SteveQL

Please add SD versions ASAP.

12 posts in this topic

In ON  DEMAND the movie "HARPER" is only available in HD so I can't watch on my SD TV.  Please add SD version ASAP. 

And, I just now tried to watch "FOOTSTEPS IN THE DARK". It too is in HD only.  So, again, I can't watch on my SD TV.

When will this be corrected?  All titles in ON DEMAND have historically been in both SD and HD versions.

I sent same to CONTACT US which never responds.

Will TCM resolve or should I contact by Cable provider?

Thank you,

 

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On 7/4/2018 at 11:14 AM, SteveQL said:

In ON  DEMAND the movie "HARPER" is only available in HD so I can't watch on my SD TV.  Please add SD version ASAP. 

And, I just now tried to watch "FOOTSTEPS IN THE DARK". It too is in HD only.  So, again, I can't watch on my SD TV.

When will this be corrected?  All titles in ON DEMAND have historically been in both SD and HD versions.

I sent same to CONTACT US which never responds.

Will TCM resolve or should I contact by Cable provider?

Thank you,

 

I cautiously (and hesitatingly) reply to this Really bizarre scenario....
In one thread you complain that movies are not available in "HD" from your cable TV Provider, so you are unable to watch them on your HDTV; and in another you complain that they are not available in "SD" from your cable provider (Comcast), so you are unable to view them on your SD (CRT) TV.
And in other threads you complain about your TV Service Provider (Comcast's) ever diminishing list of their On-Demand TCM content...
While in still other threads you complain about your TV Service Provider (Comcast) broadcasting their movies in either "Letter-box" or "Match-box" format???

As far as I am aware, TCM only streams their movies in "Standard Definition" (480).
This has remained the case since 1994, when all of their signals were analog.
Even today, with the tiny handful of older movies that actually have been digitally remastered and converted to "High Definition," and which are currently commercially available in "true HD" (DVD or Blu-ray) format (be that 720p, 1080p, or 2K) are still being transmitted and streamed by TCM in SD 480p or i signals. 

Prior to the 2005 Digital Transition Mandate, all U.S. TV signals were analog, and all U.S. stations broadcast in 480 "Standard Definition."
The deadline for Digital implementation was 2009, however a few stations were in "compliance" before that, while others required more time.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_television_transition_in_the_United_States

In 2005 the HD "standard" was considered 720p, and SD 480p signals could be "up-scaled" to 720i.
By 2009, the HD "standard" was 1080p, and 720p signals could be "up-scaled" to 1080i.
Since then "HD" has reached (and surpassed) 2k, 4k, and even 8k, though very few stations (if any) offer content in those "Ultra-High" definitions.
However, one can stream some of the more recent HD conversions from a few on-line providers such as PBS, Netflix, YouTube, and Amazon, etc. in up to 720p, and 1080p (and a very few in 2k).

But the overwhelming majority of what TCM broadcasts pre-dates 2005, and currently resides on actual film and/or analog restoration "Masters".
Likewise, most of TCM's content has not (yet) undergone digital remastering to anything greater than 480p ("Standard Definition"), and many of their transmissions are still analog-to-digital signal conversions.
So it has been TCM's long standing policy to broadcast and stream in SD, even when a few of the older movies actually have been remastered and converted to HD.
(To date, only a relative few of the older "classic" movies have been re-scanned and converted to the latest Higher Definition digital levels.)

Case in point, HARPER (1966) was digitally remastered into a HD Blu-ray conversion, and made available for commercial purchase in that format earlier this year (2/27/2018). However the recent TCM broadcast and WATCH TCM ON-DEMAND stream was still in SD format. 
FOOTSTEPS IN THE DARK (1941) has NOT yet been digitally remastered in true HD. And the recent TCM  broadcast and WATCH TCM ON-DEMAND stream was still in SD (480). 

Broadcasters, Station channels and many on-line streaming services have the technical capability to "up-scale" original SD signals and offer them to their customers in a higher definition (generally 720i or 1080i) but, unless the original format is 720p or 1080p (or 2k plus) this is not "true" HD, simply an "up-scaled" signal conversion
WATCH TCM may eventually up-scale their signals as well, but for now (I believe) their transmissions are still in SD 480 (as is the vast majority of their content). 

"True" Higher Definition signals use much more bandwidth than those in Standard Definition, or those which have been "interlaced" or "up-scaled" to "appear" in HD.
"High Definition" is ever evolving and has no "official" standard (today 720-1080p is still referred to as HD, even though "Ultra HD" technology exists (with growing levels of content).
Higher (wider, broader) Bandwidth translates into higher cost in dollars, which is why most TV providers still broadcast the majority of their content in SD, or use SD-to-"HD" "up-scaling" technology (because it is cheaper than transmitting in "true HD").
So, when a customer selects an "HD" movie channel from their TV Service Provider (unless the programing was originally produced in HD) what they often are actually seeing is an "up-scaled" HD "conversion" on their HDTV screens.

The old CRT TVs were more forgiving of noticable resolution differences between SD and HD, as they were originally designed for an a abundance of 4:3 aspect ratio film content, delivered by analog signals (in Standard Resolution) to their relatively small screens.
Today's flat screen digital panels are generally much larger, and ever more are being purchased in the latest "Ultra" HDTV category (with relatively little native UHDTV content currently available).
Large 2k-8k resolution widescreens are much more sensitive to revealing the difference in lower resolutions, with far fewer native pixels.
And current "up-scale" and De-interlacing" technology is not (yet) capable of rendering lower resolution pictures on these larger (>32") HDTV screens to a degree where consumers are not visibly aware of such differences.
Consumers readily notice the difference between viewing a "true HD" Blue-ray, and then watching TV programing that has either been transmitted via an "up-scaled" signal, or in native SD format.
Without an understanding the technology, consumers readily become "dissatisfied" and clamor for "HD" channels and "HD" content to be viewed on their large, expensive, HDTV and Ultra HDTV.

In the "old" days, persons were more content to stay at home and watch "old" movies and TV shows on their "tiny" B&W (and later color) CRT TV screens.
That is why movie producers began shooting ever more movies in wider screen formats, with stereophonic sound... to get people out of their homes and back into the theaters again.
Today, persons want to sit at home and have that movie "theater" experience on their super large, Ultra HDTVs, with surround sound...
But most do not realize the vast resolution quality difference between "adaptable" analog film, projected onto a screen, and the relatively "unforgiving rigid" nature of today's prevalent digital image technology.
And so, without fully comprehending "why," many of today's consumers have inadvertently set themselves up to become dissatisfied.  

Movies filmed in 4:3 aspect ratio will fill an older analog SD CRT 4:3 ratio TV screen, but when viewed on a 16:9 ratio HDTV there will be "pillar-boxing"  (vertical black bars on either side of the picture).
Movies filmed in 16:9 aspect ratio, will completely fill a 16:9 ratio monitor, but on a 4:3 ratio screen there will be "letter-boxing" (horizontal black bars above and below the picture).
And movies filmed in wider Panavision 2.20:1 aspect ratio (post 1953 productions), or even wider CinemaScope, will appear "letter-boxed" on 16:9 ratio screens (and severely "letter-boxed" on 4:3 ratio TV screens). 
But any movie presented in "Window-boxed" (aka "Match-Box") format (with black bars on all four sides), appearing with severely distorted, widened, and squashed figures, is due to either a "re-edited" and embedded video source, or a "reformatting" calibration software/hardware equipment transmission error.
To be clear (depending upon the TV screens aspect ratio) "Pillar-boxing" and "Letter-boxing" format is normal, whereas the above described "Window-boxing" and "Match-box" format is NOT.

TCM apparently never responds to it's viewers about anything (at least not yet).
But if they did (in this case), they would likely say that their signals are uniformly transmitted in digital SD these days, and blame your SD-HD problems on your TV Service Provider. 
Your TV Service Provider will also likely blame TCM, or their movie provider "vendors" (whomever they are), but it is my opinion that your varying SD-"HD" content from Comcast (as far as TCM is concerned) is due to problems at Comcast's "up-scaling" and transmission end.
And your TV Service Provider's limited On-Demand movie selection (regarding TCM) is likely due to some internal contract dispute between Comcast and TCM.

I have said all of this before, in other threads, so this is a less detailed re-iteration, with the hope that perhaps it will maybe "click" this time. 

Regardless, waiting for TCM to resolve anything is quite apparently fruitless.
So contacting your Comcast cable provider is likely your last "best" resort for any resolution to your "apparent" Comcast TV Provider problems.

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Solution: Just ignore my posts. 

My HD TV is in the living room. CRT SD TV in bedroom.  So If I try to watch a movie on Demand in SD (on bedroom TV) and its only on HD I must go out to the living room to watch.  Other way around, if only SD version then won't watch on HD TV.

-----------------------

As for the SNAKE PIT out of sync I believe you cited.  I confirmed and posted to my providers forum.  But, since last day for subject title (TCM ends it July 8). I expect no resolution.

Again, ignore my posts.  I'm no doubt too picky for what I pay and expect on cable TV and TCM content. And, have received until recently (about time WarnerMedia evolved)

Please accept my apology! And, once again ignore my picky posts

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Posted (edited)

 

MONKEY  BUSINESS (1931) aired Wednesday July 11 but STILL only SD version is in ON DEMAND UNTIL JULY 18.  I just tried to watch but impossible due to too small (postage stamp) 

PLEASE DOWNLOAD THE HD VERSION.  IF NOT, WHY NOT?

Edited by SteveQL
When pasting mssed move title

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On 7/8/2018 at 3:26 PM, Stephan55 said:

I cautiously (and hesitatingly) reply to this Really bizarre scenario....
In one thread you complain that movies are not available in "HD" from your cable TV Provider, so you are unable to watch them on your HDTV; and in another you complain that they are not available in "SD" from your cable provider (Comcast), so you are unable to view them on your SD (CRT) TV.
And in other threads you complain about your TV Service Provider (Comcast's) ever diminishing list of their On-Demand TCM content...
While in still other threads you complain about your TV Service Provider (Comcast) broadcasting their movies in either "Letter-box" or "Match-box" format???

As far as I am aware, TCM only streams their movies in "Standard Definition" (480).
This has remained the case since 1994, when all of their signals were analog.
Even today, with the tiny handful of older movies that actually have been digitally remastered and converted to "High Definition," and which are currently commercially available in "true HD" (DVD or Blu-ray) format (be that 720p, 1080p, or 2K) are still being transmitted and streamed by TCM in SD 480p or i signals. 

Prior to the 2005 Digital Transition Mandate, all U.S. TV signals were analog, and all U.S. stations broadcast in 480 "Standard Definition."
The deadline for Digital implementation was 2009, however a few stations were in "compliance" before that, while others required more time.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_television_transition_in_the_United_States

In 2005 the HD "standard" was considered 720p, and SD 480p signals could be "up-scaled" to 720i.
By 2009, the HD "standard" was 1080p, and 720p signals could be "up-scaled" to 1080i.
Since then "HD" has reached (and surpassed) 2k, 4k, and even 8k, though very few stations (if any) offer content in those "Ultra-High" definitions.
However, one can stream some of the more recent HD conversions from a few on-line providers such as PBS, Netflix, YouTube, and Amazon, etc. in up to 720p, and 1080p (and a very few in 2k).

But the overwhelming majority of what TCM broadcasts pre-dates 2005, and currently resides on actual film and/or analog restoration "Masters".
Likewise, most of TCM's content has not (yet) undergone digital remastering to anything greater than 480p ("Standard Definition"), and many of their transmissions are still analog-to-digital signal conversions.
So it has been TCM's long standing policy to broadcast and stream in SD, even when a few of the older movies actually have been remastered and converted to HD.
(To date, only a relative few of the older "classic" movies have been re-scanned and converted to the latest Higher Definition digital levels.)

Case in point, HARPER (1966) was digitally remastered into a HD Blu-ray conversion, and made available for commercial purchase in that format earlier this year (2/27/2018). However the recent TCM broadcast and WATCH TCM ON-DEMAND stream was still in SD format. 
FOOTSTEPS IN THE DARK (1941) has NOT yet been digitally remastered in true HD. And the recent TCM  broadcast and WATCH TCM ON-DEMAND stream was still in SD (480). 

Broadcasters, Station channels and many on-line streaming services have the technical capability to "up-scale" original SD signals and offer them to their customers in a higher definition (generally 720i or 1080i) but, unless the original format is 720p or 1080p (or 2k plus) this is not "true" HD, simply an "up-scaled" signal conversion
WATCH TCM may eventually up-scale their signals as well, but for now (I believe) their transmissions are still in SD 480 (as is the vast majority of their content). 

"True" Higher Definition signals use much more bandwidth than those in Standard Definition, or those which have been "interlaced" or "up-scaled" to "appear" in HD.
"High Definition" is ever evolving and has no "official" standard (today 720-1080p is still referred to as HD, even though "Ultra HD" technology exists (with growing levels of content).
Higher (wider, broader) Bandwidth translates into higher cost in dollars, which is why most TV providers still broadcast the majority of their content in SD, or use SD-to-"HD" "up-scaling" technology (because it is cheaper than transmitting in "true HD").
So, when a customer selects an "HD" movie channel from their TV Service Provider (unless the programing was originally produced in HD) what they often are actually seeing is an "up-scaled" HD "conversion" on their HDTV screens.

The old CRT TVs were more forgiving of noticable resolution differences between SD and HD, as they were originally designed for an a abundance of 4:3 aspect ratio film content, delivered by analog signals (in Standard Resolution) to their relatively small screens.
Today's flat screen digital panels are generally much larger, and ever more are being purchased in the latest "Ultra" HDTV category (with relatively little native UHDTV content currently available).
Large 2k-8k resolution widescreens are much more sensitive to revealing the difference in lower resolutions, with far fewer native pixels.
And current "up-scale" and De-interlacing" technology is not (yet) capable of rendering lower resolution pictures on these larger (>32") HDTV screens to a degree where consumers are not visibly aware of such differences.
Consumers readily notice the difference between viewing a "true HD" Blue-ray, and then watching TV programing that has either been transmitted via an "up-scaled" signal, or in native SD format.
Without an understanding the technology, consumers readily become "dissatisfied" and clamor for "HD" channels and "HD" content to be viewed on their large, expensive, HDTV and Ultra HDTV.

In the "old" days, persons were more content to stay at home and watch "old" movies and TV shows on their "tiny" B&W (and later color) CRT TV screens.
That is why movie producers began shooting ever more movies in wider screen formats, with stereophonic sound... to get people out of their homes and back into the theaters again.
Today, persons want to sit at home and have that movie "theater" experience on their super large, Ultra HDTVs, with surround sound...
But most do not realize the vast resolution quality difference between "adaptable" analog film, projected onto a screen, and the relatively "unforgiving rigid" nature of today's prevalent digital image technology.
And so, without fully comprehending "why," many of today's consumers have inadvertently set themselves up to become dissatisfied.  

Movies filmed in 4:3 aspect ratio will fill an older analog SD CRT 4:3 ratio TV screen, but when viewed on a 16:9 ratio HDTV there will be "pillar-boxing"  (vertical black bars on either side of the picture).
Movies filmed in 16:9 aspect ratio, will completely fill a 16:9 ratio monitor, but on a 4:3 ratio screen there will be "letter-boxing" (horizontal black bars above and below the picture).
And movies filmed in wider Panavision 2.20:1 aspect ratio (post 1953 productions), or even wider CinemaScope, will appear "letter-boxed" on 16:9 ratio screens (and severely "letter-boxed" on 4:3 ratio TV screens). 
But any movie presented in "Window-boxed" (aka "Match-Box") format (with black bars on all four sides), appearing with severely distorted, widened, and squashed figures, is due to either a "re-edited" and embedded video source, or a "reformatting" calibration software/hardware equipment transmission error.
To be clear (depending upon the TV screens aspect ratio) "Pillar-boxing" and "Letter-boxing" format is normal, whereas the above described "Window-boxing" and "Match-box" format is NOT.

TCM apparently never responds to it's viewers about anything (at least not yet).
But if they did (in this case), they would likely say that their signals are uniformly transmitted in digital SD these days, and blame your SD-HD problems on your TV Service Provider. 
Your TV Service Provider will also likely blame TCM, or their movie provider "vendors" (whomever they are), but it is my opinion that your varying SD-"HD" content from Comcast (as far as TCM is concerned) is due to problems at Comcast's "up-scaling" and transmission end.
And your TV Service Provider's limited On-Demand movie selection (regarding TCM) is likely due to some internal contract dispute between Comcast and TCM.

I have said all of this before, in other threads, so this is a less detailed re-iteration, with the hope that perhaps it will maybe "click" this time. 

Regardless, waiting for TCM to resolve anything is quite apparently fruitless.
So contacting your Comcast cable provider is likely your last "best" resort for any resolution to your "apparent" Comcast TV Provider problems.

Fantastic post.

I have Comcast and almost never use their On-Demand. Instead, occasionally the DVR. New, smaller HD TVs are pretty low cost. That is one option. An HD TV should not have issues going backwards to SD. You will probably have to expand the image to fit the screen if in wide-screen or panavision. Otherwise a square image will fit okay. I watch INSP in SD daily. In my case, both my TV and X1 Comcast remote will modify the image size, to fill the screen. I watch Matlock which is in SD already.

If you really like the CRT, checkout the Roku Express+, which has A/V connections for SD, good old yellow, red and white. The Roku site claims it is only at Wal-Mart, but Amazon has everything, and you should also find it there for about $35. Then try out FilmStruck, or at least peek at their site for movies.

If your CRT doesn't have A/V inputs, Yikes! Then it is old. It is possible to get an adapter from A/V to coax, but I'd spend that cash on a modest flat screen.

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Sorry for my apparent  simplistic bizarre scenario.   I don't care if its TCM or Comcast, or theories why titles on TCM's ON DEMAND are either SD and HD or merely only SD and not HD and vice-versa.  Check the list of titles for yourself.  Some in HD or SD only makes no sense TO ME.

In closing, and in comparison to TCM merely go to Premium channels:  HBO ON Demand , Showtime ON Demand, Starz and MAX and you will see each title offered in SD and HD versions. 

Please don't waste your valuable time protracting this bizarre scenario of which I sincerely apologize.

END OF MATTER!

SteveQL

 

 

 

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TODAY FROM MY PROVIDER CSR EMPLOYEE (also posted on website)

 

Apologies for the delay in responding.

 

I do see 59 titles available from TCM On Demand right now. Certainly, not all content from TCM is available On Demand. We provide the On Demand content (and in the format) that TCM provides to us.

TCM also provides a different offering of On Demand titles to video providers that what they offer via their Watch TCM website. http://www.tcm.com/watchtcm/films/?ecid=subnavmoviesondemand

There are other classic WB films are also available as On Demand options to rent or buy – but these WB titles are not provided by TCM On Demand.

The provider of the content is clearly labeled on each title screen.

Apologies for any confusion we may have caused.

 

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2 hours ago, SteveQL said:

TODAY FROM MY PROVIDER CSR EMPLOYEE (also posted on website)

  

Apologies for the delay in responding.

 

I do see 59 titles available from TCM On Demand right now. Certainly, not all content from TCM is available On Demand. We provide the On Demand content (and in the format) that TCM provides to us.

TCM also provides a different offering of On Demand titles to video providers that what they offer via their Watch TCM website. http://www.tcm.com/watchtcm/films/?ecid=subnavmoviesondemand

There are other classic WB films are also available as On Demand options to rent or buy – but these WB titles are not provided by TCM On Demand.

The provider of the content is clearly labeled on each title screen.

Apologies for any confusion we may have caused.

Typically vague CSR response, open to "interpretation" (or misinterpretation) by either sender or receiver. 

1) "I do see 59 titles available from TCM On Demand right now. Certainly, not all content from TCM is available On Demand."

Straight forward interpretation of this is "Duh," <_<  "we" should already know that only 85-90% of the total "live" content broadcast by TCM is made available via TCM's WATCH TCM ON-DEMAND streaming.

2)   "We (Comcast) provide the On Demand content (and in the format) that TCM provides to us."

Is this CSR referring to "format" as the Aspect Ratio (i.e. 4:3, 16:9, etc.) to include embedded errors such as "Window-box" (aka "Match-box,") etc.?
Or is the CSR referring to "format" as the Definition (i.e. SD, HD)?
Or is the CSR use of the term "format" all inclusive?  :unsure:
If so, that implies that TCM is sending the TV Service Providers On-Demand content in "formats" that could be very different from what they broadcast "live" or offer in TCM's own WATCH TCM ON-DEMAND website.
To verify this, "we" (or rather you) need the in-put from other posters who are watching On-Demand movies from different TV Service Providers, to see if this is unique to Comcast customers? Or a similar shared experience with other TV Service Provider customers?
My TV Service Provider (COX) doesn't appear to offer TCM in their list of On-Demand channels. So "we" (you) require additional in-put from others to confirm this one way or another. 

3)  "TCM also provides a different offering of On Demand titles to video providers that (than) what they offer via their Watch TCM website. http://www.tcm.com/watchtcm/films/?ecid=subnavmoviesondemand "

It appears as if the CSR is affirming the hypothesis that Comcast's contract with TCM does not allow Comcast to offer the same number of movies via Comcast's On-Demand service as what TCM makes available all subscribers via WATCH TCM ON-DEMAND.  That likely explains the Comcast On-Demand varying numbers discrepancy. 
Again, need additional input from others to determine if this is a "special" Comcast thing? Or if other TV Service Provider customers share this experience? 

4) "There are other classic WB films (that) are also available as (Comcast) On Demand options to rent or buybut these WB titles are not provided by TCM On Demand." 

No  S  H  I  T  Sherlock... <_<  Of course you can pay extra to get what you want, from sources other than TCM.
That has always been the case.
I avoid those additional charge "On-Demand" channel buttons like the plague.
If there is something that TCM broadcasts that may not be available on WATCH TCM ON-DEMAND, and I really want to watch it, I either DVR the "live" broadcast for later replay. Or seek it out from my library (for "free"). Or check out YouTube, or some other on-line source.
If it is unavailable for "free" viewing, and I simply can't live without seeing it, a Last resort is to pay for it via Amazon, or whomever.  


Another option that you "might" consider is checking out other TV Service Providers in your area.
If Comcast can't satisfy your needs, then perhaps somebody else can?

Again, just a suggestion... Take it or leave it. :rolleyes:

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I'm not wasting anymore of my time or yours on this matter.  I simply asked Comcast EMPLOYEE if TCM versions offered in HD and/or SD  is due to TCM or Comcast.  He posted on Comcast's forum under topic ON DEMAND. Why? Because other Comcast customers also asked. They also inquired why Comcast has only one HBO HD channel ---------- the rest are SD. Why do they complain?  I presume because SD versions don't fill their HD screens. All PBS channels do as do all news channels: MSNBC, CNN, Fox News etc.  Aforementioned channels also have SD versions. If they did not have HD versions I can easily predict what would happen to Comcast's subscribers base i.e. CUSTOMERS.

As for the films I have all on DVD and Blu-ray and even many on VCR tapes.   Too many!

End of matter for good.

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JUST ONE OF HUNDREDS OF POSTS RE HD CONTENT
 
Lack of HD Premium channel content

I hear all this talk of 4k rolling out yet the premium channels are not all in HD.  Directv and Dish have ALL THEIR PREMIUMS IN HD! Why is the HOme shopping network and the food channel in HD yet PAID PREMIUM SUBSCRIPTION channels are not? 

 

HBO East is not in HD.  (all the live events/shows ex Game of Thrones airs on HBO East before it airs on HBO West) I don't want to wait 3 hours to watch my favorite TV show in HD.  The same goes for all the other providers!  This is 2017!

 

Only 4 out of 12 HBO Channels are in HD.   (HBO go does not stream live content so don't try to tell me to authenticate via the APP)

Only 1 out of 7 Starz Channels is in HD.... (Starz does not even Xfinity as a listed provider for authentication!)

Only 1 out of Showtime Channels in HD

Only 1 out of 4 Cinemax Channels in HD

 

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5 hours ago, SteveQL said:

... I simply asked (a) Comcast EMPLOYEE if TCM versions offered in HD and/or SD  is due to TCM or Comcast. ...

And the Comcast CSR answer was as ambiguously clear as mud, wasn't it. 
 

5 hours ago, SteveQL said:

...  He posted on Comcast's forum under topic ON DEMAND. Why? Because other Comcast customers also asked. They also inquired why Comcast has only one HBO HD channel ---------- the rest are SD. Why do they complain?  I presume because SD versions don't fill their HD screens. All PBS channels do as do all news channels: MSNBC, CNN, Fox News etc.  Aforementioned channels also have SD versions. ...

1) A program (movie or regular broadcast) filmed (or digitally recorded) in 16:9 aspect ratio will fill a 16:9 ratio HDTV monitor (whether broadcast in HD or SD).
Whereas any generally older movie, or program filmed or recorded in 4:3 aspect ratio will be pillar-boxed on a 16:9 ratio HDTV. i.e. older (pre-1953) movies, older TV shows such as Twilight Zone, I Luv Lucy, what-have-you, etc.
Ideally, people should learn more about such things, and the limitations of digital technology and HDTV before they start complaining about this stuff!

2) NOT all PBS programing was filmed in widescreen, nor in HD.
I am a huge fan and supporter of PBS, and have been for decades. If you catch an earlier broadcast/recording (that hasn't been re-scanned and digitized) you will see that some of them were recorded in 4:3 aspect ratio, and most were (and still are in SD).
PBS has pretty well kept up with the times and the majority of their post 2009 programs have been digitally recorded in 720p HD, with a few in 1080p.
For the last couple of decades almost all of their independently produced programing has been recorded in widescreen aspect ratio. So these programs play well on smaller (=/< 32" HDTVs) and fill the screen on 16:9 ratio monitors. However they will appear "letter-boxed" on 4:3 aspect ratio TVs. 
Of course the latest programing on the current crop of "news" channels will be (and are) recorded in widescreen (generally 16:9 ratio) format. As for definition.... if not recorded in at least 720p they are easily up-scaled from SD or down-scaled from HD, to adapt to whatever monitor viewed on.

3) Most HDTV manufacturers apparently understand the limitations of HDTV technology, and have incorporated a host of viewing "settings" to allow a 4:3 ratio movie or program to artificially "fill" the screen. (i.e. Full screen mode, Widescreen mode, Zoom mode, Pan & Scan mode, etc.) sometimes the complete picture will not actually be shown (i.e. the top or sides of the picture may appear cropped, etc.), and sometimes (i.e. Widescreen mode) the picture may appear horizontally stretched, with "fatter" characters, etc., but these are necessary consumer compromises for those who simply can't stand to watch an older program in "pillar-boxed" format.
Likewise for wider screen movies that were originally produced in Panorama or CinemaScope, to be viewed without "letter-boxing" on a 16:9 ratio HDTV.

5 hours ago, SteveQL said:

If they did not have HD versions I can easily predict what would happen to Comcast's subscribers base i.e. CUSTOMERS. 

In some areas the competition for TV Service Provider subscribers can be fierce (that can be a good thing for for customers, as competition generally keeps prices lower and services higher.) But the flip side is that most TV Service providers are still using older technology (i.e. copper lines built for analog, some even utilizing existing telephone lines). Very few (if any) use all fiber optic broadband, and most use a combination of old and new technology as they gradually upgrade.
In my relatively rural community the "big dog" Telecommunication Provider is COX and while they have recently been upgrading to fiber optic transmission (receiver-to-node-to-customer) it's been for their high end business customers first. Residential customers are lagging far behind with COX's piecemeal "replace it only after it breaks" corporate mentality.
But this still gives COX the leeway to advertise that they are using the latest technology. As they are, it's just not available for the majority of their customers (yet?)
And they "overcharge" their customers, as all TV Service Providers and ISP's appear to do, while focusing on upgrading their larger (and more lucrative) metropolitan customer bases first.
Still, even in my area, they do have higher ISP speeds, larger data caps, and offer more consistent product than local competitors like AT&T's U-Verse, DIRECTV and DISH, and do so without locking a customer into a two plus year contract.
Who knows what Comcast's story is in this regard.

Point being is that all of these companies stretch the "truth" to "keep up" with each other, hoping to maintain and grow their customer base, based upon customer misinformation and ignorance. 

Case in point on how ludicrous a lot of this really is... Generation (G2, G3, G4, and G5) technology which every cell phone provider spouts like something really special, right?
In reality there is even less substance to it than "HD" as in HDTV. Because there really is no official standard, in either case it is all relational, meaning that something is Higher Definition when compared to an earlier, less HD technology. However when it comes to "Generational" (G) speed, etc. it is even more ambiguously nefarious. Because there is no "standard" or universal "Generation" reference point from which to make a legitimate comparison. It is all by individual company, and there are a helluva lot of them, and all use the same words with different meanings. 
For example When AT&T states they are employing the latest G5 technology, and have the widest and fastest G5 and G4 coverage, they are referring strictly to their own technology as compared to their previous G2 and G3 speeds and coverage etc.
It is a company "generation" and one companies G2 may be as good or surpass another companies G3, and so on. Same thing with Verizon, and Sprint, etc.
So consumers should be aware and beware of the fancy advertising that makes it sound like something is really fast and great.

Reminds me of a neighbor that I used to have who would park his shiny Corvette in his driveway and occasionally could be seen washing and waxing it with pride.
What most of us didn't realize until later is that this guy couldn't really afford a Corvette, so he purchased this full size fiberglass display shell, on a fancy frame, with real tires.
It looked like a sleek and speedy Corvette from a distance, but up close and personal there wasn't anything "real" inside, not even an engine.
The guy would wait until way after midnight and then push his "car" into the garage, and then pretend that he'd been on a road-trip.

Lesson here is when considering a cell phone service provider, or ISP, or TV Service Provider, it really pays to do a lot of comparative shopping, that should wisely include communicating with existing customers to see if everything that is advertised actually stands up to the hype.

5 hours ago, SteveQL said:

End of matter for good. 

Evidently not, as you continue to post about it. ;)

 

5 hours ago, SteveQL said:
JUST ONE OF HUNDREDS OF POSTS RE HD CONTENT
 
Lack of HD Premium channel content

I hear all this talk of 4k rolling out yet the premium channels are not all in HD.  Directv and Dish have ALL THEIR PREMIUMS IN HD! Why is the HOme shopping network and the food channel in HD yet PAID PREMIUM SUBSCRIPTION channels are not? 

 

HBO East is not in HD.  (all the live events/shows ex Game of Thrones airs on HBO East before it airs on HBO West) I don't want to wait 3 hours to watch my favorite TV show in HD.  The same goes for all the other providers!  This is 2017!

 

Only 4 out of 12 HBO Channels are in HD.   (HBO go does not stream live content so don't try to tell me to authenticate via the APP)

Only 1 out of 7 Starz Channels is in HD.... (Starz does not even Xfinity as a listed provider for authentication!)

Only 1 out of Showtime Channels in HD

Only 1 out of 4 Cinemax Channels in HD

I'm going to make an assumption that all of the above is still in reference to Comcast, right?

I will say this much about HBO, and Starz and Showtime...
Home Box Office (HBO) is the oldest and longest continuously operating pay tv service in the United States, having been in operation since November 8, 1972. It's programming consists primarily of theatrically released motion pictures and original television series, along with made-for-cable movies and documentaries, and occasional specials.

Showtime launched on July 1, 1976. And on March 7, 1978, Showtime became a nationally distributed service after it was up-linked to satellite, turning it into a competitor with HBO and other pay cable networks. Showtime's programming primarily includes theatrically released motion pictures and original television series, made-for-TV movies, and various special events.

Starz (originally named Encore) launched in April 1991. It's a premium cable and satellite television channel that is currently owned by Lions Gate Entertainment. It's programming features mainly older and recent theatrically released feature films, although some of its multiplex channels also carry acquired television series.

HBO and Showtime are original surviving members from the vanguard of the "pay-TV" movement. They ventured forth when "commercial" TV was "free" for the cost of a good rooftop antenna and a CRT TV. 
Back then, if you wanted HBO and Showtime, you had to have a giant satellite dish anchored in the back-yard.
Those days are long gone, but much of the original HBO and Showtime programing still exists on analog film, in the original aspect ratios, and in Standard Definition.
Some has been scanned and converted to digital and HD, but much has not. And HBO owns their original made-for-TV movies and series', so they don't have to lease them from someone else to show them.
But they may not re-show their entire library of older, original stuff in anything other than the original aspect ratio, and SD.

Then again, part of it may just be another Comcast issue.... :rolleyes:


I will say this Stever, if nothing else, the one certain thing that all your ranting has positively done for me, is that it has made me acutely aware of the failings of Comcast as a TV Service Provider.
If I am ever in a future situation where I'm in the market for a TV Service Provider, and Comcast is on the local provider list, I will unhesitatingly cross them out.
If they are the only one on that list, then I will "cord-cut" before becoming another one of their victimized customers...

So for that forewarning, I am in your gratitude, and I thank you, sir! :)

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