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MotherofZeus

Movies You Were Too Young to See But Saw

36 posts in this topic

So, I suspect this topic may have been posted before because this community is just so comprehensive. Yet, I can't find it. 

My mother was a single mother when I was born smack dab in 1970.  Add to that my granny was very dedicated to art influencing me. Consequently, I was exposed to a great deal that other kids may not have been exposed to at an early age.  As it relates to movies, here is my list of movies I shouldn't have seen with the corresponding age. I am leaving out the Noir movies I watched late at night as an insomniac, the movies my babysitters let me watch, and the great, age appropriate classics I saw as well.

I'd love to hear folks stories of similar shenanigans. I'm happy to discuss mine in more detail but would like to get others' takes. Again, please direct me to the topic space if I am rehashing old territory. 

Please also feel free to venture into a discussion of what or how to determine age appropriateness because a) I still am freaked out by stupid things based on early exposure but also b) I had intelligent people around me providing context, historical and cultural relativity, and open discussion regarding anything I wanted to know or say. That was the up side, and it made me a smarter person for it.

Here's my long and distinguished list:

Poseiden Adventure: I was 2 and I do remember. Coma: I was 8. A Clockwork Orange: I was one, so I can't remember it -- but, come on! Tommy: I was 4.  Jaws:  I was 5.  Animal House: I was 8.  Don't Be Afraid of the Dark: I was 3. Saturday Night Fever: I was 7. Personal Best: I was 12. Marathon Man: I was 6. The Towering Inferno: I was 4 (not yet 5 but close). Invasion of the Body Snatchers: I was 8. Looking for Mr. Goodbar: I was 7.  No, my mother didn't take me to it, but I was at a drive-in. We'd gone to see Darby O'Gill and the Little People, but guess what was showing one screen over and guess which one I saw more of? Life of Brian: I was 9. Midnight Express: I was 8. History of the World Part 1: I was 11.  A Little Romance: I was 9. Lenny: I was 4. Alien: I was 9.  The Silent Partner: I was 8. Monty Python and the Holy Grail: I was 5. Earthquake: I was 4. Eyes of Laura Mars: I was 8. Taxi Driver: I was 6. The Seven-Per-Cent Solution: I was 6. The Last Detail: I was 3.  Tess: I was 9. The Prisoner of 2nd Avenue: I was 5. Cabaret: I was 2 -- and I do remember. The Deep -- I was 7. Freebie and the Bean: I was 4.  Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band: I was 8. A Special Day: I was 7. Pretty Baby:  I was 8. Lipstick: I was 7. Shampoo: I was 5. Madame Rosa: I was 7. Harry and Tonto: I was 4. Deliverance: I was 2 and I do remember.  Serpico: I was 3. Soylent Green: I was 4. Ben: I was 2 but I think I saw it  as a rerun before I was 6. Little Darlings I was 10.

 

Anyone else out there????

 

 

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Taxi Driver at six! Holy crap! Did you understand it?

I was a good kid. I never once snuck into a rated-R movie. The first one I ever saw in the theater (an important distinction; we'll get to HBO in a minute) was Aliens, when I was 18.

My parents weren't terribly concerned about shielding me from anything except sex, it appears. I recall when I was 10, we were going to see The Goodbye Girl, but maybe some friends of my parents had said there was a sex scene it, so at the last second we saw Casey's Shadow instead. The first movie I can recall seeing with an inordinate amount of profanity was Smokey & the Bandit, which my dad took my brother and I to when I was 10. I remember my dad being really depressed after seeing it. Jackie Gleason was one of his favorite performers of all-time. He was devastated to see Gleason uttering so much profanity. I also saw Foul Play when I was 10, in which two people get stabbed to death, and Heaven Can Wait, in which Warren Beatty gets killed in a traffic accident five minutes into the movie (implied); and then at 11, my parents took me to The China Syndrome, in which Jack Lemon gets shot in the chest, and the whole state of California almost blows up. My parents, like most of their generation, had no thoughts or qualms at all about shielding me from violence or language, only sex. I saw some movies with my brother that, though they were PG, my parents probably would not have approved of - The Bad News Bears Go to Japan at 10; 1941 at 11; and Airplane! at 12.

My parents got HBO when I was 12, and that was where I saw all my first rated-R movies. Just some of the movies I would have seen on HBO between the age of 12 and 14 were Altered StatesLookerFast Times at Ridgmont HighBlade RunnerSaturn 3ParadiseThe Blue LagoonEndless LoveThe Elephant ManVictor/VictoriaAll That JazzAnimal HouseComa, History of the World Part 1Little Darlings, the '70s version of Invasion of the Body SnatchersThe Poseidon AdventureShampoo and Salem's Lot. Some of those were PG, but they all had mature themes. 

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Wow. That's amazing, and that's a lot of films (and a lot of excellent films at that). I'm a 90s kid myself, and I didn't see too many Rs before the age of 17. I did sneak a few and watched them alone at 16. However, I did see Working Girl at the age of 4, and although I'm not certain due to a  very fuzzy memory, I might have seen Postcards from the Edge and Foul Play (PG, but still) around the same time. I do know I grew up watching a lot of  films not known to be for children that were PGs and PG-13s like Terms of Endearment, Beaches, Steel Magnolias, Moonstruck, The First Wives Club, 9 to 5, Fried Green Tomatoes, While You Were Sleeping, Sleepless in Seattle, and Driving Miss Daisy.

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Oy, when I was that young, there weren't really any movies that were considered "too old" for a kid.  Maybe the subject matter in A SUMMER PLACE ('59; I was 8 at the time) or PEYTON PLACE( '58, when I was 7) would have been considered too brash for my "delicate age" at the time, and certainly, LOLITA( '62, I was 11) would have been a parental "no-no", but I wouldn't have been interested in those at the time anyway(in fact, I wasn't).  So, no harm,no foul!  ;)

In fact, the first "nude scene" most(or any) of us saw in a movie was the NANOSECOND flash of a naked OLIVIA HUSSEY in 1968's ROMEO AND JULIET.   :D 

Sepiatone

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My dad snuck me into Blazing Saddles at 10, which, N-words and (then-inscrutable) Madeline Kahn lyrics aside, was pretty much a perfect 10-yo's speed.  To think that in 1974, such a shocking thing as gaseous baked-bean jokes were considered unfit for tender eyes under 17, and befitting a Restricted rating... 

One of my earliest theater memories was going with the family to see 2001: a Space Odyssey at 5 (although that was soft G-rated by '68 standards), since it was easier than finding a babysitter, or else I might just sleep through it.  I did.  ?

One time, we had a summer youth group going out to see a big summer movie, and since everyone still loved Richard Dreyfus from "Goodbye Girl" and "Close Encounters" in '78, we chose to go see The Big Fix, and barely understood a bit of it.  Watched it again a few years ago, and the movie's "Whatever happened to our college-radical 60's?" theme was literally five years ahead of its time before "The Big Chill" grabbed all the credit, but that was lost on us back then.

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Thought of a few others I saw on HBO between the ages of 12 and 14: 10ZappedRisky BusinessTarzan the Ape ManBachelor PartyThe Star ChamberFriday the 13thHalloween III: Season of the WitchBlame It on Rio

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I distinctly remember watching THE SHINING and STIR CRAZY at age 7 on cable. 

I knew THE SHINING was a horror flick, but it didn't bother me, psycho husband/dad,  blood, axes and all. 

STIR CRAZY, even though at that age I didn't quite get all the humor of some of the jokes, I still got some chuckles out of it. 

HALLOWEEN III: SEASON OF THE WITCH quite disturbed me. It was actually the first  film of the HALLOWEEN franchise that I saw, not realizing that, aside from SEASON OF THE WITCH, a certain William Shatner masked character is actually the dominating character of the trilogy.

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My parents time and time again made questionable film choices for my sisters and I to see. They took us to see THE CONVERSATION ( I was the youngest at 8, my sisters and I are 2 years apart.) I had nightmares of bloody rags in the toilet for weeks! My mother was doing the monkey "see no evil, speak no evil, hear no evil", trying to cover our eyes and ears during the traumatic scenes. :DThey took us to see THE EXORCIST and for my 13th birthday, they took us to see MIDNIGHT EXPRESS, which we eventually left because of the violence. We still joke with my dad about it today and he laughs.

The also took us to see WHAT'S NEW PUSSYCAT at the Sat night drive-in ( I think it was the ten year anniversary.) That film really confused me!

I don't know how we weren't stopped, as I believe all these films are rated R? I think in those days they allowed the entry of minors as long as they were accompanied by an adult.

My husband and I tried to take our 15-year-old to see THIRTEEN in 2003. The film was rated R and they wouldn't even let her in with us . Odd, because I felt that was exactly the type of film someone her age needed to see. 

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1 minute ago, sagebrush said:

I don't know how we weren't stopped, as I believe all these films are rated R? I think in those days they allowed the entry of minors as long as they were accompanied by an adult.

My husband and I tried to take our 15-year-old to see THIRTEEN in 2003. The film was rated R and they wouldn't even let her in with us . Odd, because I felt that was exactly the type of film someone her age needed to see. 

I would have raised hell seeing as how an R rating does not grant them the right to bar you and your children from entry, regardless of age. An R rating restricts an unaccompanied child from entry, but with a parent or guardian, they are allowed. Only an NC-17 completely restricts anyone under 17 from entry. 

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1 minute ago, LawrenceA said:

I would have raised hell seeing as how an R rating does not grant them the right to bar you and your children from entry, regardless of age. An R rating restricts an unaccompanied child from entry, but with a parent or guardian, they are allowed. Only an NC-17 completely restricts anyone under 17 from entry. 

I didn't know that fact! We just left the theatre. We eventually watched it with her on DVD, so she did see it.

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The family went to a drive in to see a war film,   Mash when I was around 10.    I recall my mom yelling at my dad that this wasn't a war film!!!     

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4 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

I would have raised hell seeing as how an R rating does not grant them the right to bar you and your children from entry, regardless of age. An R rating restricts an unaccompanied child from entry, but with a parent or guardian, they are allowed. Only an NC-17 completely restricts anyone under 17 from entry. 

Yes, whoever barred you from entry clearly didn't know the law! On the opposite end of the spectrum, I'm exhausted with going to R-rated or extra-intense PG-13 movies only to find parents have brought children ages eight or under with them. Sometimes crying infants. Civility in movie theaters is loooong dead.

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I wanted to put a laughing emoji on James' post, but I click and click and click and nothing happens. Anyone else having this problem?

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7 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

I wanted to put a laughing emoji on James' post, but I click and click and click and nothing happens. Anyone else having this problem?

I never have a problem laughing at James' posts. :ph34r:

(Just kidding!)

((I clicked on the laughing emoji and it worked fine for me. Occasionally I have to click on them more than once for it to take, though.))

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32 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

I wanted to put a laughing emoji on James' post, but I click and click and click and nothing happens. Anyone else having this problem?

What was going on between my parents was just as entertaining as the film!   E.g.  my mom saying things like 'this film just exposed them to the f-word (said in all of its glory) and my dad saying back 'if they didn't notice that before,  they sure did now!'.

 

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The two instances of this sort of thing that come readily to my mind:

Psycho (1960)...about a year or so after it's initial release and when I was about 9 or 10. Didn't get much sleep later that night as I recall.

Walk on the Wide Side (1962)...upon its initial release at age 10. My father and I went to go see some other film at the local movie theater and which I'm sure was more "family friendly", but the evening we got there that other movie's run was over the previous day, and so Pop asked me if I wanted to see this one instead and now that it was playing there. Guess Pop didn't know the storyline of this one consisted of a pretty racy for its day tale set in a 1930's New Orleans bordello. I remember asking him why that older lady (Barbara Stanwyck) who ran the place wouldn't let that younger french actress with only one name (Capucine) leave and go away with that guy who talked with one of the strangest accents I had ever heard. He sounded kind'a like a Texan AND British all at the same time (Laurence Harvey here, of course). Hmmm, ya know, I can't quite remember how he might have attempted to explain Lesbianism to me.

Yep, I remember thinking I got myself a "worldly education" THAT night, alright.

(...I also remember Pop telling me afterward that once we got home to not tell my Mom that we had just watched this movie)

 

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I sometimes cut school when I was quite young. Because in those days you couldn't be seen on the streets of the Bronx on school days (strangers would say "Why aren't you in school?"), I often went to the movies, at the tender age of about eleven. Two movies I distinctly remember being above my age grade were The Rat Race and A Cold Wind in August.

On the other hand, my friends and I went to see Two Women around that time, and we didn't have a problem with that!

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As a preteen, I saw several movies I wasn't supposed to see, like The French Connection, Ryan's Daughter, Cabaret, Deliverance, Midnight Cowboy, Johnny Got His Gun, and The Last Picture Show. I also saw The Godfather because it was a fundraiser for our school.

I was very surprised my friends and I could get in and saw The Exorcist. I loved the movie, I loved being scared senseless and I do remember some people walking out of the theater.

It wasn't very difficult to go see adult movies back then, I guess. I saw a lot of them before I turned 18: The Godfather II, Taxi Driver, The Last Detail, Serpico, Midnight Express, Women in Love, Cries and Whispers, La Grande Bouffe, Night Porter, Lenny, etc.

My friends and I saw a lot of giallo and horror and movies with lots of nudity; even soft porn, like Emmanuelle and Histoire D'O.

I was still in Secondary school when a friend and I went to see an X-rated, semi-explicit movie about Xaviera Hollander. The theater was packed with people that everybody knew in the city!

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48 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

What was going on between my parents was just as entertaining as the film!   E.g.  my mom saying things like 'this film just exposed them to the f-word (said in all of its glory) and my dad saying back 'if they didn't notice that before,  they sure did now!'.

 

I clicked ha ha on this post like 15 times in rapid succession and got a message I'd never seen before saying, "Sorry, but there was a problem reacting to this content" and my only option was to click "OK", but after I did so, a laughing emoji finally appeared.

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My exposure to inappropriate movies was mostly from tv. The university had an educational channel (this was in the days before PBS) with a mixed-bag of lectures, documentaries, and movies. TV viewing in our home was strictly limited, but I could watch as much of that channel as I wanted because it was labeled educational.

The big thing for me was, they considered any foreign film to be of cultural interest simply because it was foreign, and if it was more than 20 years old, they thought it was a classic. It probably wasn't in their budget to get movies intended for international release, so the movies bowed only to their own country's censorship laws.

Those movies were my introduction to the wonderful world of women's bodies. Since Europe wasn't as puritanical as Hollywood, the obligatory woman-changing-clothes scenes didn't stop at bras and panties. I was too young to understand the sexual nature of what I was seeing, I just knew what I liked.

Since the daytime schedule for that channel was never very accurate, I'd sometimes tune in and watch documentaries, hoping one of those movies would be shown next. I've always wondered how much I inadvertently learned while waiting to watch a woman strip.

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I was 6 years old and lived in old Victorian house. I saw The Changeling with George C. Scott and I was convinced that the child ghost was going to come up out of the floor in my bedroom and take me away or something. I think I slept with the lights on for at least 2 weeks afterwards.

I still think it's one of the best ghost story movies ever made.

 

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I was 6 years old when my parents took me with them to see Patton.  I was bored as hell but I remember being entertained by all of the cursing George C. Scott did. Which was rather tame by today's standards lots of bastards and son of a ****es.  ?

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I don't know how they didn't stop my parents from allowing my sister and I, then under 12. to see An Anatomy of Murder,  then billed for "Adults Only" no one under 17 admitted but we did.  I was able to follow the story perfectly with my eleven year old mind and yes I found it kind of raunchy. 

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Ah!  Thank GOD for you, Im4movies2.  I was beginning to think( considering the movies mentioned here by other members and the ages they claimed to be when they were considered too young to see them) that this place was being overrun by millennials!  :o

Sepiatone

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On 6/30/2018 at 11:44 AM, MotherofZeus said:

So, I suspect this topic may have been posted before because this community is just so comprehensive. Yet, I can't find it. 

My mother was a single mother when I was born smack dab in 1970.  Add to that my granny was very dedicated to art influencing me. Consequently, I was exposed to a great deal that other kids may not have been exposed to at an early age.  As it relates to movies, here is my list of movies I shouldn't have seen with the corresponding age. I am leaving out the Noir movies I watched late at night as an insomniac, the movies my babysitters let me watch, and the great, age appropriate classics I saw as well.

I'd love to hear folks stories of similar shenanigans. I'm happy to discuss mine in more detail but would like to get others' takes. Again, please direct me to the topic space if I am rehashing old territory. 

Please also feel free to venture into a discussion of what or how to determine age appropriateness because a) I still am freaked out by stupid things based on early exposure but also b) I had intelligent people around me providing context, historical and cultural relativity, and open discussion regarding anything I wanted to know or say. That was the up side, and it made me a smarter person for it.

Here's my long and distinguished list:

Poseiden Adventure: I was 2 and I do remember. Coma: I was 8. A Clockwork Orange: I was one, so I can't remember it -- but, come on! Tommy: I was 4.  Jaws:  I was 5.  Animal House: I was 8.  Don't Be Afraid of the Dark: I was 3. Saturday Night Fever: I was 7. Personal Best: I was 12. Marathon Man: I was 6. The Towering Inferno: I was 4 (not yet 5 but close). Invasion of the Body Snatchers: I was 8. Looking for Mr. Goodbar: I was 7.  No, my mother didn't take me to it, but I was at a drive-in. We'd gone to see Darby O'Gill and the Little People, but guess what was showing one screen over and guess which one I saw more of? Life of Brian: I was 9. Midnight Express: I was 8. History of the World Part 1: I was 11.  A Little Romance: I was 9. Lenny: I was 4. Alien: I was 9.  The Silent Partner: I was 8. Monty Python and the Holy Grail: I was 5. Earthquake: I was 4. Eyes of Laura Mars: I was 8. Taxi Driver: I was 6. The Seven-Per-Cent Solution: I was 6. The Last Detail: I was 3.  Tess: I was 9. The Prisoner of 2nd Avenue: I was 5. Cabaret: I was 2 -- and I do remember. The Deep -- I was 7. Freebie and the Bean: I was 4.  Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band: I was 8. A Special Day: I was 7. Pretty Baby:  I was 8. Lipstick: I was 7. Shampoo: I was 5. Madame Rosa: I was 7. Harry and Tonto: I was 4. Deliverance: I was 2 and I do remember.  Serpico: I was 3. Soylent Green: I was 4. Ben: I was 2 but I think I saw it  as a rerun before I was 6. Little Darlings I was 10.

 

Anyone else out there????

 

 

Wow, girl! You saw "Clockwork Orange" at eight years of age? You must have been the most precocious child in the neighborhood. Oh, wait...you said at one. I got mixed up in the order.

I've seen every single movie you mention, but of course not at those ages. I will ask though if in general a lot of them just went way over your head in terms of sexual details and such? Which one really do you remember as being perhaps upsetting, if you don't mind me asking?

I would stay up and watch old movies with my mother, so did see some things probably for more mature audiences but had her there to comment on them to me, so I learned some valuable adult knowledge that way. For example, by watching movies about married adults where the male spouse was cheating on the other at age six, I was not deluded as a teenager to think all boys were wonderful and would treat you well, but knew that some of them would turn out to be like those cheating men in the movies! Of course, sometimes it was the wife who cheated, so I was also on to the fact that women can be serious rats too and are not always to be trusted...haha!

I don't really have any bad experiences with seeing things in films that alarmed me, but that may be due to my insufferable non-belief that anything real is ever happening in a film. I'm not very impressionable and even something like "The Exorcist" didn't scare me an iota, as all I was thinking about watching it was that the music of Tubular Bells was very effective and so were the special effects.

Great post though and you are such a wonderful addition to the TCM board!

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