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daneldorado

Movie Trivia

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Thank You finance. *Meet Me In St. Louis* is the film. You got 1/2 the question. Who was the actress? I'll post the reason the lighting man dropped the spotlight on her, if the site let's me,after your response.

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Correct and Thanks finance. Can't post reason. Tried 4x won't let me - your turn.Now that it posted this I'm going to see if the edit takes. MO's mother wanted her to be paid more. Studio refused. Hired lighting man's daughter, even had her fitted for costumes then changed their minds and rehired Margaret O'Brien. He then dropped spotlight on her and was taken away and committed to a mental institutiuon.

 

Message was edited by: lavenderblue19

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This movie was a major star's last movie........ It had a political theme...... There was a Sinatra song playing on a jukebox in a NY gay bar. The song was never on a Sinatra single or album.

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Thanks again, finance.

 

Name the only screenwriter who has been awarded three UNSHARED Oscars for movie scripts.

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Name the only screenwriter who has been awarded three UNSHARED Oscars for movie scripts.

 

 

 

I think that would be Paddy Chayefsky.

 

He won Oscars for Best Screenplay for "Marty" (1955); "The Hospital" (1971); and "Network" (1976).

 

Cheers,

Dan

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Thanks, cmvgor.

 

Roger Ebert (b. 1942) has been America's foremost film critic since 1967 and still remains a prolific writer although his vocal chords were damaged in a 2006 operation, leaving him unable to speak.

 

Ebert has said -- and written -- that there is only one final line in a film comedy that is equal to "Nobody's Perfect" in "Some Like it Hot." (1959).

 

Name the line, and the movie.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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WAG here, Dan:

*Lover Come Back* : Hospital orderly: "Now that's what I call cutting it close!"

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cmvgor wrote:

 

 

WAG here, Dan:

Lover Come Back : Hospital orderly: "Now that's what I call cutting it close!

 

 

 

Good if true. But that line is NOT the one that Roger Ebert puts on a par with the final line of "Some Like it Hot."

 

There are many, many films with memorable final lines, of course. "Tomorrow is Another Day," "There's No Place Like Home," "Louie, I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship," and many others.

 

But those films are not comedies.

 

Ebert puts one final comedy line on an equal basis -- laugh-wise -- with "Nobody's Perfect." Since he is the dean of American film criticism, his remarks are entitled to respect.

 

Here's a hint: The "final line" is really TWO lines, and they come at the end of a classic film comedy of the 1940s. Either of the two lines will satisfy this question.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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Probably wrong, but is it...

 

Mortimer: "Oh, I'm not a Brewster - I'm the son of a sea cook."

 

Cab driver: "I'm not a cab driver - I'm a teapot!"

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"Because I'm married."

"But so am I, darling. So am I."

 

The Lady Eve

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Thanks for the many replies.

 

Kid Dabb came the closest. The film in question is, in fact, "The Lady Eve" (1941).

 

But the final line -- the one that cracked up Roger Ebert -- is spoken by William Demarest, who plays Fonda's faithful valet.

 

After Barbara Stanwyck tells Henry Fonda that she is married, too... then Demarest, who has been insisting to his boss that she is the same woman he once married, bursts on the scene and says:

 

"Positively the same dame!"

 

KD, the thread is yours.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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dan got it (no surprise there)

 

your turn (just be patient now, there are new folks here)

 

 

 

Thanks a lot, sixes. But right now, I got nothing. So why not let some of those "new folks" come up with a new Movie Trivia question?

 

Thread's open.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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Name a movie in which Peter Sellers played an American (Strangelove doesn't count) and one in which he played a man from India.

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Name a movie in which Peter Sellers played an American (Strangelove doesn't count) and one in which he played a man from India.

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The question as worded was too vague. Name a movie in which Sellers played a suit-and-tie American professional man, and name one in which he played a man from India.

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