marimari

social justice???

131 posts in this topic

19 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

It's true. The New York Times has reported the event.

And in reality there was a court case involving it in which the Confidential magazine was sued and they decided to dissolve the publication.

The lady whose apartment was broken into received an out-of-court settlement from Sinatra's lawyer.

 And the whole end result was that Sinatra and DiMaggio were no longer friends.

I've actually seen video on YouTube of Sinatra being questioned about the whole incident in court. That's how I first found out about it  and decided to do some research.

I go after all those historical things on YouTube and then some similar video will pop up and the next thing you know you've been doing it for 2 hours. LOL

There seems to be some disagreement about the details of this stunt. As to

Confidential, it appears they eventually made a deal to stop reporting on the

peccadilloes of movie stars, but as that was what the public bought the mag

for, the new, dull Confidential soon went out of business. Sinatra and DiMaggio

really sound like two dumb bunnies. They should have stuck to baseball and

singing and left the undercover stuff to the professional peepers. 

 

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6 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Andy Griffith was in a number of "dark" Made-for-TV movies in the 1970s, such as The Strangers in 7AGo Ask Alice, Pray for the WildcatsWinter Kill, and Savages, among others.

One 1983 CBS -TV movie called "Murder in Coweta County" was based on a true story. And in this made-for-TV movie, Andy Griffith co-starred with Johnny Cash.

I haven't seen this one, but it looks like a good one.

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To quote Shirley Schmidt (Boston Legal - Candice Bergen), "Oh Please!"

Waitress (2007). Play The Game (2009). Here is the rest of his stuff.

https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0341431/

Do checkout "Waitin' On A Woman," the music video with Brad Paisley.

What It Was Was Football, is some of Andy's cornball comedy.

He did comedy and singing LPs. Fine Gospel stuff.

He sang and played guitar, ukulele, and banjo, on Matlock. He also played the role of his father Charlie Matlock sometimes.

Stereo TV was new when Matlock started, and I think the network was fine with him showing off their new sound.

The 1984 Summer Olympics were in TV stereo, but almost no one had a stereo TV yet.

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21 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

There seems to be some disagreement about the details of this stunt. As to

Confidential, it appears they eventually made a deal to stop reporting on the

peccadilloes of movie stars, but as that was what the public bought the mag

for, the new, dull Confidential soon went out of business. Sinatra and DiMaggio

really sound like two dumb bunnies. They should have stuck to baseball and

singing and left the undercover stuff to the professional peepers. 

 

You talk about embarrassing. You've got to see that video of them questioning Sinatra about it. It's simply hilarious. 

Ironically, the one cover of Confidential that I saw about this story also had Tab Hunter on the cover about an alleged gay party that he had attended in Hollywood.

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4 minutes ago, jimmymac71 said:

To quote Shirley Schmidt (Boston Legal - Candice Bergen), "Oh Please!"

Waitress (2007). Play The Game (2009). Here is the rest of his stuff.

https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0341431/

Do checkout "Waitin' On A Woman," the music video with Brad Paisley.

What It Was Was Football, is some of Andy's cornball comedy.

He did comedy and singing LPs. Fine Gospel stuff.

He sang and played guitar, ukulele, and banjo, on Matlock. He also played the role of his father Charlie Matlock sometimes.

Stereo TV was new when Matlock started, and I think the network was fine with him showing off their new sound.

The 1984 Summer Olympics were in TV stereo, but almost no one had a stereo TV yet.

Jimmy, before Mayberry, I grew up listening to "What It Was Was Football " on the radio.  I also listened to a Southern stand-up comic named Dave Gardner, do you remember him?  I believe he referred to himself as "Brother Dave".

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1 minute ago, Princess of Tap said:

Jimmy, before Mayberry, I grew up listening to "What It Was Was Football " on the radio.  I also listened to a Southern stand-up comic named Dave Gardner, do you remember him?  I believe he referred to himself as "Brother Dave".

Don't know Dave, but do know the late "Mouth Of The Mississippi," Jerry Clower. Here is a quick one:

 

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1 minute ago, jimmymac71 said:

Don't know Dave, but do know the late "Mouth Of The Mississippi," Jerry Clower. Here is a quick one:

 

Nope, but I once saw Minnie Pearl on an Opry tour in Kansas.

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I guess we could explain to marimari, this sort of drifting happens to the best of threads.

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8 minutes ago, jimmymac71 said:

I guess we could explain to marimari, this sort of drifting happens to the best of threads.

Ok, back to the topic;  I know you wish TCM didn't have any hosts,  but what to you think about TCM's topical programmings.    This is often how various groups of people have been portrayed in American films.    The typical set-up is where hosts discuss the topic and then films are shown related to the topic.   

I find these very interesting since I learn a lot about movies and their impact on American society (and vise-versa).  E.g.  the Women in Film series with the focus on Pre-code films like Female with Ruth Chatterson;  Movies with a smart and strong female character (Ruth owns and runs a auto manufacture),   but where she falls in love with a hardheaded man that demands that he run the business and stay home taking care of the kids (which is how the film ends since Ruth concedes to his demands during at the very, very end).    

I don't find the discussion part to be too political,  and rarely do I see them criticize the filmmakers (instead understanding the time period the films were made in and the social norms at that time),   but others have felt this was TCM pushing an agenda (and that I'm nuts not to see that this type of series is mostly political). 

 

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17 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Ok, back to the topic;  I know you wish TCM didn't have any hosts,  but what to you think about TCM's topical programmings.    This is often how various groups of people have been portrayed in American films.    The typical set-up is where hosts discuss the topic and then films are shown related to the topic.   

I find these very interesting since I learn a lot about movies and their impact on American society (and vise-versa).  E.g.  the Women in Film series with the focus on Pre-code films like Female with Ruth Chatterson;  Movies with a smart and strong female character (Ruth owns and runs a auto manufacture),   but where she falls in love with a hardheaded man that demands that he run the business and stay home taking care of the kids (which is how the film ends since Ruth concedes to his demands during at the very, very end).    

I don't find the discussion part to be too political,  and rarely do I see them criticize the filmmakers (instead understanding the time period the films were made in and the social norms at that time),   but others have felt this was TCM pushing an agenda (and that I'm nuts not to see that this type of series is mostly political). 

 

I wouldn't be surprised however to learn that TCM chooses spotlight themes that are relevant to current events.  I don't think they would air these films to push any specific agenda, but rather as a way to draw new viewers. 

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This September TCM is showing AAFCA Presents: The Black Experience in Film, with movies every Tuesday night in prime time. I expect at least one or two disgruntled threads about it. 

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I really shouldn't complain. I am in California, where Ben starts doing intros at 5 PM, during the weekday evenings. I guess he does. I watch the news at 5 PM Pacific. I don't watch Noir Alley. So I am only subject to hosting on Saturday and Sunday. Lately, I am not seeing much depth.

I don't agree with SpeedRacer5, I think it is him, who says, just do something else or mute the sound. That is the easy solution.

For me, it really is the annoying voices. I am really really picky. Very few TV news voices work for me. It isn't a male or female thing.

Maybe the hosts should have a little drinky-drink before they start recording their stuff. Might relax the vocal cords.

I suspect, they record many voice tracks, as they call it in radio today, at one time. Imagine doing a week of voicing in a single session, and like Robert Osborne even, need multiple takes.

Chances are more agree with you than me. Back when I was in automated radio, we played 2-song sets out of the top 40. Mister TM Stereo Rock, with a golden throat, either announced both songs in the middle, or both songs at the end.

Make you and TCM a deal!!! Go into great detail in-between 2 films. Fantastic, if those 2 films have something in common. Then it makes even better sense to announce in the middle. Take 10 minutes. Playing 2 movies in a row with something in common so works for Jimmy. Having an odd, or not easily noticed common thread could make it even more fun. Educating Rita and My Fair Lady are similar.

Okay, gotta go and warm up the old Zenith. The first TV I remember had all tubes inside.

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6 minutes ago, jimmymac71 said:

I don't agree with SpeedRacer5, I think it is him, who says, just do something else or mute the sound. That is the easy solution.

For me, it really is the annoying voices. I am really really picky. Very few TV news voices work for me. It isn't a male or female thing.

I am not a "him."  I am a "her."

Re: the sound of people's voices.  This sounds like a personal issue.  I don't see how my solution doesn't remedy the issue.  Not everyone finds everyone else's voice annoying.

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1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

I wouldn't be surprised however to learn that TCM chooses spotlight themes that are relevant to current events.  I don't think they would air these films to push any specific agenda, but rather as a way to draw new viewers. 

Well what about "AAFCA Presents: The Black Experience in Film";  (BTW,  AAFCA is African-American Film Critic Association)?

Can one really say such programming is not pushing an agenda?    Of course TCM does such programming to 'draw new viewers' but that doesn't mean they are not also trying to push an agenda (e.g. pushing agendas they believe will bring in new viewers from a certain demographic).

Like I said above,  I love such programming and have never felt TCM was over-pushing any agenda or political 'message',   but I think we would be disingenuous to just say there isn't any agenda at all.  

 

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17 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Well what about "AAFCA Presents: The Black Experience in Film";  (BTW,  AAFCA is African-American Film Critic Association)?

Can one really say such programming is not pushing an agenda?    Of course TCM does such programming to 'draw new viewers' but that doesn't mean they are not also trying to push an agenda (e.g. pushing agendas they believe will bring in new viewers from a certain demographic).

Like I said above,  I love such programming and have never felt TCM was over-pushing any agenda or political 'message',   but I think we would be disingenuous to just say there isn't any agenda at all.  

 

Point taken.

I guess when I was thinking of agenda, I was thinking of the typical liberal vs conservative slant.  I do agree that spotlighting specific groups of people, e.g. African-American experience in film as you mentioned above, or the gay/lesbian spotlight that TCM had last year (I think it was last year), I would agree is a way that TCM shines a spotlight on these groups and provides awareness. 

I do like these types of spotlights as TCM often times goes out of their way to select a unique group of films to fill out their schedule.  These monthly features are a way for TCM to showcase other filmmakers that might not be part of the Hollywood echelon. 

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2 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I am not a "him."  I am a "her."

Re: the sound of people's voices.  This sounds like a personal issue.  I don't see how my solution doesn't remedy the issue.  Not everyone finds everyone else's voice annoying.

I do not look at individual profiles. Almost never. So I did not know you were a female. It should not be necessary for me to be sorry, but my internal works say I am. Sorry.

We can agree to disagree, or argue. It is that simple. I am visually impaired. I struggle with the visual side of television. I struggle with the visual side of life. I am very auditory. That is my life. I have no choice. It is not a personal issue, it is a physical issue. If you were forced to be audio driven as I am, your opinion might be different.

I am gently offended when people refuse to understand compromising disabilities. I seldom whine about my multiple disabilities, but you have upset me. Imagine your TV not being in clear focus, until you can touch it. I am very nearsighted, with other visual drawbacks. Please take the time to understand.

I try hard to understand, at the best of my ability, other people's challenges.

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3 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

This September TCM is showing AAFCA Presents: The Black Experience in Film, with movies every Tuesday night in prime time. I expect at least one or two disgruntled threads about it. 

As a fan of music, so much of where we are today, depends on what 'colored' people gave us. I love what people of color, if being PC is a must, have given us. Music and movies. TCM does well with this. Don't figure on me complaining.

Oh Yeah, Jimmy has another Platter That Matters:

 

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If black people stopped using the word "colored" 50 years ago, I hope it won't be too much of an inconvenience to you to let it go, though you make it sound as if it is a great hassle! Yes, I know it's still in the title of the NAACP, but that's just for convenience sake. That organization tends to go strictly by initials these days.

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2 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

If black people stopped using the word "colored" 50 years ago, I hope it won't be too much of an inconvenience to you to let it go, though you make it sound as if it is a great hassle! Yes, I know it's still in the title of the NAACP, but that's just for convenience sake. That organization tends to go strictly by initials these days.

If you are talking to me, I used it as a word based on previous times. Listen to the song. "It ain't the color, its the person." The Donna Fargo LP, "Miss Donna Fargo," dates back to 1974. She was never afraid to sing real songs. I am sure Honeychild could not get radio play. She had radio hits, plus songs for those of us who love her.

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6 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

You talk about embarrassing. You've got to see that video of them questioning Sinatra about it. It's simply hilarious. 

Ironically, the one cover of Confidential that I saw about this story also had Tab Hunter on the cover about an alleged gay party that he had attended in Hollywood.

I'm sure it was, especially as Frankie usually stayed out of those types of situations.

An elderly lady in my neighborhood once gave me a pile of movie magazines from the

early to mid 1960s. Can't remember the title, but it was the usual move star junk.

My dad had some Jerry Clower tapes. You know the old saying You can't unsee something

you've already seen. Thankfully, you can forget things you've heard.

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17 hours ago, jimmymac71 said:

A while back, and I've already posted my thoughts, Alicia spoke after "No Time For Sergeants." She claimed movies at the end of Andy Griffith's career were dark. I was kind of put off by such a statement. I also figured it was her opinion based on everything Andy did before. I am not fond of the characters he played in most all his films.

I do love Matlock, where he played the country boy thing as well. Alicia probably didn't consider that role, as it was TV. Nobody was bothered by my post, as far as I am aware.

Here it is:

http://forums.tcm.com/topic/161264-new-hosts-dave-karger-and-alicia-malone/?do=findComment&comment=1729018  

Y'know, I always figured Griffith did a lot of "unsavory" characters in some films( most "made for TV") towards the end of his career due to his attempt to show the general public that he wasn't  always about being sheriff Andy Taylor.  Many of us have seen NO TIME FOR SERGEANTS  and years of his TV show BEFORE ever seeing A FACE IN THE CROWD and THEN realizing Andy was a bona-fide ACTOR.  But I know several people who STILL haven't seen "Face" or for that matter, anything ELSE Griffith's done besides his Mayberry show and MATLOCK.  So they still think of him as some old goofy country bumpkin type.  Hell, There too, are still many who NEVER heard his hilarious WHAT IT WAS, WAS FOOTBALL.  :D

Sepiatone

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so much of where we are today, depends on what 'colored' people gave us. I love what people of color,

WHAT color you talkin' about?

landscape-1447174925-blue-man-group-2-1.jpg"

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3 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

so much of where we are today, depends on what 'colored' people gave us. I love what people of color,

WHAT color you talkin' about?

landscape-1447174925-blue-man-group-2-1.jpg"

 

Rubber Biscuit.jpg

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13 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

If black people stopped using the word "colored" 50 years ago, I hope it won't be too much of an inconvenience to you to let it go, though you make it sound as if it is a great hassle! Yes, I know it's still in the title of the NAACP, but that's just for convenience sake. That organization tends to go strictly by initials these days.

It is my understanding the use of 'colored' is now the most common and acceptable term;  people of color,  since from a political perspective there is strength in numbers;  E.g. the use of LGBT.

Using 'black' when one is only talking about African Americans is misleading since there are many 'blacks' that are Asia etc...

 

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On 7/8/2018 at 3:00 PM, scsu1975 said:

Here is what Ben said:

“Stories of troops stationed throughout the empire had long been popular and movies like The Lives of a Bengal Lancer routinely delivered, packing in audiences eager for a glimpse of an exotic foreign locale, and generally stories of white soldiers fighting dangerous natives to maintain an empire’s grip on its colonies.”

 

Personally, I'm more offended about the poor sentence structure than the content.

Hey, thanks for giving us the whole sentence, SCSU!

After reading that, I think it is just stating an historical overview of why such movies were being made, and the message they intended to convey, at the time.

So at the time, the "natives" would be seen as "dangerous", just as Native Americans in old westerns were seen as, and the "soldiers" were probably "white". This is just recounting reality of a past time, for some who maybe are not so knowledgeable about how the sun never set on the British Empire in those days.

Speaking of political correctness though, gone amuck...a young guy I know said his wife [who is a control freak] told him that the word "slave" is now verboten and he is never to use it again in speech. Apparently she was making him do a lot of work in the grass behind their house, and he said he was tired of being a "yard slave". He asked me if I thought she was right and I said "No" and I also said "By the way, if I were you I would divorce her now before you have children."

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