. It’s the fabulous Phil Harris, Scatman Crothers, Thurl Ravenscroft, Al Rinker, and Liz English.

 

 

 

Love this topic, thanks for starting post!

Agree with "Wanna be like you", and Everybody wants to be a cat". So jazzy and fun! These were my faves as a kid and still make me happy today.

My new faves are "Hunchback of Notre Dame", love, love, love the music! Love Stephen Schwartz! And "Prince of Egypt", beautifully music and songs. 

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23 hours ago, TheMadKiwi said:

Alice in Wonderland may be my favorite Disney film (as if my avatar didn't already tip everyone off), but I admit that its role as a musical is very incidental. Most of the songs are 30 seconds long and randomly pop in and out of the dialogue purely for entertainment rather than any storytelling purpose.

My favorite animated musical is actually The Hunchback of Notre Dame. It's the most sophisticated score and songbook the studio's ever done. Every number has so many layers to it and contributes a great deal to both the plot and character development/psyche. "Out There" is my favorite number from it (watch both these videos back to back. This uploader chopped the song in two probably to avoid Disney copyright):

Along with powerful, thrilling score (that finale...whoa), the cinematography is breathtaking. 360 degree shots, lens flare and light diffusion, long, extended takes, epic pullaways - this film is just so meticulously and beautifully crafted, and it's insane to think that everything here is created from scratch. It's not like live-action where the camera will happen to catch certain things. Every element was placed there with a purpose. 

Hunchback has been expanded to a really great stage musical (a musical which, unfortunately, will never make it to Broadway because the union won't cover the massive number of chorus members needed for the score). I hope that since Disney is very gung-go about remaking most of their animated catalogue in live-action that they'll eventually revisit Hunchback. It's begging for its expanded stage version to be made into an epic film. 

I am with you on this one. This is by far my favorite. The sheer epic-ness of the musical score, the lyrics! I love "Out There", and the sheer soaring melody and singing in "Bells of Notre Dame". Agree 100%! 

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23 hours ago, TheMadKiwi said:

Hunchback has been expanded to a really great stage musical (a musical which, unfortunately, will never make it to Broadway because the union won't cover the massive number of chorus members needed for the score). I hope that since Disney is very gung-go about remaking most of their animated catalogue in live-action that they'll eventually revisit Hunchback. It's begging for its expanded stage version to be made into an epic film. 

I remember the problem with it when it came out was the same problem with Frozen:

Disney was counting so many dollars from Beauty & the Beast on Broadway, Jeffrey Katzenberg's studio order to create more earthbound human stories (that could be more easily adapted into shows, at the parks, for a start) caused Hunchback's blocking to be deliberately made stage-ready, where the camera swirls all around basically three different sets, with no action that couldn't be duplicated on an Equity stage six months later.  As a result, older fans--for whom this wasn't the first Disney animated musical they saw in a theater ;) --felt the movie was hampered, claustrophobic, and didn't seem to have any reason to be animated, except for the comedy-relief gargoyles (who were starting to push the "Wisecracking sidekick" trope to the breaking point).  Like Frozen, it felt like we were watching the 85-minute commercial for a forthcoming stage musical we were going to get ANYWAY, regardless of whether we liked the animated or not.

To this day, no one can remember why Hercules, the next year, had audiences in full frothing raging mutiny, and (undeservedly) became the studio's biggest theatrical flop of the 90's, but I have a distinct theory of "Delayed reaction".  Our "betrayal" issues going from Lion King to Pocahontas still needed one or two more films to work out.

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I loved most of the earlier Disney musicals Snow White, Pinocchio, Sleeping Beauty...and the later ones Beauty and The Beast and The Lion King. It’s amazing what great stage plays those two films made. 

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