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MissGoddess

Hello, Norma Jean!

798 posts in this topic

I think a special dose of Miss G's in-depth analysis is necessary.

 

I get enough analysis as it is, thank you.

 

TD042.jpg?t=1218221334

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*I consider Marilyn's "Roslyn" (a lovely mirror name) to be childlike because her*

*feelings are always so very honest, therefore her words and actions are the*

*same. Her feelings control her thinking. She's heart over mind. She can be*

*easily distracted AND easily mesmerized because of this. Whatever she feels*

*that very instant, she verbalizes, like a child. I find this to be charming... with women.*

*Some will take it as a woman being dumb and airy, and there's truth to that, but*

*I appreciate the honesty of natural feelings. I find it to be refreshing.*

 

Nice capsule analysis of Roslyn, I am all but persuaded. Add the fact that in her case it might be a little darker that you describe. Because she is so confused and directionless following her divorce, at a crossroads, so to speak. So, in her case, not so refreshing (though I think you were speaking generally when you said that.) Also, I don't think you were implying that I thought that she was "dumb and airy" and I'll confirm that. There has to be more to her than that or she is not as interesting (that is, if you ever say that about MM ;) ). I think Arthur Miller probably had exactly what you said in mind when he wrote her.

 

misfits5.jpg

 

So do we have Mr Gable saying that, "We do know, don't we, that the Cowboys are going to win, right? I want you to know that...and frankly, I give a damn!"

 

And I know to what screencap MissG is referring with regard to a certain "attribute" of MissM. Think: ball and paddle scene.

 

Message was edited by: laffite

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Nice capsule analysis of Roslyn, I am all but persuaded.

 

Thanks, Laffite. FYI, I have not forgotten about In a Lonely Place.

 

Add the fact that in her case it might be a little darker that you describe. Because

she is so confused and directionless following her divorce, at a crossroads, so to

speak. So, in her case, not so refreshing (though I think you were speaking generally

when you said that.)

 

A very good point. I think the film is all about being "lost." All of the characters in

the film are "lost," but each in their own way. And even though Roslyn is, as you

say, "confused and directionless," her caring, nurturing heart and soul remains

strong despite of it all. She wishes to take care of all three men and nature. I believe

all three men represent the wants and needs of man from woman. I believe the film

also makes a wise statement on the power of woman to man.

 

Also, I don't think you were implying that I thought that she was "dumb and airy"

and I'll confirm that. There has to be more to her than that or she is not as

interesting (that is, if you ever say that about MM ;) ).

 

You are correct. I was speaking in general terms. I can see where many would view

Roslyn as dumb and airy. Possibly so. But I feel she is smart, just not in the ways

most consider with intellect. She's "humanity" smart, if you will.

 

I think Arthur Miller probably had exactly what you said in mind when he wrote her.

 

I really don't know all that much about Marilyn to say this, but, I got the feeling

that "Roslyn" was basically Marilyn.

 

So do we have Mr Gable saying that, "We do know, don't we, that the Cowboys

are going to win, right? I want you to know that...and frankly, I give a damn!"

 

Excellent! Gable is a cowboy who likes to rope horseys in The Misfits, so

maybe that's a tip-off. But "Gay" lets the horses run free in the end. Well...

 

And I know to what screencap MissG is referring with regard to a certain "attribute"

of MissM. Think: ball and paddle scene.

 

:D Hmmmmm... I'm still drawing a blank. I'm hoping Miss G will provide her lovely

analysis for us. :P

 

misfits5-1.jpg

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Lafitte wrote: Add the fact that in her case it might be a little darker that you describe. Because

she is so confused and directionless following her divorce, at a crossroads, so to

speak.

 

 

FrankGrimes wrote: I think the film is all about being "lost." All of the characters in

the film are "lost," but each in their own way. And even though Roslyn is, as you

say, "confused and directionless," her caring, nurturing heart and soul remains

strong despite of it all. She wishes to take care of all three men and nature. I believe

all three men represent the wants and needs of man from woman. I believe the film

also makes a wise statement on the power of woman to man.

 

I find this scene interesting and it illustrates a lot of what you both said. It's interesting,

too, because Eli Wallach's character, "Gido", who is the most conflicted of the bunch,

is the one who puts into words the essence of each of them:

 

Misfits-GiftofLife01.jpg?t=1218232131

 

(Look how cute Thelma is)

Misfits-GiftofLife02.jpg?t=1218232162

 

Misfits-GiftofLife03.jpg?t=1218232203

 

Misfits-GiftofLife04.jpg?t=1218232234

 

Misfits-GiftofLife05.jpg?t=1218232279

 

Misfits-GiftofLife06.jpg?t=1218232319

 

Misfits-GiftofLife07.jpg?t=1218232356

 

Misfits-GiftofLife08.jpg?t=1218232400

 

Misfits-GiftofLife09.jpg?t=1218232438

 

Misfits-GiftofLife10.jpg?t=1218232475

 

Misfits-GiftofLife11.jpg?t=1218232521

 

Misfits-GiftofLife12.jpg?t=1218232554

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And I know to what screencap MissG is referring with regard to a certain "attribute"

of MissM. Think: ball and paddle scene.

 

Hmmmmm... I'm still drawing a blank. I'm hoping Miss G will provide her lovely

analysis for us.

 

Allow me to fill in the blank. Men are everywhere bowled over by Marilyn's amazing paddle-ball

skills. It arouses the beast in them!

 

Misfits-Bar01.jpg?t=1218233180

 

Misfits-Bar02.jpg?t=1218233447

 

Misfits-Bar03.jpg?t=1218233484

 

Misfits-Bar04.jpg?t=1218233516

 

Misfits-Bar05.jpg?t=1218233547

 

Misfits-Bar07.jpg?t=1218233583

 

Misfits-Bar08.jpg?t=1218233612

 

Is it any clearer now? Or did I miss something? :P

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> {quote:title=ken123 wrote:}{quote}

> Paddle ball is NOW my favorite spectator sport.

 

:D

 

Is it an Olympic event yet?

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Bonjour, Blondle -- I find this scene interesting and it illustrates a lot of what you both said. It's interesting, too, because Eli Wallach's character, "Gido", who is the most conflicted of the bunch, is the one who puts into words the essence of each of them:

 

That is a terrific illustration of what Laffite and I were discussing. Way to go, girl!

 

I think "Gido" is the most frustrated of the lot because he is still holding onto the past and its demons. He's where "Gay" used to be.

 

Allow me to fill in the blank. Men are everywhere bowled over by Marilyn's amazing paddle-ball

skills. It arouses the beast in them!

 

Hmmmmmm, I see yet I don't see. Curious.

 

Is it any clearer now? Or did I miss something? :P

 

No, I think you COVERED IT ALL, Mrs. Selznick. :P

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No, I think you COVERED IT ALL, Mrs. Selznick.

 

Okaay...to what do I owe the honor of being betrothed to David "O"?

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Okaay...to what do I owe the honor of being betrothed to David "O"?

 

Because he was snippy, just like you. :P

 

You like editing films to your liking.

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You like editing films to your liking.

 

David and I both try to maintain high standards, I'm sorry if you thought anything SIGNIFICANT

was missing from my posting. :P

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I'm sorry if you thought anything SIGNIFICANT was missing from my

posting. :P

 

I do seem to remember the film differently than your caps. But, you know me, I have

a horrible memory. I don't remember watching any films, hence I can never talk

about them. :P

 

David and I both try to maintain high standards,

 

So that's what I tripped over today. :P

 

Well, one does need to look out for the kids. You did say Marilyn was great with kids...

 

misfits7.jpg

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I do seem to remember the film differently than your caps.

 

That's odd.

 

But, you know me, I have a horrible memory. I don't remember watching any films, hence I can never talk about them.

 

Sad but true.

 

David and I both try to maintain high standards,

 

So that's what I tripped over today.

 

Ha haaa!!

 

Well, one does need to look out for the kids. You did say Marilyn was great with kids...

 

Now that was NOT her fault for goodness sake! She was busy batting the ball, actually Thelma

was the one who spiked the little tyke's soda. And anyway, in some cultures they give children

a wee bit of whiskey before bed to help them sleep better. :P Works for me!

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Now that was NOT her fault for goodness sake! She was busy batting the ball,

 

Boy, was she ever! She was also busy...

 

actually Thelma was the one who spiked the little tyke's soda. And anyway, in some cultures they give children a wee bit of whiskey before bed to help them sleep better. :P Works for me!

 

In your case, a "wee bit" is a "weeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee bit," Champoo Floozy. :P:P

 

misfits9.jpg

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Boy, was she ever! She was also busy...

 

Yessssssssssssss????????????? Busy doing what????????

 

"There's some keeps getting younger all the time."

 

So that's what that line refers to? The booze? I never quite understoon it. I thought it

was some phrase about people getting old. Or does it mean the drunker you are

the younger everyone else looks? :P

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Yessssssssssssss????????????? Busy doing what????????

 

Dusting the bar. A woman's work is never done. :P

 

"There's some keeps getting younger all the time."

 

So that's what that line refers to? The booze? I never quite understoon it. I thought it

was some phrase about people getting old. Or does it mean the drunker you are

the younger everyone else looks?

 

It's about kids drinking a wee bit of whiskey. It's a favorite bedtime story of champoo floozies. :P

 

Aging.

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Dusting the bar. A woman's work is never done

 

I doubt that bar ever quieted down enough to need dusting.

 

It's about kids drinking a wee bit of whiskey. It's a favorite bedtime story of champoo floozies.

 

Aging.

 

Well that's clear. :0 Splain again, please.

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I doubt that bar ever quieted down enough to need dusting.

 

The dust was being stirred up quite lovely. :)

 

 

It's about kids drinking a wee bit of whiskey. It's a favorite bedtime story of champoo floozies.

 

Aging.

 

Well that's clear. Splain again, please.

 

You are correct, the line refers to aging.

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Dear Miss Goddess

 

Thank you ever so much for posting those screen caps of the ball-paddle game. I wish to compliment you on your discretion. My viewer rating of your screencapping is contingent on the following. If the children in the audience have a vivid imagination I would assign of rating of PG. If the children in the audience have no imagination at all I would assign of rating of G. For the rest of you who feel you might have missed something I recommend you obtain the DVD and see for yourself. No imagination is required for this last group.

 

;)

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Mon cher pirate,

 

I'm delighted that I came up to snuff in the Pirate's Parental Guidance Ratings Criteria. :D

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Sorry to be so long in posting but I got sidetracked.

 

Regarding the Misfits:

 

I really liked the film more than I thought I might. It's really one of those films that deals with life, emotions and such and I always find those movies intriguing. They just tend to put me in a pensive mood, but that's a good thing.

 

*FrankGrimes wrote: From a story point of view, I don't find the film to be depressing. I believe it is human.*

 

I agree, and you know how I love movies that explore humanity. This movie has a lot of feeling to it. Feelings of loss, feelings of sadness, feelings of joy for thinking only of and in the moment, feeling the excitement of something new, but being human we have to question it all as well. All these human feelings can be so overwhelming sometimes that you just might need to step outside look up at the sky and say HELP. :)

 

I thought it was interesting that each of the characters expressed some kind of regret or feeling of loss. Roslyn talked of her parents never being there. **** speaks of his dead wife and the war. Perce recalls his father's death and how it changed his mother. Gay is more guarded, but the scene where he is drunk and calling for his children tells us something about him. And Isabelle? Well, she has been through some things in her life which barely find expression in her cynical humor. She lays it all out for Roslyn telling her about men and life through the prism of her own hard shaped world view....and all with a drink and a weary smile and a comforting realization that it doesn't much matter what we do as long as we're doing something. Just keep living I guess. Having shared her worldly wisdom with us, and with Roslyn, she exits the film.

 

*Laffite wrote: Good caps. I know she is fragile and afraid of everything and all that but this worrying about birds seems kind of silly. Are they overdoing her character too much? I wish Clark would grab her by the shoulders and say, "Get a grip, girl?" 'Course if she gets too much of a grip we don't have a movie, haha. But I think I remember getting annoyed at her for being such a wimp, at least to the extent that she is.*

 

*FrankGrimes wrote: I consider Marilyn's "Roslyn" (a lovely mirror name) to be childlike because* *her feelings are always so very honest, therefore her words and actions are the*

*same. Her feelings control her thinking. She's heart over mind. She can be*

*easily distracted AND easily mesmerized because of this. Whatever she feels*

*that very instant, she verbalizes, like a child. I find this to be charming... with women.*

*Some will take it as a woman being dumb and airy, and there's truth to that, but*

*I appreciate the honesty of natural feelings. I find it to be refreshing.*

 

That's an interesting exchange guys. I kind of felt as if Roslyn was entering into an alien world with these guys. I give her credit for jumping into it. I like the honesty of her feelings too and I think they can be based on her own experiences. Statements like: If I'm going to be alone, I want to be by myself, and when she says to **** about his wife: Maybe thats what killed her. I mean a little complaining helps sometimes maybe, are pretty profound stuff if you think about it. I liked the way Monroe delivers Roslyn's lines in that last quote. She does it haltingly as if she knows that she may be crossing a line but she still says it. Later, when she is talking to Gay, she is more direct:

 

*Gay:* You should've seen his wife. She helped pour cement and knocked in nails. She was a real good sport.

*Roslyn:* Now she's dead because he didn't have a spare tire.

 

I really liked that scene. She's not just going along with everything these men say.

 

*Laffite wrote: Nice capsule analysis of Roslyn, I am all but persuaded. Add the fact that in her case it might be a little darker that you describe. Because she is so confused and directionless following her divorce, at a crossroads, so to speak.*

 

*FrankGrimes wrote: A very good point. I think the film is all about being "lost." All of the* *characters in the film are "lost," but each in their own way. And even though Roslyn is, as you* *say, "confused and directionless," her caring, nurturing heart and soul remains*

*strong despite of it all. She wishes to take care of all three men and nature. I believe*

*all three men represent the wants and needs of man from woman. I believe the film*

*also makes a wise statement on the power of woman to man.*

 

I agree with that. I see the theme of loss as I said earlier. Also a man's need to be his own man. Gay often reminds the others that whatever they have to do to eke out an existence in this world it's better than wages. That's important to him and it always resonates with **** and Perce. It's important to live on your own terms to be independent of bosses and schedules.

 

*Roslyn:* Well what do you do with yourself?

*Gay:* Just live.

*Roslyn:* How do you just live?

*Gay:* Well you start by goin' to sleep.....

 

Roslyn never really questions this basic idea directly. She questions everything that springs from it though. She doesn't understand this peculiar man's world she has stumbled upon. She doesn't know why Perce would put himself at such risk, or why Gay would let him. She views life as a fragile thing. Birds and rabbits are vulnerable creatures. They certainly can't be killed. Why? Roslyn seems driven to preserve the weak. She cringes at the thought of their destruction. Is this a trait driven by her own need for self preservation? Just a thought.

 

*MissGoddess wrote: I find this scene interesting and it illustrates a lot of what you both said. It's* *interesting,too, because Eli Wallach's character, "Gido", who is the most conflicted of the bunch,* *is the one who puts into words the essence of each of them....*

 

*FrankGrimes wrote:I think "Gido" is the most frustrated of the lot because he is still holding onto the past and its demons. He's where "Gay" used to be.*

 

So where is Gay now? Is he frustrated about the old way of life disappearing? His determination about "mustanging" even if it may not be worth it. He seems to be the last person to notice this. His talk of the old days to Roslyn when there were more wild horses and and there was more demand for them than just dog food. I found that all very fascinating. "Gido" seemed ready to break out into an anxiety attack whenever Roslyn was around. I could definitely see his frustration.

 

I really liked Gable's performance. I've always liked him and his easy charm and that gleam in his eye was still there after all these years. His drunk scene and the scenes toward the end were all well played. It was a fitting exit for "The King."

 

Clift's role as Perce was also well done. I think his introduction into the film added a lot to the mix. It gave Roslyn more angles to figure out. Her nurturing quality really came to the front with him. I can't say enough good things about Ritter's Isabelle. It would have been interesting to see her take on the subsequent events after she goes home.

 

Marilyn was fun to watch in more one ways then one. ;) I liked the feeling of being out of one's depth and "lost in life" that she could uniquely bring to that role. She was very touching at times and always beautiful. I like what you all were talking about earlier. How she was involved in the scene even when it didn't directly involve her character. It's little things like that that really added to her performance. I noticed it particularly in the way she played with the dog. Also when we first meet Perce at the phone booth and he's talking to Gay through the window of the car. She is looking at and kind of sizing him up, listening to what they are saying, smiling when the men are joking, being a little uncomfortable about not being totally in on things yet. It's very much like how anyone would be reacting in that situation.

 

Also the scene with "Gido" was really something else. When he offers to help her stop Gay but only if she will agree to be with him for a while. It's a remarkable scene, she lashes out at him with an angry and scathing rebuke that sums him up with such clarity of thought that I was taken off guard. She's not passive in her feelings, she's had enough. I thought that was well played by her. I really liked her in this film. It was a very different kind of role for her.

 

Well thanks to all of you for "twisting my arm." ;) I really enjoyed the film and it offered a lot to think about both during and best of all afterwards. Frank you were right. It's very human and I love films like this. :)

 

I think the ball-paddle game has been covered very well already. I'll leave it alone. ;)

 

2302357701_cdb0f89c33_o.jpg

 

You know, sometimes when a person don't know what to do, the best thing is to just stand still.

 

Standing still in Richmond, VA,

 

-Molo

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Hi Molo

 

Good shot! Now I feel the one who needs to catch up. You evoke the movie well but I don't have a fresh enough recall of it and I feel stymied in forming an adequate reply, at least at the moment.

 

My initial recommendation was based on your reluctance to see Marilyn because of the melancholy aspects, not so much with regard to Rosalyn but in seeing Marilyn herself. There's some baggage there since it her last movie etc etc etc. How did that go for you?

 

*I think the ball-paddle game has been covered very well already. I'll leave it alone. ;)*

 

Well...there may have at least of little suppression there ;) .

 

Seriously (really!), I wasn't all the crazy about the jiggly derriere shot. I don't think it was particularly vulgar, per se., but I thought it was too long and maybe a bit gratitious. If there was something really important about putting that in there, it might have done a little bit smoother and not so obvious way. As a straight, fairly normal red-blooded American male, it has its virtues :) ...but for the movie it might have been tempered a bit (if such things can be tempered ;)

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Molo darling! Your words touched me very much because you see such wonderful things in the movie like I do. All of you who commented on it have. I especially was struck by what you said about how Marilyn conveyed the feeling of not being quite in her element with these guys but being unafraid of jumping in. How beautiful. How wonderful.

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