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slaytonf

Opulence on opulence: Tommy directed by Ken Russell

86 posts in this topic

keithmoon-jpg.253995

Hey, everybody has a bad day, or night, once in a while.

Substitute, me for him,

Substitute, Erwin's my kin.

Substitute, it's just for fun,

I think I'll get my Weltkrieg done.

 

I'm just thankful they didn't make a movie out of Who's Next or The Who By Numbers.

I think Moon always had large eyebrows. It's just that his boyish bangs hid those

big caterpillars. When his hair wasn't in the way, there they were in all their glory.

 

 

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5 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

VALENTINO suuuuuuuuuuuuucks!!!!!!

they showed it on TCM when Leslie Caron was star of the month a few years back, and I still remember a lot of people hit the message boards the next day to be like "what the hell was that thing about?!?"

LAIR OF THE WHITE WORM is unique. I've been looking for it online lately, but can't find it.

Lair of the White Worm is, until the end of August, slithering the rounds around the premium channel Showtime in their on demand section, and they have issued a (very expensive) Blu-Ray of the film recently.

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I wonder if the "homage" to Eddie Cochran in the Tommy Overture referred to in an earlier post is the surf style drumming aspect of the song?

Keith Moon was a HUGE surf music fan and sometimes adopted that rapid style of drumming for The Who and other projects.
Moon will always be my favorite drummer (Clem Burke is my favorite living drummer) because of his seemingly "wild" style: hitting odd combinations of drums & cymbals, often off the beat. (I loathe 2/4 beat songs)

It's a testament to the band they could keep up with it. Entwistle's base was more of a grounding element than typical drum beats.
What I find funny is that Roger Daltrey was considered a "tough street kid" when The Who formed. He always struck me as a poufter-especially with those big baby eyes and curly blonde hair.

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Actually, Hendrix's MITCH MITCHELL was and always will by MY favorite rock drummer from that era.(Tommy Campbell and Michael Walden are vying for top spot these days).

Moon and AYNSLEY DUNBAR are running neck-and-neck for #2.

And you're the ONLY female I know of who thought of ROGER DALTREY as some kind of "poufter".  And, I think you probably meant ENTWISTLE'S "bass" and not "base", as the word "base" in relation to ANY guitar was used on an old VENTURES LP cover("The Ventures Play Telstar And The Lonely Bull"  '63) in describing NOKIE EDWARDS' role as the "lead" guitarist, but used the word "base" instead.  ;)

Sepiatone

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4 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

What I find funny is that Roger Daltrey was considered a "tough street kid" when The Who formed. He always struck me as a poufter-especially with those big baby eyes and curly blonde hair.

Roger was from a rougher neighborhood, and learned to use his fists at an early age. He was always the toughest of the band members, and was known to scrap with people occasionally at shows. He had a quick temper, perhaps part of the "short man's syndrome", wherein shorter guys feel they have something to prove physically. 5'6'' is rather small, but on stage in between the 6' Townshend and 6' Entwhistle, it was even more exaggerated. 

I've read Pete Townshend's lengthy autobiography, as well as a massive biography on Keith Moon, and they both discuss how Roger was strictly a co-worker in the beginning, and not a pal that hung around with the others. Part of this was Roger's general attitude, but also that Roger was married and had his first child not long after the band formed, so he was more of a "settled adult" than the debauched rock stars the other three quickly became. 

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Oops, thanks for that correction of the word "bass", I can't beweeve I made such a mistake.

My first WHO album, surprisingly still in good condition:
hignaf8ou1vr.jpg

While Townsend's size is obvious, I had no idea Entwistle was tall too.

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I think that could be mostly "camera angle", but I do recall reading somewhere that Entwistle was somewhat taller than the others.  Just can't verify it as fact.

And in that photo....don't it seem there's a resemblance between KEITH MOON and PAUL SIMON?  

And glad to learn you still have that old vinyl.  Sadly, mine is and has been long gone.  :(

Sepiatone 

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On 7/1/2018 at 11:15 PM, Vautrin said:

keithmoon-jpg.253995

Hey, everybody has a bad day

I just love the expression and everything about the guy who is standing next to the lady with the aggressively feathered hair in this photo. 

He looks like he's seriously weighing his chances on jumping over the fence and giving Moon the butt whooping he deserves for his "Little Mr. Luftwaffe" get up.

I feel a certain camaraderie with him, thanks to present circumstances, and I'd 10000 times rather hang out with him than Keith Moon,  even if DR PHIBES was one of his favorite films 

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3 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

I think that could be mostly "camera angle", but I do recall reading somewhere that Entwistle was somewhat taller than the others.  Just can't verify it as fact.

Maybe you read about it in my post three posts above yours where I stated that both Townshend and Entwhistle were 6' tall.

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9 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I just love the expression and everything about the guy who is standing next to the lady with the aggressively feathered hair in this photo. 

He looks like he's seriously weighing his chances on jumping over the fence and giving Moon the butt whooping he deserves for his "Little Mr. Luftwaffe" get up.

I feel a certain camaraderie with him, thanks to present circumstances, and I'd 10000 times rather hang out with him than Keith Moon,  even if DR PHIBES was one of his favorite films 

He would have probably been more offended if Moon wore a Klan outfit. I first saw this photo

in a book titled Rock 'N' Roll Babylon, an obvious take on the Kenneth Anger book, dealing with

rock bad behavior instead of Hollywood bad behavior. I think Moon enjoyed shocking people more

than making any political statement. He is dressed up as General Rommel, who, as far as Nazis go,

was fairly harmless. There is also a two page photo spread of Keith in the nude on a bearskin rug,

which proves that, even without wearing a uniform, Moon can be offensive. I'd rather read about

Moon's various exploits than have been there for them. 

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On 7/1/2018 at 3:37 PM, misswonderly3 said:

Definitely not intended for four-year-olds, and I hope you'll forgive me if I say I can't imagine what your mother could have been thinking to take you.

My mother wonders what she was thinking whenever it comes up in conversation.  She is a very different person now. As a true fan of The Who, I agree.  The music is epic.

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I've read in a number of places that Daltrey was on the short side, though I

don't think any mentioned his exact height. Considering that the Who were

notorious for their discord, having a good punch was an advantage. It's

not the dog in the fight...

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13 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Oops, thanks for that correction of the word "bass", I can't beweeve I made such a mistake.

My first WHO album, surprisingly still in good condition:
hignaf8ou1vr.jpg

While Townsend's size is obvious, I had no idea Entwistle was tall too.

So are the songs.

"Why doncha all jus ffffffadeawayyyy. . . .

Don't try ta dig what we all s-s-s-s-ayyy. . ."

The original punk song.  Twenty years before punk.

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20 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Maybe you read about it in my post three posts above yours where I stated that both Townshend and Entwhistle were 6' tall.

I was basing my reply on TIKI's comment accompanying the posted photo of the LP cover, which makes ENTWISTLE look a few "heads" taller than all the rest. 

And too, I don't consider 6' to be "tall.  Since I too, am 6', and had(and have) a brother, a few friends and a few nephews who top off at  6'3'+!  ;)

Oh, and SLAYTON  re: "My Generation".  Not only IMHO does the tune STILL kick azz, but I recall early '80's local "punk" band TOBY REDD always doing a "cover" of it in their set!  TOBY REDD is the band from which came CHAD SMITH, drummer of The Red Hot Chili Peppers.    He was Redd's 2nd drummer.

Sepiatone

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On 7/1/2018 at 3:16 PM, misswonderly3 said:

?? I'm intrigued by this statement. I'm pretty familiar with both "Tommy" (including the Overture) and the music of Eddie Cochran. And in fact, just out of curiousity, figuring it's quite likely I might have missed something, I just listened to the Tommy Overture.  Cant' hear any "homage" to Eddie Cochran.  Please 'splain.

(Of course, maybe you meant the "overture" as heard in the movie version, which I haven't heard for years.)

Hi, Miss Wonderly! If you own Eddie's albums, play the intro to his song "Three Steps to Heaven". The guitar riff he used at the beginning is used by The Who in the initial sections of their overture. I just cued up on Youtube the original album cut, labelled there as "The Who: Overture" which shows the original album cover picture. At about one minute into the production, you will hear the same riff used by Eddie Cochran in his song "Three Steps to Heaven". Though I like the whole song by Cochran, it is the guitar riff in the beginning which is the most memorable part, which is probably why it is the only part of the song utilized by The Who. As I recall they were big Cochran fans, and used some of his songs in their early performances and songs like "Summertime Blues" on album cuts.

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On 7/1/2018 at 1:39 PM, misswonderly3 said:

CaveGirl, priding yourself as I presume you do on your exceptional literary skills, I'm surprised you did not practice the dull but necessary discipline of paragraphing in the above post.

No matter how interesting the content, my eyes and my brain have difficulty taking in one huge block of text. I realize there are times when it's fun to do this on purpose, perhaps that was what you were aiming for. But for me, one long run-on big uninterrupted block of text is just a can of worms.  Er, beans.

"Pride" goeth before a fall, Miss Wonderly, so it is a trait I would disavow pragmatically. 

As for "exceptional literary skills" methinks you are confusing me with another, as I am just a poster who likes movies and enjoys discussing them.

In answer to your critique, which is very well founded, I can only say that I would be dishonoring the nuns who taught me, to make paragraph incisions that would lead one to believe I had gone onto a new topic, instead of continuing the lone topic I was remarking upon, which was beans. Bean, beans and more beans! My main goal as taught by Sister Cherubim was to be true to the belief that a paragraph deals with a single idea. Hence, I continued on and would have found it disconcerting to the reader to abruptly rip into a new paragraph, as if I was now on a new topic, which I was not. But I can sincerely understand your upset at encountering a lack of blank space on which to rest your eyes. I believe you have remarked upon this before, but I'm afraid you shall just have to be wary of reading any of my posts, since my goal here is not to be gramatically correct always but to share a love of films with a like audience.

I will attribute my predilection to long, boring, wordy persiflage due to being introduced to the writing style known as Stream of Consciousness, when I was assigned to read "Ulysses" by James Joyce. You can at least be happy that I did not totally adopt Molly Bloom's lack of paragraphing, punctuating, capitalizing or other egregious standards when she was making her dull and lackluster thoughts known to the public.

I would be most pleased if you chose to occasionally revamp my posts into ones more comprehensible to those like-minded, as long as you don't charge me per word!

Thanks again, and I hope you did notice that I broke this up into small paragraphs according to your dictated discipline. You are very kind to take such interest in making my posts more readable and comprehensible.

I extend my most heartfelt apologies to both you and Tiki Soo for my errant disregard at the rules of paragraphing since it must have caused you both distress, both to boring content and giving you both headaches possibly.

 

On 7/1/2018 at 7:06 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

VALENTINO suuuuuuuuuuuuucks!!!!!!

they showed it on TCM when Leslie Caron was star of the month a few years back, and I still remember a lot of people hit the message boards the next day to be like "what the hell was that thing about?!?"

LAIR OF THE WHITE WORM is unique. I've been looking for it online lately, but can't find it.

Lorna, I have a Betamax tape of LOTWW. If you have a Sony Betamax player, think of the fun!

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On 6/30/2018 at 9:03 AM, MotherofZeus said:

So...I love The Who, but I can't endure Tommy.  I'll tell you why and I will date myself as a spring chicken for some and a lady of a certain age for others. My mom took me to see  Tommy in the theater when I was four.  I remember everything about that day in perfect crystalized clarity. She and I recently discussed my being a child of the 70s and how many inappropriate movies I saw for my age.  Tommy scared the crap out of me, and, to be honest, my four-year old brain rightly or wrongly was scared straight off of narcotics from that day forward. Honest to goodness, I've never so much as dabbled in taking an extra prescription medication or the whacky weedus (as my beloved Mel Brooks called it). All. Because. of. Tommy. 

I can't speak to the merits of the movie because  don't remember it in a reasonable, knowledgable way. I just remember being frightened by what it showed my little eyes. Furthermore, I won't watch it again as there is a psychic anxiety about watching it that has to do with many other things from the 70s I'd rather not relive. I did love growing up in the 70s before all the safety mechanisms and lockdowns on how we raise children robbed kids of certain journeys of self-discovery and independence that now has to be programmed into their daily rituals instead of fallen into naturally as we all used to, but seeing Tommy was not a necessary part of that. 

On the other hand, The Who remans part of my daily listening experience. I'm teaching myself guitar, and I aspire to some of the solos even as I'm just learning rhythm at present.

Thanks for the topic. Lots to unload here around the movie and the music -- and the decade. ?

What an interesting expose, MOZ! Thanks for sharing and I think even the most hard core movie fans have a film that they just cannot watch again, that affected them in perhaps an adverse way. I can imagine though that a mother or guardian would never have had a clear idea of the visual mechanics utilized in the movie "Tommy" that were a bit scary, to even an adult watching, just from their knowledge of the original album and its songs. I was knocked out by the visuals when I first saw it, as they almost came off the screen and onto one's lap a bit like watching Andy Warhol's ventures into 3-D filmmaking. Ken Russell meant to outrage and managed it quite well with this film.

I salute your statement about how "safety mechanisms and lockdowns... robbed kids of certain journeys of self-discovery and independence". So true... 

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31 minutes ago, CaveGirl said:


In answer to your critique, which is very well founded, I can only say that I would be dishonoring the nuns who taught me, to make paragraph incisions that would lead one to believe I had gone onto a new topic, instead of continuing the lone topic I was remarking upon, which was beans. Bean, beans and more beans! My main goal as taught by Sister Cherubim was to be true to the belief that a paragraph deals with a single idea.

O what havoc nuns hath wrought!  

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45 minutes ago, slaytonf said:

O what havoc nuns hath wrought!  

Better watch out, Slayton or some of the more sadistic nuns here might chide you and ask if you are using the "O" as poetic apostrophe when you really needed to use "Oh" as an interjection!

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Definitely apostrophe.  My reference is not named.  I can name it if you want.

There, you've made me look up the meaning of apostrophe.

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On 7/3/2018 at 5:00 PM, Vautrin said:

He would have probably been more offended if Moon wore a Klan outfit. I first saw this photo

in a book titled Rock 'N' Roll Babylon, an obvious take on the Kenneth Anger book, dealing with

rock bad behavior instead of Hollywood bad behavior. I think Moon enjoyed shocking people more

than making any political statement. He is dressed up as General Rommel, who, as far as Nazis go,

was fairly harmless. There is also a two page photo spread of Keith in the nude on a bearskin rug,

which proves that, even without wearing a uniform, Moon can be offensive. I'd rather read about

Moon's various exploits than have been there for them. 

I own that book! 

It has some, shall we say, interesting photos. It's part of my rock and roll collection along with Little Richard's autograph and my Elvis charm bracelet, and flasher button.

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2 hours ago, CaveGirl said:

I own that book! 

It has some, shall we say, interesting photos. It's part of my rock and roll collection along with Little Richard's autograph and my Elvis charm bracelet, and flasher button.

For some mysterious reason, there is a fair amount of photos of women with their boobs

front and center. I haven't really looked through it in a while, so I don't know how accurate

the text itself is, but I would guess more so than the original, Hollywood, Babylon. And there

are some grisly pics in there, one of Otis Redding as he is fished out of the lake. I really don't

have much in way of rock and roll memorabilia. I still have the ticket stubs from early 1970s

David Bowie concerts, but you don't have to be very special to go buy some tickets.

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BTW:

This past Thursday was when ROGER DALTREY was scheduled to appear with The Detroit Symphony Orchestra at the orchestra's summer home of the Meadowbrook music amphitheater on the Oakland University campus for a performance of TOMMY.

I didn't know anyone who might have attended and have yet to see or read any review of the performance, but I'll keep eyes and ears "peeled" for anything about it.

Sepiatone

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