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jakeem

Star of the Month voting for December 2018

56 posts in this topic

1 minute ago, TopBilled said:

I wonder if the Backlot members are pre-code fans. They picked Anita Louise over Anita Page for a Summer Under the Stars day.

How many days did the Backlot members get to populate?

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Just now, calvinnme said:

How many days did the Backlot members get to populate?

They picked two days in August 2017 (Edward G. Robinson and Claire Trevor). And two days in 2018 (Gary Cooper and Anita Louise).

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3 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

They picked two days in August 2017 (Edward G. Robinson and Claire Trevor). And two days in 2018 (Gary Cooper and Anita Louise). 

Anita Louise Day and still no "Nine Girls"! If you have a chance you simply have to watch it! It is an exercise in "necessity is the mother of invention". How do you make an interesting film when every able bodied man between the ages of 20 and 40 is in the military? This film answers that question.

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On 7/8/2018 at 4:12 PM, calvinnme said:

Howard Hughes reportedly bought up all of the copies of The Conqueror and watched it every night in his final years.

I thought Hughes was mesmerized by "Ice Station Zebra."

Image result for ice station zebra

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NONE!  I hate Star of the Month.

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Just now, jakeem said:

I thought Hughes was mesmerized by "Ice Station Zebra."

Image result for ice station zebra

Since he spent all of his time isolated in his bedroom I guess he had time to be mesmerized by several things!

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31 minutes ago, calvinnme said:

Since he spent all of his time isolated in his bedroom I guess he had time to be mesmerized by several things!

I seem to remember that Hughes also loved this 1940s hit song by Lionel Hampton:

 

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30 minutes ago, jakeem said:

I seem to remember that Hughes also loved this 1940s hit song by Lionel Hampton:

 

Interesting that this type of song and style of jazz is being discussed at jazz forums as to why jazz today has the lowest market share of any musical genre and much, much lower than it have ever been.

I.e. is jazz today too much for musicians and that swing and a degree of corny and easy going,  easy to listen to songs, is what is needed to bring people back?  

 

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1 hour ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Interesting that this type of song and style of jazz is being discussed at jazz forums as to why jazz today has the lowest market share of any musical genre and much, much lower than it have ever been.

I.e. is jazz today too much for musicians and that swing and a degree of corny and easy going,  easy to listen to songs, is what is needed to bring people back?  

 

It's probably because there are splintered audiences as a result of the different styles of jazz -- traditional, free, modern, fusion, etc.

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Just now, jakeem said:

It's probably because there are splintered audiences as a result of the different styles of jazz -- traditional, free, modern, fusion, etc.

I don't think so.   It is my understanding that all jazz combined has < 1% market share.    The core audience use to be white college educated males but even the majority in this demographic have moved on to other styles of music.

Jazz is bigger in the EU and Asia than it is in the USA.      I know many jazz musicians that are making a living outside of the USA that couldn't here in the USA.  

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51 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I don't think so.   It is my understanding that all jazz combined has < 1% market share.    The core audience use to be white college educated males but even the majority in this demographic have moved on to other styles of music.

*Jazz is bigger in the EU and Asia than it is in the USA.      I know many jazz musicians that are making a living outside of the USA that couldn't here in the USA.  

Our Kansas Public Radio Station has a history and a tradition of playing music that is marginal in America.

Thanks to a wide donor base, both private and business, they are able able to feature both classical music and jazz Monday through Friday.

They do 40 hours of classical music and 16 hours of jazz with informative and entertaining commentary from live hosts every week.

Backed up by KU's music department, classical music is given more hours and more live performance time than jazz. So even within marginalized music, jazz is marginalized within the station.

 

* I was in Paris when Ella Fitzgerald died and from the press, government and TV reaction, I thought they were about to make it out to be a national holiday. LOL   And the French government gave Miles Davis his Legion of Honor a few months before his death.

 

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40 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

Our Kansas Public Radio Station has a history and a tradition of playing music that is marginal in America.

Thanks to a wide donor base, both private and business, they are able able to feature both classical music and jazz Monday through Friday.

They do 40 hours of classical music and 16 hours of jazz with informative and entertaining commentary from live hosts every week.

Backed up by KU's music department, classical music is given more hours and more live performance time than jazz. So even within marginalized music, jazz is marginalized within the station.

 

* I was in Paris when Ella Fitzgerald died and from the press, government and TV reaction, I thought they were about to make it out to be a national holiday. LOL   And the French government gave Miles Davis his Legion of Honor a few months before his death.

 

Another thing I find sad is the lack of support for Jazz by the African-American community,  especially the younger ones.     As you know most of the jazz innovators (Armstrong,  Dizzy, Parker, Davis,  etc..),  were African-American.    With all the talk about this community getting back in touch with their roots (e.g. African names,  films etc...),   one would hope there would be more energy put into ensuring the legacy of this side of their history;  the greatest American contribution to the arts.   

Yea, there are people like Wilton Marsalis that do a lot to try to keep jazz alive in the community,  but sadly it just isn't sticking.      

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28 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Another thing I find sad is the lack of support for Jazz by the African-American community,  especially the younger ones.     As you know most of the jazz innovators (Armstrong,  Dizzy, Parker, Davis,  etc..),  were African-American.    With all the talk about this community getting back in touch with their roots (e.g. African names,  films etc...),   one would hope there would be more energy put into ensuring the legacy of this side of their history;  the greatest American contribution to the arts.   

Yea, there are people like Wilton Marsalis that do a lot to try to keep jazz alive in the community,  but sadly it just isn't sticking.      

Wynton Marsalis has made a number of classical recordings that the public radio station plays.

The other Jazz notable who had a recorded classic repertoire is Benny Goodman.

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You never know what direction threads are going to take around here! I opened up the thread to say something about voting, started reading the recent posts, and like the last dozen posts are about the fate and future of jazz. I got wrapped up in reading and within 90 seconds, I was asking myself, "Why did I want to post on this thread about jazz again?" and then after a very long pause, something surfaced from the back of my brain and I was like, "Oh, yeah ..."

What I was going to say is Powell is surely going to win. My sense is he's much better-known, even to a presumably reasonably knowledgeable Backlot member.

Let the jazz talk resume! 

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12 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

You never know what direction threads are going to take around here! I opened up the thread to say something about voting, started reading the recent posts, and like the last dozen posts are about the fate and future of jazz. I got wrapped up in reading and within 90 seconds, I was asking myself, "Why did I want to post on this thread about jazz again?" and then after a very long pause, something surfaced from the back of my brain and I was like, "Oh, yeah ..."

What I was going to say is Powell is surely going to win. My sense is he's much better-known, even to a presumably reasonably knowledgeable Backlot member.

Let the jazz talk resume! 

I agree that Powell is much more well known than William but that could be a reason William gets more support.

It is the reason I would select William if I was a Backlot member;  Powell films are played often by TCM.    But if TCM was NOT going to show some of William's Columbia films,  then it wouldn't matter to me either way.   

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18 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

You never know what direction threads are going to take around here! I opened up the thread to say something about voting, started reading the recent posts, and like the last dozen posts are about the fate and future of jazz. I got wrapped up in reading and within 90 seconds, I was asking myself, "Why did I want to post on this thread about jazz again?" and then after a very long pause, something surfaced from the back of my brain and I was like, "Oh, yeah ..."

What I was going to say is Powell is surely going to win. My sense is he's much better-known, even to a presumably reasonably knowledgeable Backlot member.

Let the jazz talk resume! 

I thought it was about jazz too because I didn't look at the title.

But I'm such a big Dick Powell fan that my vote will always be for Richard. I think Dick Powell invented the phrase reinvent yourself.

In the thirties he was the musical singing star.

In the forties he was the tough Noir love them and leave them anti-hero.

In the 1950s he was a TV pioneer who produced, directed, and created classic television and stars.

In between all this he was still directing movies!

You just got to admire this talented man.

They should show not just the films that he starred in but also some of the films that he directed.

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So when does the voting close? Will we find out who's been selected sometime next month?

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I've been a fan of Williams for a long time.  His acting was, shall we say, "of its time," but that doesn't lessen his impact to me.  His turn in The Match King is just wonderful.  He has this forceful, in-your-face style, but always a glint in his eye. Also love him in Skyscraper Souls and Employees' Entrance.  He plays a great scoundrel!  By all accounts he was a very nice guy and died young, possibly due to chemicals he used on his farm, if I recall correctly from his biography...

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On 7/7/2018 at 8:24 PM, Swithin said:

I think I'm rooting for William, but I sure would like to see Dick Powell in Station West again. It was one of the movies that was shown on Million Dollar Movie when I was a kid, and I haven't seen it since.

 

I think TCM has shown it a few times. Wasn't Jane Greer in it?

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3 hours ago, Hibi said:

I think TCM has shown it a few times. Wasn't Jane Greer in it?

Was that Million Dollar Movie in NYC?  It was a long time before I realized (as a kid at the time) that the theme was from GWTW!

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39 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

I have a feeling that Dick Powell might be the one chosen as he is featured more often on TCM, but I could be wrong.....

Screen Shot 2018-07-10 at 1.39.50 PM.jpg

A photo of Dick Powell from 1933.

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21 minutes ago, overeasy said:

Was that Million Dollar Movie in NYC?  It was a long time before I realized (as a kid at the time) that the theme was from GWTW!

Me too!

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On ‎7‎/‎7‎/‎2018 at 6:28 AM, jakeem said:

I'm rooting for Powell (1904-1963), who displayed versatility and growth during his long career. I'll never forget the time I discovered that he was once a movie crooner -- and quite a good one. Of course, this was years before I became an avid viewer of Turner Classic Movies, so I was absolutely unaware of his work in such Depression-era musicals as "42nd Street," "Footlight Parade," "Gold Diggers of 1933" and "Dames." I also hadn't known that he was once married to the veteran actress Joan Blondell, who appeared in some of those musicals. 

The Powell I knew about was a successful dramatic actor, television producer, director and series host. Plus, he was married to the actress June Allyson. He also was one of the luminaries of Four Star Television, the production company responsible for such popular weekly series as "Four Star Playhouse," "Richard Diamond, Private Detective," "The Dick Powell Show," "Wanted: Dead or Alive," "The Rifleman," "Robert Taylor's Detectives," "The Big Valley" and "The Rogues."

Finding out about Powell's early career was akin to discovering for the first time that the great baseball slugger Babe Ruth broke into the majors as a very good pitcher.

I've admired Powell's dramatic fare from the 1940s, particularly his film noir efforts "Murder, My Sweet" (1944, in which he played Raymond Chandler's relentless detective Philip Marlowe) and "Pitfall" (1948). And it's interesting that "The Tall Target" (1951) featured him as an 1860s New York police officer named John Kennedy who stumbles onto a plot to assassinate President-elect Abraham Lincoln.

Whether or not Powell is selected as Star of the Month for December, the odds are we'll see him in "Susan Slept Here," which has become a Christmas holiday favorite on TCM. The 1954 romantic comedy, which also starred Debbie Reynolds, was his final feature film as an actor.

Jakeem buddy only time I though him a pretty effective actor was Playing Marlow though  But highly always liked William Powell-(l892-l984)

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ALERT TO HIS FANS & IN GENERAL HOLLYWOODS GOLDEN AGE & STUDIO-SYSTEM-(l925-63)

 

I've posted this numerous times over several yrs but got no repliues

 

He's always featured in Ken Murray's_(l903-88) HOLLYWOOD, MY HOME TOWN & HOLLYWOOD, WITHOUT MAKE-UP

 

(NOTE: Has anyone seen this, if so send your own comments

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