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TomJH

Watching 1950's Rocky Mountain, And The Sad Change in A Man

34 posts in this topic

Ha! Thanks for that quote, Tom.
Doesn't EVERY person contemplate where their life is once they realize they are now on the decline? It's called mid-life crisis. At best we can reflect on where our youth & ambition took us, at worst we feel the ship has sailed without us. Everyone realizes how much youth & energy we wasted, and usually most change their goals.

It's just particularly sad when it happens in front of an audience gleefully watching for a "fall". Sometimes we're lucky to be nobody.

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1 hour ago, TikiSoo said:

Ha! Thanks for that quote, Tom.
Doesn't EVERY person contemplate where their life is once they realize they are now on the decline? It's called mid-life crisis. At best we can reflect on where our youth & ambition took us, at worst we feel the ship has sailed without us. Everyone realizes how much youth & energy we wasted, and usually most change their goals.

It's just particularly sad when it happens in front of an audience gleefully watching for a "fall". Sometimes we're lucky to be nobody.

One more thing to be kept in mind, though, Tiki, is that at least twice Flynn had been told by doctors that he wouldn't have much longer to live. He was told so by an Italian doctor in 1953 regarding his liver. (Earlier he had been informed that his lungs were pretty well shot). Flynn wrote about the Italian doctor's report (with dark humour yet!) in his autobiography. He seemed less concerned with the news than with his general indifference to the news. I suspect he was not afraid of death like so many others.

In any event it added, I suspect, to Flynn's decision to dissipate himself even further with a "What the hell. Let's go out with a bang!" attitude.

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I wonder; if Flynn had been around today instead of the mid 1930's - late 1950's, would he have been diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder, and perhaps ADHD. I read his autobiography around 1990, and that was the first impression I got. The "all or nothing" behavior, the inability to concentrate on improving one's life- they all seemed like a red flag to me.

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1 hour ago, sagebrush said:

I wonder; if Flynn had been around today instead of the mid 1930's - late 1950's, would he have been diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder, and perhaps ADHD. I read his autobiography around 1990, and that was the first impression I got. The "all or nothing" behavior, the inability to concentrate on improving one's life- they all seemed like a red flag to me.

That's interesting conjecturing, sagebrush.

I recall one of Flynn's biographers also theorizing about the possibility that Errol had ADHD.

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6 hours ago, TomJH said:

That's interesting conjecturing, sagebrush.

I recall one of Flynn's biographers also theorizing about the possibility that Errol had ADHD.

Robert Matzen mentions possible ADHD in Errol and Olivia.  Flynn had trouble remembering his lines, even in his younger days, and apparently, occasionally ad-libbed, but if the words fit the scene, it was kept.

 

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My book just arrived & I flipped through it. THANK YOU so much for recommending it - if I had seen it on a shelf, I would have never bought it.
Just flipping through it, it's noticeable the genres (pirate, westerns, war) rotated through the years along with a few dramas & comedies sprinkled in. It wasn't like he started in swashbucklers and ended in westerns-his roles were rather varied.

I think Flynn was a great actor and absolutely eye catching no matter his age or role. As Norma Desmond says, "It's the pictures that got small"

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1 hour ago, TikiSoo said:

My book just arrived & I flipped through it. THANK YOU so much for recommending it - if I had seen it on a shelf, I would have never bought it.
Just flipping through it, it's noticeable the genres (pirate, westerns, war) rotated through the years along with a few dramas & comedies sprinkled in. It wasn't like he started in swashbucklers and ended in westerns-his roles were rather varied.

I think Flynn was a great actor and absolutely eye catching no matter his age or role. As Norma Desmond says, "It's the pictures that got small"

Tony Thomas' biographical sections interspersed throughout The Films of Errol Flynn adds to the depth of the portrait of the actor, beyond that of just an appraisal of his films (of which the book does a fine job, as well).

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