CaveGirl

Rock and Roll Extravaganzas

62 posts in this topic

13 hours ago, CaveGirl said:

You mean you didn't love seeing each member of Zep receive their summons to play music at their own little abode, like seeing Zoso at Loch Ness in the old home of Aleister Crowley? 

I find the then seen as narcississtic tendencies of the group, now to be camp to the utmost! But you are right, the criticism was well founded but Zep did not allow much concert footage ever to be done so at least we have this example of their excesses to enjoy. Thanks, Vautrin!

Since I haven't seen the film since, most of the fantasy sequences have thankfully been

erased from my mind.  I took a look at the Wiki entry on the movie and Zep were not

satisfied with some of the concert footage so they had a replica of the MSG stage built

in the recording studio and redid the parts they didn't like. John Paul Jones had had his

hair cut in the interim and had to wear a wig to match the look of the concert. I must

have had money to burn since I also bought the soundtrack album. Haven't listened to

it in ages.

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I took a History of Rock & Roll Class in college which a few years later made a Rolling Stone list of the 10 Biggest Blowoff Classes in American Universities. So, I'm a little embarrassed I made a B in it! Although I have to say in my own defense, the tests were all essay. A friend of mine took the same course the year it made the RS list, and the tests had changed to 80 per cent multiple choice/fill in the blank and 20 per cent short answer.

Anyway, we weren't given any heads up on what the one-question final was going to be, so there was no real way to study for it. The question was, "Is Madonna rock & roll? Defend your position by citing examples you've learned in this class." I guess the professor didn't like my answer, because I had an A going into the final, but was given a B for the semester. I actually really liked my answer and wish I had saved it. I said yes, because even though her music veered to the pop side of the spectrum (especially in those days), she embodied a rebellious spirit, a defiance of convention and a willingness to let her music and her image evolve, as opposed to a genre performer in say blues or country whose fans expect them to look and sound pretty much the same even 10 or 20 years later.

I think I took the class the same year Truth or Dare came out, and given that I called Madonna a rock & roll artist, I would also say this is a rock & roll movie! It's a very watchable combination of life on the road and backstage during a world tour (that part is all black & white) and performance footage (color). I found particularly touching Madonna's role as mother hen to her mostly male, mostly gay, really young troupe of dancers. Some cynics may say Warren Beatty gave the greatest performance of his career as Madonna's prickly boyfriend. An interesting scene has Madonna scheming like a teenage girl to meet and possibly seduce Antonio Banderas, which turns out to be a letdown for her. And when Madonna and her posse play the titular game, Sandra Bernhard (whatever happened to her?) asks her who the true love of her life was, and maybe the most human I've ever seen Madonna be, she very quietly says, "Sean". And that's the only time he gets mentioned in the movie. I've read she pressed director Alek Kesishian to take it out, but she had given him creative control and couldn't force him to.

The performance numbers are all eye-catching, though they're the least rock & roll thing about Madonna, being structured and coreographed to the nth dregree, they're more like seeing a Broadway show than a rock concert.

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On 7/7/2018 at 11:22 PM, Vautrin said:

Since I haven't seen the film since, most of the fantasy sequences have thankfully been

erased from my mind.  I took a look at the Wiki entry on the movie and Zep were not

satisfied with some of the concert footage so they had a replica of the MSG stage built

in the recording studio and redid the parts they didn't like. John Paul Jones had had his

hair cut in the interim and had to wear a wig to match the look of the concert. I must

have had money to burn since I also bought the soundtrack album. Haven't listened to

it in ages.

It went down like a zeppelin, as Keith Moon would have said and most film reviewers did!

Zep had pretty much reached a peak of largesse by this point, and was roundly criticized for the self-indulgent nature of the project. But who cares...seeing it now is fun. I will have to watch it again to look for John Paul Jones wig! Thanks for that bit of wonderful trivia, Vautrin.

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On 7/7/2018 at 3:19 AM, ChristineHoard said:

Woodstock and Monterrey Pop are classic rock docs.

Bought that "Monterey Pop" set years ago and it still is fun to watch.

 

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On 7/7/2018 at 7:02 AM, arpirose said:

Here is another early banned record from THE DRIFTERS FEATURING CLYDE MC PHATTER 1954 HONEY LOVE. This was the good old 1950s full of repression that some people want to go back to?

 

 

Thank you so much, Arpirose! I love rehearing banned records and yes, this was a bit too suggestive for the defenders of morals at the time. Oddly enough though, its sentiments really are not too dissimilar from the McGuire Sisters and their song "Sugartime" but alas, black groups of the time and doo **** singers, got flack for any suggestive lyrics. No wonder stuff like "Work With Me Annie" by Hank Ballard and the Midnighters caused such an uproar.

Now often they do say "repression" can inspire folks to be more creative, so who knows why some might like a temporary return to the 1950's?

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7 hours ago, CaveGirl said:

It went down like a zeppelin, as Keith Moon would have said and most film reviewers did!

Zep had pretty much reached a peak of largesse by this point, and was roundly criticized for the self-indulgent nature of the project. But who cares...seeing it now is fun. I will have to watch it again to look for John Paul Jones wig! Thanks for that bit of wonderful trivia, Vautrin.

Yep, a lead zeppelin. Zep was one of those groups that the punks would likely criticize

for their extreme pompous over indulgence. Maybe the concert sequences suck too.

I haven't seen the film in years, though it would be hard to mess up the best of LZ's

songs. And then there are Jimmy Pages embroidered pants. Thank Wikipedia since I

hadn't heard about the reshoot, another prime example of let's spend a whole lotta

money for nothing, until I read about it in the Wiki article. 

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1 hour ago, CaveGirl said:

Thank you so much, Arpirose! I love rehearing banned records and yes, this was a bit too suggestive for the defenders of morals at the time. Oddly enough though, its sentiments really are not to dissimilar from the McGuire Sisters and their song "Sugartime" but alas, black groups of the time and doo **** singers, got flack for any suggestive lyrics. No wonder stuff like "Work With Me Annie" by Hank Ballard and the Midnighters caused such an uproar.

Now often they do say "repression" can inspire folks to be more creative, so who knows why some might like a temporary return to the 1950's?

So, you got bleeped by the TCM software too. I am thinking you must have made an Italian slur.

Later, there was "Annie Had A Baby," ... can't work no more.

I would likely get banned for mentioning a song by The Light Crust Doughboys. A kitty gets lost. They use Trump's favorite P word.

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31 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

Yep, a lead zeppelin. Zep was one of those groups that the punks would likely criticize

for their extreme pompous over indulgence. Maybe the concert sequences suck too.

I haven't seen the film in years, though it would be hard to mess up the best of LZ's

songs. And then there are Jimmy Pages embroidered pants. Thank Wikipedia since I

hadn't heard about the reshoot, another prime example of let's spend a whole lotta

money for nothing, until I read about it in the Wiki article. 

Yes, Zeppelin had reached a zenith that horrified some musical observers. And by putting things engraved on the inside ring of discs like "Do what thou wilt is the whole law" or whatever it was by Aleister Crowley, they started being criticized for being satanic and you know where that leads. All the aftermath with tragedies concerning Plant's progeny and inhaling vomit which can kill, seemed like fulfillment of the old Paganini myth about selling one's soul to the devil for some critics. I do give them total credit for not wanting to carry on without John Bonham just to make some bucks. Death in rock and roll can move one on to higher acclaim often though, or as someone said when Elvis died "Good career move."

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16 minutes ago, jimmymac71 said:

So, you got bleeped by the TCM software too. I am thinking you must have made an Italian slur.

Later, there was "Annie Had A Baby," ... can't work no more.

I would likely get banned for mentioning a song by The Light Crust Doughboys. A kitty gets lost. They use Trump's favorite P word.

And you are so right, even though I had not thought of Doo-you-know-what as a banned word!

Being interested in the origin of some rock and roll, we find the usage of sexual terms in old blues number prevalent in early songs of the 1950's. Uses of terms like "purses" or other articles that could be transmogrified into **** meanings were common in older songs by people like Nellie Lutcher or Bessie Smith.

Just like D. H. Lawrence would use terms like "sporran" in his novels that had double meanings, early rock and roll [the term itself having an underground sense] was littered with many such hidden street meanings in songs by folks like Robert Johnson and others. The fun is listening with an open ear and finding the subtext.

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1 hour ago, CaveGirl said:

Yes, Zeppelin had reached a zenith that horrified some musical observers. And by putting things engraved on the inside ring of discs like "Do what thou wilt is the whole law" or whatever it was by Aleister Crowley, they started being criticized for being satanic and you know where that leads. All the aftermath with tragedies concerning Plant's progeny and inhaling vomit which can kill, seemed like fulfillment of the old Paganini myth about selling one's soul to the devil for some critics. I do give them total credit for not wanting to carry on without John Bonham just to make some bucks. Death in rock and roll can move one on to higher acclaim often though, or as someone said when Elvis died "Good career move."

I think Page was the only one who was into the occult and who knows how seriously even

he took it. I always thought the whole selling your soul thing was pretty ridiculous in the

case of Zeppelin. I think it was more of the old **** happens idea, a much more pedestrian

explanation. And the music wasn't quite up to the early Zep standards as time wore on,

which is quite common, even with the best of bands. By the time time Bonzo died it was

time to give it up anyway. I just recalled something that always gave me a laugh--the small

black sculpture from the Presence album that seemed to hypnotize people in the album's

photos. Maybe an inside joke about the bombast of the whole Zep project. Then there's the

lack of credit given to blue's musicians in the early albums, but that's a topic for another

day. 

 

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18 hours ago, CaveGirl said:

And you are so right, even though I had not thought of Doo-you-know-what as a banned word!

Being interested in the origin of some rock and roll, we find the usage of sexual terms in old blues number prevalent in early songs of the 1950's. Uses of terms like "purses" or other articles that could be transmogrified into **** meanings were common in older songs by people like Nellie Lutcher or Bessie Smith.

Just like D. H. Lawrence would use terms like "sporran" in his novels that had double meanings, early rock and roll [the term itself having an underground sense] was littered with many such hidden street meanings in songs by folks like Robert Johnson and others. The fun is listening with an open ear and finding the subtext.

I enjoy reading your posts, even when I haven't a clue. I thought you were going with Doo-****. Maybe Doo-Wah-Diddie.

EDIT: Well, that didn't work. You know that really big burger at Burger King? Well, probably can't say that either.

I cannot tell a lie. Overall, getting very frustrated with all things TCM. FilmStruck may come sooner than I am planning for.

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I can't dispute or add to any of the "classics" mentioned so far.  I like practically all of them.  Especially the mid '50's ones in which the tired old cliche plotline of the "grown-ups" trying to stop the occurrence of some rock'n'roll show, or a dance in which rock'n'roll bands will appear.  And I too, disagree with Spence and others about the "greatness" of Alan Freed.

Yeah, sure, he did do a lot to PROMOTE rock'n'roll as a commercially valid genre, but despite all foolish legend("urban" legend, I'd say), he DID NOT coin the term "rock'n'roll".  That term for the music was used for YEARS before the music was thought of in that term, and LONG before Freed happened along the scene. But truly, it was ELVIS and all the other rock'n'roll artists who did the most in promoting and advancing rock'n'roll.

I'd also( and for some fun) add A HARD DAY'S NIGHT, HELP,  CATCH US IF YOU CAN, and THE LAST WALTZ to the list.  ;)  And a couple or so of those FRANKIE and ANNETTE "beach blanket" flicks featured rock recording artists of the time.

Sepiatone

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On 7/11/2018 at 6:09 PM, Vautrin said:

I think Page was the only one who was into the occult and who knows how seriously even

he took it. I always thought the whole selling your soul thing was pretty ridiculous in the

case of Zeppelin. I think it was more of the old **** happens idea, a much more pedestrian

explanation. And the music wasn't quite up to the early Zep standards as time wore on,

which is quite common, even with the best of bands. By the time time Bonzo died it was

time to give it up anyway. I just recalled something that always gave me a laugh--the small

black sculpture from the Presence album that seemed to hypnotize people in the album's

photos. Maybe an inside joke about the bombast of the whole Zep project. Then there's the

lack of credit given to blue's musicians in the early albums, but that's a topic for another

day. 

 

I have that album with many of the precursor versions of songs Zep used and somewhat revamped. People like John Lee Hooker, Leadbelly, Sonny Boy Williamson, Robert Johnson and others definitely were influences but I guess Zeppelin's records might have brought more attention to their earlier works. By the way, I just saw an episode of that pawnbroker show from Vegas where someone was trying to sell the "object" from Zeppelin album but it was in pretty poor shape. Just was sitting on the table, looking about the size of Spinal Tap's Stone Henge stage replica and all beat up from too much partying but not with red snappers! 

Sad...

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On 7/12/2018 at 11:15 AM, jimmymac71 said:

I enjoy reading your posts, even when I haven't a clue. I thought you were going with Doo-****. Maybe Doo-Wah-Diddie.

EDIT: Well, that didn't work. You know that really big burger at Burger King? Well, probably can't say that either.

I cannot tell a lie. Overall, getting very frustrated with all things TCM. FilmStruck may come sooner than I am planning for.

Doo-Wah-Diddy sounds like the new name of an old rapper, or a Shirley Temple retrospective with Bill Robinson.

Thanks for the kindness regarding reading my posts even when they are a bit obtuse! I could say I have "cloudy thought processes" but then that only makes me think of Guinn "Big Boy" Williams who always looked a bit pixilated in films, and in westerns. He was cute though and kind of looked like Brian Wilson. See...I've gone off the track again, Jimmy.

Speaking of Burger King, I always feel funny when I have to say on the outside speaker that I want a "Whopper". It has some weird connotations for sure. Here's hoping you don't leave us for Filmstruck totally, as I'd miss your input here. 

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37 minutes ago, CaveGirl said:

Doo-Wah-Diddy sounds like the new name of an old rapper, or a Shirley Temple retrospective with Bill Robinson.

Thanks for the kindness regarding reading my posts even when they are a bit obtuse! I could say I have "cloudy thought processes" but then that only makes me think of Guinn "Big Boy" Williams who always looked a bit pixilated in films, and in westerns. He was cute though and kind of looked like Brian Wilson. See...I've gone off the track again, Jimmy.

Speaking of Burger King, I always feel funny when I have to say on the outside speaker that I want a "Whopper". It has some weird connotations for sure. Here's hoping you don't leave us for Filmstruck totally, as I'd miss your input here. 

Well, someone seems to constantly put oil on our RR tracks. Reminds me of the song, "Viagra In The Water." I would do better finding a forum about old music versus old movies. In thinking real hard, I believe Bill Robinson is the guy Shirley tap dances with on the stairs. I didn't cheat and look it up.

Anytime you start a new thread, I read it. What the hey, I'm getting a free education.

Thanks! I won't leave all the way. So far, I get along with enough people and find the experience worth while. 

After a recent boo boo, I sometimes look to see the gender of a member. I can't just Crocodile Dundee it.

We all have pros and cons with TCM. I kind of think FilmStruck could be worth it. I am stuck with Xfinity for another year. I don't plan to do both channels at the same time.

I live with my mother who might not like me to turn her TV viewing upside down. Even for me, cutting the cord would be quite different.

I seldom use the DVR. I turn on TCM and may not like what they have showing. FilmStruck would not be that way. I haven't tried it yet, but do cruise the site sometimes. Looks like the host intros are an option. That solves another issue.

Because I think you will appreciate it, I will drop another song title for you. Checkout "The Woodbridge Dog Disaster." For something completely different, "The Talking Wheelchair Blues."

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25 minutes ago, jimmymac71 said:

Well, someone seems to constantly put oil on our RR tracks. Reminds me of the song, "Viagra In The Water." I would do better finding a forum about old music versus old movies. In thinking real hard, I believe Bill Robinson is the guy Shirley tap dances with on the stairs. I didn't cheat and look it up.

Anytime you start a new thread, I read it. What the hey, I'm getting a free education.

Thanks! I won't leave all the way. So far, I get along with enough people and find the experience worth while. 

After a recent boo boo, I sometimes look to see the gender of a member. I can't just Crocodile Dundee it.

We all have pros and cons with TCM. I kind of think FilmStruck could be worth it. I am stuck with Xfinity for another year. I don't plan to do both channels at the same time.

I live with my mother who might not like me to turn her TV viewing upside down. Even for me, cutting the cord would be quite different.

I seldom use the DVR. I turn on TCM and may not like what they have showing. FilmStruck would not be that way. I haven't tried it yet, but do cruise the site sometimes. Looks like the host intros are an option. That solves another issue.

Because I think you will appreciate it, I will drop another song title for you. Checkout "The Woodbridge Dog Disaster." For something completely different, "The Talking Wheelchair Blues."

"The Woodbridge Dog Disaster" sounds like the New Christy Minstrels would have it in their repetoire from playing it on "Hootenanny" and "The Talking Wheelchair Blues" would be a tribute by Dylan to Woody Guthrie on the Pig record label of unreleased masters? Okay, maybe not and I'll go check them out. 

I actually have an addiction to buying cover versions of famous songs, and the most fun ones are the ones by the worst artists. What could be more fun than hearing "Bob and Joe" do a vocal version of "Endless Sleep" and the Mysterians singing "Hats Off to Larry" in falsetto?

Glad to hear you are not leaving us for greener pastures. Please pardon abstruse references to strange movies and character actors, but I've lived a wasteful life watching too many films.

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6 hours ago, CaveGirl said:

I have that album with many of the precursor versions of songs Zep used and somewhat revamped. People like John Lee Hooker, Leadbelly, Sonny Boy Williamson, Robert Johnson and others definitely were influences but I guess Zeppelin's records might have brought more attention to their earlier works. By the way, I just saw an episode of that pawnbroker show from Vegas where someone was trying to sell the "object" from Zeppelin album but it was in pretty poor shape. Just was sitting on the table, looking about the size of Spinal Tap's Stone Henge stage replica and all beat up from too much partying but not with red snappers! 

Sad...

Eventually the boys made amends or were forced to do so by impending lawsuits, and gave

writing credits and back royalty payments to the artists they had ripped off. I've always

wondered why they did it. Neither the shared writing credits or the payments would have

done much to stop the band's momentum, and they were writing enough good material

on their own. I wonder if there were a number of objects, just like there were a number of

ruby slippers. I recall one episode where Rick sent Chumlee to get Bob Dylan, who was in

Vegas, to autograph a Dylan album. They just happened to meet (yeah, sure) and Chum

had Dylan autograph it to Chumlee, which lessened the value of the autograph. That

Stonehenge scene is one of my favorites. The tiny model comes down from above and

the, um, little people dance around it and are taller than it. 11 Funny.

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Not to excuse Zeppelin for cribbing off other's glory but I do think back in that time frame, it was pretty common for some rock groups to riff off of famous blues numbers without feeling like it was a total rip-off. 

Having anything addressed to Chumlee [sp?] would ruin it!

What a piker. I only liked the old man on the show and now he is dead. Sad, ain't it?

I'm in shock that Dylan would even offer to do this. Hopefully it was his "Nashville Skyline" album.

As for the Tapsters, I think when they descend to the level of being billed under a "Puppet Show" that it is the nadir of fame. The bit where they discuss the succumbing of some of their drummers, by electrocution or inhaling vomit is a high point for me, but seeing the little people running around Stone Henge and being taller than the pylons is a great scene. I also like when they get stuck in their pods on-stage.

I heard some horror stories like that once from a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee I knew, that were not much different from the stuff in "This is Spinal Tap". Probably where all these ideas come from like the Tap getting lost backstage just like Dylan was in "Don't Look Back". Thanks, Vautrin.

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I worked in FM radio during 1980, so "Fool In The Rain" was a favorite song. I am not finding Billboard Chart information for "Stairway To Heaven." I might be wrong, but is that the song without a chart history at the time? At 8 minutes long, most radio wouldn't play the whole thing. Back when "Spirit In The Sky" came out, it was considered long at 4 minutes. But that was 1970.

Love "Hats Off To Larry" and the birth of the synthesizer.

You get extra points for using addiction and songs in the same sentence, CaveGirl.

Our Larry, I've never actually called him that before, disagrees with me about Musicals. I am not a real Cagney fan. He doesn't sing any better than Ted Lewis, and I love Ted's music. But his dancing is the best.

Music is medicine.

Some songs are so fine, anyone could redo them and nail it. Checkout "At Last" by B.B. King and Diane Schuur. K.D. Lang could sing the phone book and I'd love it. There are times a remake of a song works better for me than the original, but that needs to be a different post, and maybe a different thread.

Going off track reminds me of "The Wreck Of The Old 97," from the Johnny Cash At San Quentin LP.

Now I have to toss this in, where Johnny has to change harmonicas faster than kiss a duck. Not my line, but Johnny's. Must have been the Folsom Prison LP.

 

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1 hour ago, CaveGirl said:

Not to excuse Zeppelin for cribbing off other's glory but I do think back in that time frame, it was pretty common for some rock groups to riff off of famous blues numbers without feeling like it was a total rip-off. 

Having anything addressed to Chumlee [sp?] would ruin it!

What a piker. I only liked the old man on the show and now he is dead. Sad, ain't it?

I'm in shock that Dylan would even offer to do this. Hopefully it was his "Nashville Skyline" album.

As for the Tapsters, I think when they descend to the level of being billed under a "Puppet Show" that it is the nadir of fame. The bit where they discuss the succumbing of some of their drummers, by electrocution or inhaling vomit is a high point for me, but seeing the little people running around Stone Henge and being taller than the pylons is a great scene. I also like when they get stuck in their pods on-stage.

I heard some horror stories like that once from a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee I knew, that were not much different from the stuff in "This is Spinal Tap". Probably where all these ideas come from like the Tap getting lost backstage just like Dylan was in "Don't Look Back". Thanks, Vautrin.

I agree that "borrowing" some old blues licks or parts of songs was likely SOP for some

groups back in the day. I remember coming across a website that detailed exactly which

Zeppelin songs contained these "borrowings" and from which songs and artists they were

taken. It seems Zep did indeed do it more liberally than other groups. I think Chumlee is

correct. I'm sure the meeting was set up and though I won't swear to it as it was some

time ago, to me it seems it was the Blonde on Blonde album that Dylan signed. Pawn Stars

is not as popular as it used to be, but I enjoyed watching it back in its prime. Chumlee got

a lucky break by knowing Corey since I doubt he would have achieved the minor fame he did

on his own. And the drummer died by swallowing vomit, but someone else's vomit. What a great

movie. 

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20 minutes ago, jimmymac71 said:

I worked in FM radio during 1980, so "Fool In The Rain" was a favorite song. I am not finding Billboard Chart information for "Stairway To Heaven." I might be wrong, but is that the song without a chart history at the time? At 8 minutes long, most radio wouldn't play the whole thing. Back when "Spirit In The Sky" came out, it was considered long at 4 minutes. But that was 1970.

Love "Hats Off To Larry" and the birth of the synthesizer.

You get extra points for using addiction and songs in the same sentence, CaveGirl.

Our Larry, I've never actually called him that before, disagrees with me about Musicals. I am not a real Cagney fan. He doesn't sing any better than Ted Lewis, and I love Ted's music. But his dancing is the best.

Music is medicine.

Some songs are so fine, anyone could redo them and nail it. Checkout "At Last" by B.B. King and Diane Schuur. K.D. Lang could sing the phone book and I'd love it. There are times a remake of a song works better for me than the original, but that needs to be a different post, and maybe a different thread.

Going off track reminds me of "The Wreck Of The Old 97," from the Johnny Cash At San Quentin LP.

Now I have to toss this in, where Johnny has to change harmonicas faster than kiss a duck. Not my line, but Johnny's. Must have been the Folsom Prison LP.

 

I don't think "Stairway to Heaven" was sold as a single so it has no Top 40 charting history, Jimmy.

It's from the Four Symbols album which also caused problems for Billboard since the album really had no name so it could be listed in the album sales section, hence the usage of the Four Symbols moniker.

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2 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

I agree that "borrowing" some old blues licks or parts of songs was likely SOP for some

groups back in the day. I remember coming across a website that detailed exactly which

Zeppelin songs contained these "borrowings" and from which songs and artists they were

taken. It seems Zep did indeed do it more liberally than other groups. I think Chumlee is

correct. I'm sure the meeting was set up and though I won't swear to it as it was some

time ago, to me it seems it was the Blonde on Blonde album that Dylan signed. Pawn Stars

is not as popular as it used to be, but I enjoyed watching it back in its prime. Chumlee got

a lucky break by knowing Corey since I doubt he would have achieved the minor fame he did

on his own. And the drummer died by swallowing vomit, but someone else's vomit. What a great

movie. 

Oh, lordie! The bits from the Tap movie about how they got their name was hilarious. Wasn't there something about they were first called The Originals but then found out another local group was also called The Originals? You could tell they have plundered all the old stories in teen magazines about how the Stones and Beatles and other groups had first been called the Ferrymen or the High Numbers or whatever.


Hilarious!

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15 minutes ago, jimmymac71 said:

I worked in FM radio during 1980, so "Fool In The Rain" was a favorite song. I am not finding Billboard Chart information for "Stairway To Heaven." I might be wrong, but is that the song without a chart history at the time? At 8 minutes long, most radio wouldn't play the whole thing. Back when "Spirit In The Sky" came out, it was considered long at 4 minutes. But that was 1970.

As CaveGirl mentioned, "Stairway to Heaven" was not released as a single. In fact, that was one of Zeppelin's smarter marketing decisions. They rarely released singles, so people ended up buying more full albums.

And "Stairway to Heaven" was frequently played in the whole, since it's one of those "bathroom classics". I'm sure you've heard some variation on the theme since you worked in radio, but many AOR stations played longer songs like "Stairway to Heaven", "Kashmir", "Free Bird", "Hotel California", the live "Do You Feel Like We Do?" and "American Pie", just to name a few, because it gave the DJ enough time to go to the bathroom, eat some food, take a smoke break, whatever else needed doing. Heavy repetition helped make these songs rock radio staples. 

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16 minutes ago, CaveGirl said:

I don't think "Stairway to Heaven" was sold as a single so it has no Top 40 charting history, Jimmy.

It's from the Four Symbols album which also caused problems for Billboard since the album really had no name so it could be listed in the album sales section, hence the usage of the Four Symbols moniker.

Youz good. A promotional single, according to Wikipedia. Back in the days when a promotional 45 was stereo on one side and mono on the other. One for FM, one for AM.

There was never The Honeydrippers Volume 2. A very decent cover of "Sea Of Love."

For me, "Best Of Set," very underground FM DJ talk, would be "Young Boy Blues."

It is possible all 5 songs were remakes. All good.

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