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CaveGirl

Vanishing Movie Cliches

51 posts in this topic

On 6/30/2018 at 3:30 AM, sewhite2000 said:

I think I kind of thought of one? "With or without?" being the only question ever asked in old movies when a hamburger is ordered. You've got a lot of topping and condiment choices in the post-"Have It Your Way" era: cheese, lettuce, tomatoes, onions, pickles, ketchup, mustard, mayonnaise, not to mention the modern craft burgers with bacon or avocado or a fried egg or kimchi or Lord knows what else. But in the classic movie era, burgers came with exactly one item you could choose to have or not have in addition to the meat and bread: onions! In some movies, they ask, "with or without onions?", but in others they just say, "with or without?", and it was assumed everyone in the audience knew what that meant. I would think most people my age or younger would have no idea what that question meant.

Speaking of hamburgers, everyone in the thirties and forties always orders a hamburger and a cup of coffee. Wonder when it changed to a hamburger and a coke?

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:D 

For a gag once( nad resulting in the loss of his job) a buddy of mine, working in a location of a hamburger chain called CARTER'S, and in response to another buddy ordering a "Burger with everything"  handed him a burger topped with:

Fried onions                                                                                                                                                      lettuce                                                                                                                                                            tomato                                                                                                                                                            mashed potatoes                                                                                                                                              mustard                                                                                                                                                          ketchup                                                                                                                                                           strawberry sauce                                                                                                                                               butterscotch sauce                                                                                                                                          hot fudge                                                                                                                                                      whipped cream

And a Marachino cherry...on TOP of the bun, held by a TOOTHPICK!  :D  

He later thought...."I shoulda added a PACK OF CIGARETTES!"

Sepiatone  (I don't know why that list isn't straight up and down)

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I like it when someone runs away or skips town, they say "he took a powder" or "she took a powder."  I heard it used in 1930s and 1940s films, usually gangster pics and screwball comedies.  

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On 6/30/2018 at 11:03 PM, Dargo said:

So, when's the last time you've heard someone say somebody else is "bats", and as in crazy.

I think the only time I've heard this expression used in the last three of four decades is probably only once a year and while watching Frank Faylen as Ernie the cabdriver warning Ward Bond as Bert the cop to be careful of a seemingly crazed Jimmy Stewart while he's frantically searching for his family in that abandoned old house.

(...yep, sure can't recall the last time anybody called me "bats" anyway...oooh suuuure, "CRAZY" maybe, but not "bats"!)  ;)

LOL

I was watching "The Bat" with Agnes Moorehead and Vincent Price and they didn't even use the term in that film, and there were a lot of batty folks, Dargo.

Love that Frank Faylen, and too bad they didn't show his son, Dobie in that film!

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     Can't think of any off the top of my head but one that does come to mind is the phrase "That's swell"; used countless times in films from the late 1920's early talkies thru the 30's and into the 40's.

     Another one I thought of from the many gangster films was "take him for a ride". We knew it wasn't going to be a Sunday drive thru the countryside. 

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10 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Speaking of hamburgers, everyone in the thirties and forties always orders a hamburger and a cup of coffee. Wonder when it changed to a hamburger and a coke?

Probably in the 50's, when teens started having spending-money, they were more likely to go a diner on Friday night, and they weren't coffee drinkers.

Unless it was one of those places where you could only get a cheeseburger and a Pepsi.

One of my favorites, not used in any movie I'M aware of, but heard said by "Mama" to Eunice in one of the "Family" skits on The Carol Burnett show---

"Eunice, I swear somebody done blowed out your PILOT LIGHT!"  :D

"Ya got splinters in the Windmills of Yer Mind!"

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13 hours ago, EricJ said:

Probably in the 50's, when teens started having spending-money, they were more likely to go a diner on Friday night, and they weren't coffee drinkers.

Unless it was one of those places where you could only get a cheeseburger and a Pepsi.

 

I dunno....

When I was 13-14 or so I used to go to CARTER'S or WHITE CASTLE and order coffee with my burgers.  Depended on the time of year.  Sure, summertime it'd be Coke (or some other "pop") 

And I believe that should be, "CHIZZ-b u g g e r!"  ;)  and... "CHEEPS", no fries.  :D

Sepiatone  Can't BELIEVE that in THIS case, Otto censored "b u g g e r"  :rolleyes:

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23 hours ago, cinemaspeak59 said:

I like it when someone runs away or skips town, they say "he took a powder" or "she took a powder."  I heard it used in 1930s and 1940s films, usually gangster pics and screwball comedies.  

That's a good one, cinemaspeak! Thanks...and just last night I saw people in an actual drugstore in a film, sitting at the soda fountain area, which one does not see anymore in films sadly....boo hoo!

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Richard Lederer has noted that even the title Dial M for Murder is dated, now that we punch rather than dial numbers on phones these days.

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My goto example of an Eastern accent from those days is how they say "Cheese boyga"

Quote

Sepiatone  Can't BELIEVE that in THIS case, Otto censored "b u g g e r"  :rolleyes:

That actually is an adult phrase.

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How about when someone was angry with the person they were speaking with? They would growl "Why you..." and that's it- no more to that sentence! 😄

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18 hours ago, CaveGirl said:

That's a good one, cinemaspeak! Thanks...and just last night I saw people in an actual drugstore in a film, sitting at the soda fountain area, which one does not see anymore in films sadly....boo hoo!

In FILMS?

Jeez.................. you don't even see them anymore in ACTUAL DRUGSTORES!  :huh:

Sepiatone

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15 hours ago, GGGGerald said:

My goto example of an Eastern accent from those days is how they say "Cheese boyga"

That actually is an adult phrase.

Really, I was thinking of JOHN BELUSI's accent used as the foreign counterman in those hilarious SNL sketches.  :D

I was never sure if it was supposed to be Middle Eastern or Greek.  :huh:

Sepiatone

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And another( since we've seemed to wander a bit from cliche and get into "obsolete" vernacular....)

In the beginning just a few moments ago in ARSENIC AND OLD LACE, we see two reporters(HANK MANN and CHARLES LANE) with Mann exclaiming, "There he is....the guy with the cheaters!"  

Now, in old movies (and not AFAIK the '40s) it was fairly common to hear sunglasses, and sometimes also EYEGLASSES referred to as "cheaters". I've worn corrective lenses since I was 14 and never heard anyone call them that.  Not to ME anyway.....

Sepiatone

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4 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

I was never sure if it was supposed to be Middle Eastern or Greek.  :huh:

Sepiatone

Greek, been in a lot Greek Diners in NYC.

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Yeah, my first guess was Greek, but you never know.....

Do remember though, back in the early to mid '70's some old comic talking about "old time Greasy Spoons" type of places.  One line I recall him using.....

"The kind of place where you can walk in and yell, HEY, GUS!  and everyone in the kitchen turns to look!"  ;) 

Sepiatone

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"Ducats" aka: theater tickets. Never hear them referred to as that now.

 

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I always wondered how "taking it on the LAM"  came about as a reference to being a fugitive, on the run from the authorities.

Sepiatone

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On 7/21/2018 at 1:39 PM, CaveGirl said:

That's a good one, cinemaspeak! Thanks...and just last night I saw people in an actual drugstore in a film, sitting at the soda fountain area, which one does not see anymore in films sadly....boo hoo!

Very true.  Drug stores nowadays are owned by chains and have harsh lighting and long lines.

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Nowadays?

Jeez......

I grew up in the mid '50's and a bit beyond, and most of the drugstores were "chains" of varying size.  Like KINSEL'S, CUNNINGHAM'S, REXALL.  My town had at least two each of them located withing city limits.  However.... ONE drug store, NORTON'S, was an independent,  with no other store located anywhere else, and too, a favorite among the city's population.  AND the first and(at the time, it closed up in the mid '80's) only one I knew of that had HOME DELIVERY of prescriptions.  And of course, ALL of these drug emporiums had soda fountains.  ;)

Sepiatone

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I once knew a guy who worked behind the soda fountain at a Woolworth's.

(...and boy, what a jerk he was)

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On 7/24/2018 at 7:46 AM, Sepiatone said:

And of course, ALL of these drug emporiums had soda fountains.  ;)

Goes back to the turn-of-the-century days when soda was still considered "Tonic"--as in, a health tonic--and you went to drug stores to get one.  Even with ice-cream or cherry-coke.

"Rexall" reminds me of our local store growing up in upstate-NY, that still had a working snack and soda counter...Of course, so did K-marts, in those days.  :(

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Yeah, I worked at a K-Mart for a time.  LOVED their eating area.  And I miss their( and the mother company's KRESGE's...) APPLE DUMPLINGS with that hot vanilla sauce poured over them.  I used to crack up the ladies behind the counter when I'd order one and say, "And don't forget that CHICKEN GRAVY on it!"  ;)   

And y'know, I never got into the habit of calling carbonated soft drinks "soda".  I always called it "pop".  Where I come from, a "soda" is any kind of "pop" poured over a scoop of ice cream at the bottom of a tall glass.  ;)

Sepiatone

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On 6/29/2018 at 11:57 AM, EricJ said:

Oh, thought it was going to be about technologically vanishing movie cliche's, like somebody coming home from work at night and suddenly getting a breakup or a villain warning on the answering machine tape to the landline phone in their kitchen.

I still have both.

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I don't know how much of a cliche this is actually.  But last month I caught the beginning of Caddyshack, a movie I otherwise have no strong opinions about, and it starts off with a throwaway joke that Michael O'Keefe's working class Irish parents have a lot of children.  This cliche would not have a long history for two reasons.  First, the Hays Code might find it slightly racy.  Second, screenwriters have limited reasons to refer to a large number of siblings or children.  There are a couple of movies which deal with large families:  Cheaper by the Dozen and Yours, Mine and Ours, oddly both remade.  But given that birth rates have been falling all across the board for at least half a century and that nativist fears have moved from Catholic birth rates to Hispanic immigration, I suspect this passing "joke" is a lot less rare. 

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