Suzy-Q

Non Musical Films With Music as Key Element

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This was discussed in the 6/28 lecture, so I'll bite. Here are the ones I can think of off the top of my head. (I've excluded concert films and musical bios.) There are surely a bunch I have missed:

 

1. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

2. The Graduate

3. Forrest Gump

4. A Mighty Wind (might even be considered a musical)

5. Saturday Night Fever

6. American Graffiti

7. Pulp Fiction

8. Easy Rider

9. Shaft

10. O Brother Where Art Thou

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Gosford Park (2001): set in 1930s England, one of the characters is Ivor Novello, a popular Welsh songwriter and actor of that time. He's played by Jeremy Northam and is frequently called on to provide music for his fellow guests at the country house party (much to the chagrin of the cranky Maggie Smith!). One of the key scenes plays out as he sings the wistful "The Land of Might-Have-Been."

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Pitch Perfect(s)

Close Encounters of the Third Kind

Star Wars

The Man Who Knew Too  Much

The Buddy Holly Story

Play Misty for Me

The Sting

Whiplash

Mo Better Blues

Birdland

Cadillac Records

Down With Love

Florence Foster Jenkins

The Blues Brothers

Guardians of the Galaxy 1&2

That Thing You Do

Pirate Radio

The Fabulous Baker Boys

Almost Famous

I have more.  These are the first to come to mind. 

 

 

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Rio Bravo. It is so not a musical but that scene in the jailhouse with Rickie Nelson and Dean Martin singing make the movie so awesome. Oh! Let's not forget Walter Brennan accompanying on the harmonica!

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Think of the important role music played in setting the mood and moving the action in classic non-musicals. A few quickly come to mind:

"King Kong" (1933), "Captain Blood" (1935), "The Adventures of Robin Hood" (1938), "Gone With the Wind" (1939), "Now, Voyager" (1942), "Casablanca" (1942), and "The Big Sleep" (1946).

The presence of music, by itself, is not sufficient to make a movie a musical. I would never think of any of these as musicals, but I don't think of them without thinking of the music. It takes something more than just music and songs to make a film a musical; exactly what it takes, I'm still not sure. It is kind of like the Supreme Court's definition of pornography, "I don't know how to define it, but I know it when I see it."

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The Piano

The Pianist 

The Soloist

Stand By Me

American Graffiti 

The Competition

A Face in the Crowd

Moonstruck

Paris Blues

Working on more.

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Captain's Courageous

Gilda

The Killers

Jaws

Godfather I&II

The Thomas Crown Affair (the original)

Bird

I think someone said Bridge On the River Kwai

Sweet Dreams

 

I'll stop now...I could go on forever, and I shouldn't. 

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The Blue Angel / Der Blaue Engel - Marlene Dietrich

Bringing Up Baby - just the one song, but how can you go wrong with Katharine Hepburn, Cary Grant, a dog, and a leopard?

Sabrina

The Man with the Golden Arm

The Red Balloon

Do the Right Thing

Strictly Ballroom

The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert

Muriel’s Wedding (what is it with ABBA in Australia in 1994?)

Empire Records

Trainspotting

Run Lola Run

Amélie

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Guardians of the Galaxy, particularly the first one, was the first film I thought of when considering an example of non-musical films wherein music is used in a "disruptive way". I've long found the film's use of popular music to provide insight into Quill's (Chris Pratt) character rather fascinating, and I personally hadn't seen a non-musical film use popular music in the way that this film does, prior to seeing this film. I think it's a really interesting and crucial element of the film that people overlook or underestimate the emotional power of.

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14 hours ago, Kate Mz said:

Bringing Up Baby - just the one song, but how can you go wrong with Katharine Hepburn, Cary Grant, a dog, and a leopard?

Or its use as one of the highlights of Born Yesterday.

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On 6/28/2018 at 1:46 PM, Suzy-Q said:

How could I forget The Big Lebowski?

Well, the Creedence tape is certainly important.

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3 minutes ago, nohojim said:

Well, the Creedence tape is certainly important.

More--

Just Dropped In (to see what condition my condition is in);

The Theme From Branded (Scorned as the one who ran, what can you do when you're branded and you know you're a man)

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The John Hughes Movies (Sixteen Candles, The Breakfast Club, Pretty In Pink, Some Kind of Wonderful, etc)

Good Morning, Vietnam

Platoon

Garden State

Barry Lyndon

Do the Right Thing

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I didn’t see these named, but if I repeat, please excuse....

They Shoot Horses, Don’t They? (1969) — it’s a dance marathon, after all

Annie Hall (1977) — who knew Keaton could carry a tune?....la de da, la de da....

The Blues Brothers (1980) — we’re gettin’ the band back together

School of Rock (2003) — because it’s a long way to the top if you wan’na rock ‘n’ roll

This Is Spinal Tap (1984) — because these go to 11

Ray (2004) — because he’s gonna make it do what it do, Baby

might be a stretch, but how about From Here To Eternity (1953) — wouldn’t be the same without Prew and his horn

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52 minutes ago, BunnyWhit said:

I didn’t see these named, but if I repeat, please excuse....

They Shoot Horses, Don’t They? (1969) — it’s a dance marathon, after all

Annie Hall (1977) — who knew Keaton could carry a tune?....la de da, la de da....

The Blues Brothers (1980) — we’re gettin’ the band back together

School of Rock (2003) — because it’s a long way to the top if you wan’na rock ‘n’ roll

This Is Spinal Tap (1984) — because these go to 11

Ray (2004) — because he’s gonna make it do what it do, Baby

might be a stretch, but how about From Here To Eternity (1953) — wouldn’t be the same without Prew and his horn

And Reenlistment Blues

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I will say just about any Hitchock movie used music to move the story forward.  Spellbound, Psycho, North by Northwest, and Stage Fright come to mind as excellent examples. 

The Thin Man might have been the movie most affected by music if not by a single instrument.

Kiss Me Deadly

Home Alone

 

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On 6/28/2018 at 4:32 PM, Marica said:

Walter Brennan accompanying on the harmonica!

Then maybe Meet John Doe (1941)

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