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daneldorado

Movie Trivia

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Hi again. I'm bumping this question, 'cause it's a good one. Too good to let it die on the vine.

 

 

 

 

 

In what film is the following a key line?

 

"He said he didn't have all day and he worked nights."

 

Hint: I cannot locate it on the IMDb quotes or on Google, so this might be a pretty good question. Name the film, the speaker of the quote, and what it means.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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Hi... I'm bumping this question again, this time with a new clue.

 

The clue: This line is spoken by an Oscar-winning actress. She did win the Academy Award, but not for this film.

 

 

 

In what film is the following a key line?

 

"He said he didn't have all day and he worked nights."

 

Hint: I cannot locate it on the IMDb quotes or on Google, so this might be a pretty good question. Name the film, the speaker of the quote, and what it means.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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dan, any more clues, answer, or is thread open?

 

 

 

Sixes, I thank you for your response. True, you didn't submit a guess as to the answer; but at least you responded to my question. It's been up for ten (10) days, and I was seriously thinking of pulling the plug.

 

More clues? Sure.

 

This line is spoken by an Oscar-winning actress. She did win the Academy Award, but not for this film. Here, she is speaking to an actress who plays her daughter.

 

Here is the line again:

 

 

"He said he didn't have all day and he worked nights."

 

Who said that line, and to whom?

 

Cheers,

Dan

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Okay, I'm pulling the plug.

 

No one was interested in replying to my question about the guy who worked nights, so I hereby declare the question CLOSED.

 

But this thread is open to whoever wants it.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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mr6666 wrote:

 

dan, might we have the answer, out of consideration to those who gave question a go, but were unsuccessful?

thanks...

 

 

 

 

Your motion is denied. Of COURSE I would give the answer, as I always do when people have made several tries to answer. But in this case, there were NO replies! Check it out. Why should I show "consideration" to all those folks who simply IGNORED the question?

 

Sorry if that sounds arrogant. You know me, and you know I can be most gracious when earnest replies to my questions are posted here, right or wrong. But not when my questions go ignored.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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daneldorado, I wasn't around when you asked the question. May I offer a response? I must admit it is the wildest of wild guesses, but at least I'll know I tried.

 

Is it Lana Turner, to her husband, in "The Postman Always Rings Twice"?

 

Message was edited by: route66

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Addressing Dan;

 

I'm in agreement with Sixes. Advise pay attention to the point about counting Views.

 

Cheers,

 

cmvgor

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To sixes and cmvgor:

 

Sorry to sound like such an idiot, but apparently you guys have some program on your computer that I don't have on mine.

 

HOW do you count "views" on these message boards? I've looked all over this site, and haven't found a way to do that.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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Dan,When you click on the forum of choice, like Trivia, you get a screen listing all the threads under that heading. There are five column headings: Thread, Author, Views, Replies, and Last Post. If you make a note of how many views the thread has had before you post your reply, and then check again later, you can tell how many people saw your reply even if nobody responded. As I'm writing this, there have been 2,675 views and 198 replies to this thread. I look at lots of threads, but I don't usually reply unless I think I have the answer. I don't remember a lot of lines of dialogue from movies, so I rarely respond to questions about them. Don't give up. Just think about giving a little help so that some of us may have a clue as to where to start looking for an answer. We all like to answer trivia questions about movies, or we wouldn't be on these boards, but sometimes we just don't have an answer. If you don't get an answer after a reasonable period of time, simply tell everyone what the answer was and move on to another question. Thanks.

 

Message was edited by: MilesArcher

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Addressing Cheerful Dan re MilesArcher's comments re View-counting (currently at 2,711 Views):

Yeah, uh, what he said.

 

cmvgor

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I was correct. You guys obviously have superior hardware to mine.

 

When I click the Forum of choice -- in this case, Trivia -- I do NOT get a screen listing all the threads under that heading. I've tried every way I can, to make it come up, but it simply will not.

 

So, until I get an update on my computer, I will have to plod away as I have before. If no one responds to a question of mine, I must perforce deem it a lack of interest.

 

Sorry if I offended anyone, but that is what my hardware -- such as it is -- compels me to do.

 

In the future, however, if you consider answering one of my questions but don't come up with the answer, submit ANY name you can think of. I react to wrong guesses the same as I do to correct ones. At least it shows me that SOMEONE is reading.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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*At 7,238 Views:*

Curious, Dan. I would have thought that the format belonged to Turner, and that all screens would show the same. What _do_ you see when you click on to a Forum?

 

Anyway a question that involves two movie titles. This line is in two different movies, in very nearly the same exact wording. The line:

 

"_Never was a horse that couldn't be rode; never was a man that couldn't be throwed."_

 

Obviously, stories with Western emphasis. One story is set in the 19th Century, the other is set in the 20th Century. What can you tell about film titles, setting for the comments actors, etc.

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Negative re *Lusty Men*, but you're on the right track. One of the sites I have in mind is indeed

a rodeo-based story.

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"_Never was a horse that couldn't be rode, never was a man that couldn't be throwed_

 

I don't want to lean too hard on this one. That bit of doggerel is pretty generic; it could turn up

in any story involving equestrians and spirited horses. I don't know if its been used in Black

Beauty, *Flika* or *Racing Stripes*, but I'm not sure it hasn't, either. The movies I that I am sure have used it are:

 

In John Huston's *The Unforgiven* (1960) ace bronkbuster John Saxon uses that line to comfort Albert Salmi, who has just been throwed. They are in the course of taming some new mounts needed for a cattle drive.

 

In Sam Peckinpah's *Junior Bonner* (1972) Steve McQueen and his friends and family are sitting

auound talking Rodeo, which has taken up a lot of their time and their lives. The line goes down comfortably, something that they have had to contemplate many times.

 

Thread's open if anyone has a new question.

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I stumbled onto this fact. Hope it isn't too difficult... it's 60's color.

 

This film is unique in being the only film to win the Best Film award without containing a single female speaking role.

 

Name that film

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*Bingo!* Thank you, Dan. You have the correct answer. I was going to mention a female camel but thought that would be a dead giveaway. Please, have a go.

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I'll jump in with the obvious (though probably mis-guided) answer: Ron Howard.

 

 

Hiya unclecharlie... It isn't Ron Howard, though I am glad you got that answer out of the way first. He is the first one you would think of.

 

Although Ron Howard directed three short films at age 15, none of them were made for TV. Also, Ron Howard -- despite his great fame, and his other awards -- has never won a Golden Globe, as I said the person in question has.

 

For those of you who tuned in late, let me repeat the question:

 

 

 

Name the Golden Globe winner who, at age 18, became TV's youngest-ever director.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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Jason Bateman

 

Received the Golden Globe for his role of Michael Bluth on Arrested Development.

 

Directed several episodes of Valerie when he was 18, making him the youngest TV director ever.

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Jason Bateman

Received the Golden Globe for his role of Michael Bluth on Arrested Development.

Directed several episodes of Valerie when he was 18, making him the youngest TV director ever.

 

 

You've got it, pastman. The board is yours.

 

Cheers,

Dan

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Thank you, Dan.

 

This film had no opening or closing credits in its original version. The film opens with curtains parting to reveal the orchestra entering and taking their places. During the film's intermission, a solitary title card was to be played over the movie theater's closed curtain, reading:

 

(movie title)

Copyright (date) (so-and-so Productions Inc.). In Technicolor. Approved MPPDA Certificate No.(xxxx). RCA Sound System.

 

On the DVD, the RKO logo is also seen on the intermission card.

 

For the film's rerelease, and for all later theatrical releases, the title card seen during the intermission was transferred to the very beginning of the film (in regular main title fashion), but no other credits appeared. This was the way the film was shown until 1990, when closing credits, listing the entire technical staff and those involved with the 1990 restoration, were added to the end of the film.

 

Please name this film

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