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daneldorado

Movie Trivia

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Dan;

 

Will consider it. My usual reason for going the one-chance route is that I don't _have_ any follow-

up questions. But it's worth consideration. In fact, I'll try that with this example.

 

_U.K Setting_. But key roles for American stars. And built around an American involvement. A

seaport city is cultivating American investment for business. An "America Week" is in progress.

American investors are gathering and some shady American types are trying to piggyback on the

money that is going to roll in.

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Dan,I have no problem with cmvgor posting a "quickie". There were at least 5 clues in the question. There are many reasons for anyone to just want to pose a question and not have a lengthy discussion about it. One might be a time constraint.Many of us do have other activities in our lives that take up time so that we can't be here as much as we may want to be. You say that these are helpful suggestions,fine. TCM has provided us with private message. Why not send someone your thoughts instead of posting on the thread? You come across as if you are chastising rather than being helpful and that the end goal is to embarrass.

Since I've been on the other end of your"helpful suggestions" I know that in fact it's not all that helpful.

It was my turn since I answered one of cmvgor's quickie questions correctly.I asked if someone else would fill in to keep the thread going and cmvgor was kind enough to do so.

 

Without belaboring this point, I am requesting that you refrain from criticizing other posters here.This is a place to relax, not one where each one of us has to worry if we are going to be judged.

As I've said before your questions are challenging and enjoyable.However, you are not the hall monitor here.I would appreciate it very much if from here on out you would keep your opinions strictly to what is relevant, our mutual enjoyment of films.

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A British star known to Americans as both a singer and an actor runs a nightclub that will not sell out under pressure to the thuggish "developers". He is always instructing his employees and aides, "Remember to get the receipt." This line comes several times, and it has a payoff at the end.

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Emissaries summoned from London visit the club owner to reason with him. One of them carries the tools of his trade in a briefcase. They are two wooden blocks shaped so that one can rest his elbow on one block and his wrist on the other. The third item is a short steel rod used to break the forearm neatly. The club owner is forewarned. He turns the tables, breaking the visitor's arm

instead. He then hands the keys to their car to the aide who had discovered the purpose of their visit. They are escorted to the station, and they return to London by train.

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lavenderblue wrote:

 

Without belaboring this point, I am requesting that you refrain from criticizing other posters here.This is a place to relax, not one where each one of us has to worry if we are going to be judged.

 

 

 

Sigh. If you would re-read my original post, you would see that I was merely offering a suggestion. It was not a criticism. Matter of fact, I believe I "bent over backward" to avoid offending anyone.

 

You have leaped at my suggestions before. Do you have a short fuse?

 

As for using private messages rather than posting to the board, it's just possible that I felt EVERYONE using this board might benefit from my suggestion. And it IS just that: a suggestion, not a criticism.

 

My take on these Trivia questions is that, at their best, they are like the legendary Dance of the Seven Veils.

 

The original question, while offering some clues as to what is being "concealed," still leaves a lot to be uncovered. A respondent's first question to the poster is like the first veil being removed. It sheds a veil of secrecy. Then, a second clue is given, hopefully eliciting another question -- another veil to be removed. And so on.

 

When someone removes the last veil and comes up with the correct answer, aah! That is sweet! It means somebody "gets it." At their best, all our Trivia questions should be inscrutable at the start, then slowly, gently, sweetly, the veils are removed. It's fun.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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Dan- No one asked for your "suggestions". That's the point. Ask your trivia questions,let us answer them and call it a day.I certainly don't have a short fuse. Months ago you questioned the quality of a question I asked. You felt it was too easy. Someone defended me and felt that you were being less than gracious. I guess your memory is short.There have been other remarks to you, but you are so busy defending the things you write you haven't bothered to understand that they've been directed to you. This is suppose to be fun. Not a contest.Maybe it's time for you to reread the things you post. Being pleasant and nice without the the "helpful" remarks is not a difficult way to behave.Give it a try. You might find a more positive response to many of your "suggestions". I refuse to discuss this with you after this post.

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lavenderblue wrote:

 

I refuse to discuss this with you after this post.

 

 

 

 

 

Well, I am certainly glad of that.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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...onward, ever onward with the multiple clues...

 

A young Irishman, needing a job, carries a "help wanted" sign from the window into the nightclub

and is presented to the club owner. It turns out to be cleaning, but any job will do. Simply by being present when a difficulty comes up, he winds up driving musicians around when their plane arrives early, etc. After work, in a restaurant, he overhears the London visiters' plans to harm his boss. Thus it is he who warns the boss in plenty of time to turn the tables. It is he who winds up in possession of the thugs' car.

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It sure sounds like "Stormy Monday" (1988).

 

Sting is the owner of the jazz bar/night club, and Sean Bean is his Irish employee.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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...And Tommy Lee Jones as the American gangster, with Melanie Griffith as the moll who turned on him after she met Bean.

 

Got it. Go.

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Merry Christmas to: pastman, molo14, cmvgor, MilesArcher, JackFavell, lavenderblue19, metz44, rohanaka, Jenetico, rainingviolets101, ILoveRayMilland, visualfeast, Film_Fatale, and all the other "Triviots" who regularly visit these boards.

 

Happy Holidays to all!

 

Cheers,

Dan

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In what film was the leading man an actor who was actually the producer's FOURTH choice for the role... and he won an Academy Award for his portrayal!

 

There are rumors that the actor in question was actually the SIXTH choice, not the fourth, and those rumors will continue forever. All I'm asking is that you name the Oscar-winner who was not even in the top three chosen by the producer.

 

Name the actor and the film.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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This question was posted on December 27, but has received no replies.

 

The board is open to anyone who wants it.

 

 

 

*In what film was the leading man an actor who was actually the producer's FOURTH choice for the role... and he won an Academy Award for his portrayal!*

 

*There are rumors that the actor in question was actually the SIXTH choice, not the fourth, and those rumors will continue forever. All I'm asking is that you name the Oscar-winner who was not even in the top three chosen by the producer.*

 

*Name the actor and the film.*

 

Cheers,

Dan

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Just a guess. Was it Gary Cooper in "High Noon"?

 

 

 

No, it wasn't. I'll save this question for another time. Go ahead and submit one of your own.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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No takers for 3 days; I'll try one.

 

The actors are brothers, and the characters are brothers. Both characters are musicians -- pianists. Things come to a head, and they have a hillarious fight in an alley. Both try to fight without hurting their hands. This means a lot of grab-by-the-lapels-and-throw-over-the-trashcans action. In fact, the winner is the one who gets hold of his brother's hand and bends the pinky backwards. It's an instant submission hold.

 

_Who? What film?_

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ok. thank you.

 

This actor was offered the role of James Bond and declined. He declined the role once again twelve years later not being happy with plot direction. He accepted the role some twenty years after the first offer.

 

Who is the actor?

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This actor was offered the role of James Bond and declined. He declined the role once again twelve years later not being happy with plot direction. He accepted the role some twenty years after the first offer.

 

Who is the actor?

 

 

 

Patrick McGoohan is the only actor I can find, who was offered the role of James Bond and rejected it -- TWICE. But I cannot seem to find a record of his accepting the role twenty years later.

 

So the answer may not be Patrick McG., but I had to get that out of the way.

 

Is it Patrick McGoohan?

 

Cheers,

Dan

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Thanks for the reply Dan. The actor is not Patrick McGoohan.

 

The actor played the role again two years later. He was contracted for three Bond movies.The pre-production of his third film began but was cancelled due to legal issues between UA/MGM and EON, which lasted for four years.

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The actor played the role again two years later. He was contracted for three Bond movies.The pre-production of his third film began but was cancelled due to legal issues between UA/MGM and EON, which lasted for four years.

 

 

 

Oh, in that case the answer is: Timothy Dalton.

 

According to Dalton's bio: He was approached and tested for the role of James Bond in On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) but turned it down, feeling he was too young for the part.

 

Around 1984, Roger Moore was considering leaving Bond, and Dalton was again approached, but due to his full schedule, he had to decline.

 

Dalton finally did appear as Bond in "The Living Daylights" (1987) and again in "Licence to Kill" (1989).

 

Cheers,

Dan

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In what film is the following a key line?

 

"He said he didn't have all day and he worked nights."

 

Hint: I cannot locate it on the IMDb quotes or on Google, so this might be a good question. Name the film, the speaker of the quote, and what it means.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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