rohanaka

Western Movie Rambles

8,364 posts in this topic

That gives me an idea! Oh, Peacemaker

 

I'm on it!! Great idea!!! :P (meanwhile.. we are going to have to rent a bigger storage shed to house my arsenel soon.. ha. I am running out of room!!) :D

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Oh noooooooooooooo! Heathcliff is coming over! I have to spray dust and cobwebs everywhere so he'll feel right at home. :D Ha! Thank you Miss Peacemaker. You make this place worthwhile...and safe for us civilians!

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I have to spray dust and cobwebs everywhere so he'll feel right at home.

 

Ha.. just tell him you will meet him at my house... ha. (the way things have been around here lately.. that is sad but true) :D

 

You make this place worthwhile...

 

Well, now you are being way so very far nicer than I deserve.. but thanks.. (and ps: right back at ya, little gal) :-)

 

and safe for us civilians

 

Ha.. yes.. me and Barney Fife. (nip it!!) :D

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Hi Miss G. Congratulations on your reaching 23k's. It's not just the number of your posts, but the heartfelt emotions you put in your rambles expresses your love of classic films. I've really enjoyed them. I love their genuineness.

 

:D Congratulations! :D

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May I also add my "Congratulations" and I ,like the rest, are looking forward to the next 23K. It's great to read someone who brings intelligent insight into films we all care so much about....Keep up the good work......

 

Edited by: fredbaetz on Sep 9, 2010 12:39 PM

 

Edited by: fredbaetz on Sep 9, 2010 12:45 PM

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I found this DVD cover art for the German DVD of *The Tall T* and thought

it was surprising who dominates the image:

 

tallTDVDcover.jpg

 

Ha!

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found this DVD cover art for the German DVD of The Tall T and thought

it was surprising who dominates the image

 

Oh my golly... way different from the other... Boone looks downright menacing...

 

PS: Went to the library.. my copy for this movie is here!! Yeehaw!!! I am looking forward to it after reading all these posts (I know.. ha.. shame on me for giving in to the temptation and reading all the spoilers.. ha) Will try to watch tonight. or tomorrow if possible... then maybe I can catch up. (WH still not in yet.. but at least I have seen that one before... )

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Jackie, the picture almost looks more like it's taken from "HGWT" than The Tall T!

 

Ro---Yay! I look forward to your views as soon as ever you get a chance to watch it.

It sure is good to have you back rambling again! :D

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Miss G says: It sure is good to have you back rambling again

 

(Ha. You better wait until you read THIS long and blabby ramble little missy!! Ha. I am sorry in advance for such a lengthy post, but I have a bit of catching up to do!)

 

Wow.

 

I just watched the Tall T and I L-O-V-E loved it! But now for SOME unexplained reason I have a hankering for some striped cherry stick candy!!! (ha)

 

OH good grief and GOOD gravy, HA! Didn't?t he have a SADDLE BAG to put that stuff in for crying out loud!!

 

WHERE was the prop guy? (was there some sort of prop guy strike going on the day they filmed all those scenes?)

 

?Hey Budd, what should I do w/ this candy??

 

?Aw heck, Randolph, we lost our prop guy, guess you will just have to hang onto it? HA! :D

 

So here is Randolph Scott riding around out in the desert with all that dirt and dust flying around and that candy was in his hand the WHOLE trip?? And then when he gets to that ranch where he rides the bull, he gets knocked down in the dirt by that run away horse and the candy falls down with him and then that rancher picks it up and sits on the fence watching Scott ride that bull (and the WHOLE time he is sitting there he is holding that package of candy!!!) And THEN after Scott loses his horse and he is walking along that dirty road he has the candy sticking out of the pocket of his sweaty shirt.

 

Ok. So there you have it. This is just about my ONE and only major complaint for this whole film. I TRULY liked this movie a LOT but I just could not get over this whole ?candy? thing. Ha (the mom in me is just GAGGING from the thought of how DISGUSTING that stuff would have been by the time all that went on, ha) I KNOW we were supposed to get the idea that he LOVED the little boy and was bringing him that candy no matter what, but good gravy, I got tired of seeing it handled like that.

Ha. Those sticks had to be SO covered in dust and dirt (and who knows WHAT was on the ground at the cattle ranch earlier, ha) by the time it arrived at it?s destination if that poor little kid had not been a goner already he?d likely have died from stick candy poisoning!! (ha)

 

Golly I hate to see good candy go to waste! Ha. (at least Billy Jack got to have SOME of it before Frank knocked that one stick out of his mouth. HA. (and just in the knick of time, too or HE might have croaked from ingesting all the dirt and germs and then that would have evened the odds considerably sooner and the movie would JUST not have been as exciting! ha)

 

But I digress. :D

 

OK, NOW onto the REAL ramble.

 

*Tall T Spoilage Ensues*

 

WOW, have you folks covered a LOT of territory. I am going to be hard pressed to catch up so I will try to cover as much as I can.

 

First I want to say again how much I enjoyed your opening thoughts, Ms Favell. You have really set the tone with laying out the characters as ?Good, Bad, Ugly, and REALLY Ugly?. And you were SPOT on w/ the comparison to Fargo too. My goodness what a weasel that Mims guy was. In some ways, to ME he seemed to be THE worst offender of them all. (except for maybe ****. That guy was pathological for sure) But wow what a piece of work to stoop so low as to bargain for his own life at the expense of his wife and everyone else if you think of it.

He met the end I only WISH Macy?s character could have gotten in Fargo (except maybe I think it was pretty sweet seeing him get hauled out of that hotel room in his underwear, just crying like a baby, so I don?t know)

 

Brennan is the only man in the movie who has a sense of morals, and the nerve to back it up. He sees things straight, even when life is unpleasant. There is only one way to live, and that is truthfully, honestly, whether you are on the right side or the wrong side of the law. And it makes no difference if what you see is good or bad, but you must actually see it, and see it for what it is, in order to act. You have to put your money where your mouth is

 

He was as good a white hat as I love to see in a movie like this. I really enjoyed his resolve. His first motivation (when they are captured) was for himself (he says he doesn't?t want to die even if she does) but then over time he takes ownership of her situation too. But really, I suspect, he?d have done that whether the two of them had formed a bond toward one another or not. He was the direct opposite of Mims in that he was NOT a ?save my own skin first? sort of guy.

 

Do you think Frank (Usher) would have had the memory of the boy's death in his head for all of eternity, or do you think he would have walked away without a thought - if Brennan had not come along to act as a sort of ideal of what he might have been

 

What I am asking is if you think that Frank had a real conscience, not just regrets? I still am not sure

 

Jackie, I like you in that I WANTED to feel sorry for Frank. But he was just to horrid (down inside) for me to give him that sympathy I WISHED I could have given him. If he had been the ?underling? working for one of the other men, I might have. But he was clearly ?the boss? at least it seemed that way to me. So that tells me he either A) TOLD **** to kill the dad and little boy at the station. Or B) could not stop him from doing it (and then did not hold him accountable by shooting **** in turn)

 

So to me this says a LOT about his character.

 

I think he is a PERFECT example of someone who may have had some spark of a conscience but just has gotten WAY too good at ignoring it. He was as ruthless as they come in that he ONLY had his own best interest at heart in the end. He MIGHT have had a moment here and there (where possibly he caught himself reflecting on what MIGHT have been if he had chosen a different path. And that scene w/ the food for Mrs. Mims might be an example).) And maybe he DID see something in Brennan?s inner character that he WISHED he could have had himself, but I think in his mind he realized he?d gone too far and it was too late. Because really for the rest of the entire movie, it just was all about him and at the end of the day, I think he had no measurable conscience really. (but was just not ruthless enough to get his own hands dirty so he lets his men handle the dirty work) So no. I don?t think he felt any lasting guilt for the boy. Maybe if he had lived and grown old, I?d like to think SOMEWHERE in the dead of night a cold chill would have gotten to him and he?d have the fear of his guilty conscience to keep him up at night, but it would not have been a ?repentant? life changing sort of guilt. That was just my impression.

 

Miss G says:

He's a cautious man of the west...he can wait for the right time and opportunity. Look how carefully he plans every move, so calculating, it's brilliant. He's really every bit as smart as Frank but infinitely wiser

 

That is a good way to compare and contrast the two men. Brennan planned his moves before he carried them out. Frank was a ?think on your feet? guy. Only evidently he did not really THINK on his feet well enough to succeed. He NEVER intended for their stagecoach robbery to turn into a kidnapping so he made a plan (for the ransom) that made it necessary to split him and his men up to carry it out. And that is what cost him everything. He did not have the wisdom of seeing the ? danger signs down the road? the way Brennan did.

 

He and Brennan both had the ?idea? of owning their own place someday. Brennan knew how to work and plan and carry it out. Frank was looking for an ?opportunity? to drop in his lap.

 

Mr Movieman says:

Why did Boone come back? Scott gives him the chance to just go away but he can't. Maybe he won't admit to being beaten. He is no worse off if he goes. He is short two people who he didn't really feel any real relationship with. Where is the strength? Is it coming back to confront Scott or would it have been to just ride off?

 

Movieman, I am w/ Ms Favell. I think it was ALL about the money. (but it MIGHT have also been about not wanting to be beat?) I truly do think the 50 grand was just too much to walk away from without a fight.

 

I have to say Boone really was VERY smooth. I think of all the actors in that film, he comes off as the most ?natural? Someone mentioned how ?stoic? Scott is in this movie, and to me that is a good way to describe him. I have always seen a level of this in his acting that has kept him not as high up on my list as I might have placed him otherwise. Not saying I don?t LIKE him as an actor, I just think he sometimes come off a bit ?stone faced? no matter WHAT he supposed to be registering. But BOONE on the other hand just flows naturally like water. He is NOT anything other than who he is playing on screen at the moment and he is PERFECTLY conversational in the way he delivers his lines. (as if you could just jump right in the chat with him) He gives the right emotion every time. I LOVE his ?smart mouth? replies. (and his nasty comebacks that almost sound like a joke (but you know he is not joking at all) I still think Big Jake is my favorite for him but WOW this film has got to be a close second. (and PS: SOMEDAY I am going to check out his TV series that you all have brought up recently as I have never seen it but BOY would I like to now)

 

Ms Favell says: She sees what she wants to in her husband, because otherwise, life would be unbearable. And yet, when the truth is finally laid out for her, it isn't as bad as she thought, because she already knows the truth, deep down. She is NOT the "old maid" that she thought she saw in the mirror, and she has stronger resources than even she imagined

 

I really like the transition for her character. She starts out very ?plain? and non-descriptive, but in the end she is much like Brennan. She has let her hair down literally and figuratively and by the time it is all over, she has even taken on a similar ?color? and appearance as he has, fitting into the deceptively plain, yet ?wild and free? landscape.

 

The Grey Guy says: I also view the film as strength vs. weakness and how the two can be sometimes confused for the other. Brennan (Randolph Scott) is clearly the strongest character in the film, yet, he admits to be scared and he makes a fool of himself a few times, including bumping his head and Then you got Frank (Richard Boone), **** (Henry Silva), and Billy Jack (Skip Homeier). They've got all the power on their side because they got an arsenal and are crazy enough to use it without remorse. Does this make them strong? Well, all of their weaknesses are used to undo them.

 

That is a terrific way to compare and contrast them all. And I would add Mims in the list of people who were ?undone? by their own weakness too.

 

And PS: Mr Movieman. Again I say SEE what you started!! Gee, I am really glad you brought this film up for a ramble. I might never have sought it out on my own (because again, I am a bit guilty of not being TOO big on Randolph Scott (in general) but I also have not really just sat down a made a study of his films the way I likely should have. This one was terrific, and I am truly glad to have gotten in on this here chat .

 

Thanks again for letting me blab!

 

Edited by: rohanaka on Sep 10, 2010 3:59 AM

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Ro,

 

I love what you wrote here about Doretta:

 

She starts out very ?plain? and non-descriptive, but in the end she is much like Brennan. She has let her hair down literally and figuratively and by the time it is all over, she has even taken on a similar ?color? and appearance as he has, fitting into the deceptively plain, yet ?wild and free? landscape.

 

I didn't even pay attention to any change in her appearance, except that she got more disheveled, but I remember all that you say now. She ironically got more attractive as she "came undone", too.

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I am so glad you enjoyed it. For its day this (and the other Scott/Boetticher films) was considered more of a "B" picture. To me, it's curious, whether anybody watched them that critically. These were not big budget films. I am pretty sure they were second feature films. Scott hadn't made a major film in a while. O'Sullivan had not done much past supporting roles and few of those and Boone seems little more than a tv actor at this point. Who knew we had such a gem?

 

You might also try "Ride Lonesome." I also like "Buchanan Rides Alone" but it is not as deep a film as "The Tall T" and even "7 Men From Now."

 

Scott and McCrea made only westerns after about 1947 or so. If you love westerns you'd be doing yourself a favor to check some of them out.

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Speaking of McCrea, did anyone catch THE GREAT MAN'S LADY? I was smitten by it.

It's not a "great" film, but I found myself crying several times throughout the story so Wellman

must have worked his magic once again. I'm finding more and more what a softy he really was

about women and romance. I believe moirafinnie observed it may have been he was inspired

by the happiness he found with his third and last wife. He was always talking about her in

interviews. I think he appreciated what a woman could do for a man, how she could inspire him.

 

McRea is good, if a bit one-note, but it's really Stanwyck's story and film and Brian Donlevey was wonderful.

 

OK commerical over, back to *The Tall T*.

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First of all, Brian Donlevy is definitely growing on me as an actor - especially in the roles where he shows a soft side - he can be so wonderful, and I never knew it. I missed the *Great Man's Lady*, but I won't if it's ever on again, thanks to your reviews here and over at SSO.

 

Secondly, Ro I am SO glad you are ramblin' again! Have you seen *Ride the High Country?* Because McCrea and Scott are sooo..... GREAT in it. Yes, GREAT is the only word.

 

Richard Boone is just fantastic - and you have hit on his strength - he IS very conversational... I LOVE the way he tosses off his lines as if you were right there in the room with him. He doesn't seem to be acting at all.

 

If you EVER get the chance, I recommend HGWT - I don't think you will be disappointed. There are some episodes on you tube.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2yCOp8j5pno&feature=related

 

I totally understand what you are saying about Randolph Scott - for years I thought he was just a terrible actor, with cold slitty eyes and a really twangy Virginia accent. I could not see what the fuss was about.

 

The movie that totally changed my mind was *Seven Men from Now* - and to some extent, *Decision at Sundown* (by all accounts the worst of the Boetticher/Scott westerns). I realized that Scott is very emotional - but it is all under the still surface of the water, if you know what I mean.

 

In The Tall T, I went back and watched a lot of the scenes over again on the computer, where I can see the picture larger - in order to take screencaps. I think Scott was born for the big screen. Check out the scene with the axe, where he is watching **** watch him chop wood! He is SEETHING with anger, but not stupid enough to let it get the best of him. I like the way he bites off his words when he 's making a point, letting Frank know he is displeased without making too much of an issue of it. When he says he is scared, his words come out angry- because he has just found out that the boy is in the well. There is so much actually showing on his face, but you sometimes don't notice it because he is so tall and craggy - his eyes are hooded with wrinkles and it makes him somewhat noble looking. He's like an aged and wizened lord or something, honestly, he should have been in an Akira Kurosawa movie.

 

I have started to see an amazing range of expression on his craggy face - the first time was watching that scene in Seven Men from Now where he is sleeping under the wagon from Gail Russell.... he's remarkably soft in that scene. Take a closer look if you ever get the chance and you will start to see more happening in his eyes and with his body language than is immediately apparent under that placid wind-blown and yes, stoic face.

 

Brennan discovers the fate of Hank and his boy:

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

 

Brennan visibly upset while chopping wood with the axe:

Photobucket

 

Brennan chuckling over something Frank has said:

Photobucket

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Here he decides to kill Richard Boone with the meat knife - but he changes his mind. The odds are against him:

Photobucket

Photobucket

 

Here's that soft look again:

Photobucket

 

And again. She just told him she will stay with him no matter what.

Photobucket

 

He looks like he could cry for the waste he's just made of Richard Boone:

 

Photobucket

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Sep 10, 2010 12:21 PM

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My goodness Jackie those are the BEST examples you could possibly have thought

of to illustrate Scott's remarkable face. And it IS a remarkable, made-for-the-big-screen

face. Fabulous! Such a WESTERN face, like it was carved out of the mesas...and yes,

you are right, it is an inherently noble face.

 

P.S. I hope you can catch The Great Man's Lady one day, if only for Donlevey. He

plays a quasi-Tom Doniphon character with such poignancy.

 

Edited by: MissGoddess on Sep 10, 2010 12:31 PM

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Scott is just like the red rocks of the west --- but there is definitely a lot going on in that mind. He is ALWAYS thinking in this movie, he never stops, except for in that one scene with Maureen.

 

I am going to check and see if I can find a copy of The Great Man's Lady - if I can tear myself away from Paladin for a second - I got hooked again!

 

I like Donlevy best in Impact, and in the one with Veronica Lake and Alan Ladd - where he plays the good/bad friend? I can't remember which one it is.

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Sep 10, 2010 12:42 PM

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*The Glass Key* is the one with Ladd/Lake you may be thinking of. In TGML, he's rather similar to the character in IMPACT, only even

more deep I think.

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That's right! The Glass Key.

 

>In TGML, he's rather similar to the character in IMPACT, only even

more deep I think.

 

Swell! I love Wellman, too. I think I need Ollie.... I can't find it anywhere.

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In my opinion the worst of the Scott/Boetticher westerns is "Westbound." Worst may be too strong a word as weakest may fit better. To me it is more like some of the early 50s westerns. A generic story with not as much depth as the others. It is a WB release (different than the others) and that is why it is not included in the regular box set. But in that regular set you are correct.

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I like Decision at Sundown because it was my first Boetticher, and I totally did not expect the way it turned out... without giving anything away, the twist at the end blew my mind. And the way Randolph Scott throws a glass.

 

Edited by: JackFavell on Sep 10, 2010 1:18 PM

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She ironically got more attractive as she "came undone", too

 

She did, didn't she. I think her voice even became stronger.. and yet softer (in some respects) though that likely does not make any sense. ha.

 

PS: Mr Movieman:

 

Scott and McCrea made only westerns after about 1947 or so. If you love westerns....

 

Does a one legged duck swim in a circle? ha. I will take your advice sir.. I am always open to finding new favorites.

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Helllloooo Ms Favell!! :D

 

Brian Donlevy is definitely growing on me as an actor - especially in the roles where he shows a soft side

 

I need to check out that softer side more.. ha.. because USUALLY when I think of him it is either as A) a sniveling coward.. (like this movie) or B) a TOTAL monster and menace.. like Beau Geste.. he did a good job w/ BOTH those personas.. sometimes TOO good a job, oh my golly.. ha.

 

Have you seen Ride the High Country? Because McCrea and Scott are sooo..... GREAT in it. Yes, GREAT is the only word

 

I think I actually have seen the ending to this movie.. but not enough to get a feel for what it was all about. I think I need to check it out again sometime from the sound of it.

 

I totally understand what you are saying about Randolph Scott - for years I thought he was just a terrible actor, with cold slitty eyes and a really twangy Virginia accent. I could not see what the fuss was about

 

I likely sounded more negative about him last night than I intended. I do like him in some of the films I have seen.. he has just not really registered all that high on my "favorite" scale before. He just seems to often wear the same "stone" expression in everything.. I guess... But wow.. those screencaps you posted really tell a different tale.. you really CAN see the emotion under the surface... especially behind his eyes.. like in that cap you posted where he hears the news about the little boy. He must be one of those "still waters run deep" kinda guys.. you picked some REALLY good examples to hilight deeper side for sure.

 

I really do think he did a very good job in this movie.. and I also liked him in Seven Men from Now too.. so I think most of my issues w/ him will get resolved if I spend a little more time w/ some of his films. (Like they say.. ha. "Ignorance can be fixed" But I won't finish the rest of that quote.. it might work against me somehow.. HA!)

 

Richard Boone is just fantastic - and you have hit on his strength - he IS very conversational... I LOVE the way he tosses off his lines as if you were right there in the room with him. He doesn't seem to be acting at all.

 

I love how he talked to Mrs. Mims by the campfire (that first night) "Lady, you sure can cook" (or something like that) For some it might come off as a "ho-hum" passing line.. but for him.. you could hear the suprise.. the admiration.. and a hint of insult (as if he were "taunting and teasing" his prisoner) all at the same time.

 

If you EVER get the chance, I recommend HGWT - I don't think you will be disappointed. There are some episodes on you tube

 

Woo hoo!! Thanks for that, little lady. After reading comments about it from you and Miss G and others.. I will look forward to it. :-)

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> {quote:title=rohanaka wrote:}{quote}

> Helllloooo Ms Favell!! :D

>

> Brian Donlevy is definitely growing on me as an actor - especially in the roles where he shows a soft side

>

> I need to check out that softer side more.. ha.. because USUALLY when I think of him it is either as A) a sniveling coward.. (like this movie) or B) a TOTAL monster and menace.. like Beau Geste.. he did a good job w/ BOTH those personas.. sometimes TOO good a job, oh my golly.. ha.

 

Oh, I know! He's SO mean and nasty in Beau Geste, with his sneering attitude! And yet, just like Henry Fonda in Fort Apache, there is something in him that makes you not altogether despise him... you can't quite walk away from either character thinking they were totally wrong.

 

> I think I actually have seen the ending to this movie.. but not enough to get a feel for what it was all about. I think I need to check it out again sometime from the sound of it.

 

*Ride the High Country* is a purty good story, but Scott and McCrea take it to another level. It's almost like Peckinpah knew the reality of those actors' lives was the same as the characters they played. That gives the movie a second, more resonant meaning, to me anyway.

 

> I likely sounded more negative about him last night than I intended. I do like him in some of the films I have seen.. he has just not really registered all that high on my "favorite" scale before. He just seems to often wear the same "stone" expression in everything.. I guess... But wow.. those screencaps you posted really tell a different tale.. you really CAN see the emotion under the surface... especially behind his eyes.. like in that cap you posted where he hears the news about the little boy. He must be one of those "still waters run deep" kinda guys.. you picked some REALLY good examples to hilight deeper side for sure.

>

> I really do think he did a very good job in this movie.. and I also liked him in Seven Men from Now too.. so I think most of my issues w/ him will get resolved if I spend a little more time w/ some of his films. (Like they say.. ha. "Ignorance can be fixed" But I won't finish the rest of that quote.. it might work against me somehow.. HA!)

 

Ha! I remember my dad saying that Randolph Scott was good, and I was just flabbergasted... because my dad does not like westerns, nor is he one to say things lightly. I thought he was crazy! And then I started finding out about Budd Boetticher - everyone was so ooooh/aaaaah about his and Scott's westerns..... so I decided to watch a couple. That first one I saw, it so totally turned that stoic, stone faced character upside down that I sat there in shock in front of the TV. I realized that Scott was not what I thought at all.

 

Kinda like my stupid original opinion of John Wayne all over again. :D:D:D

 

> I love how he talked to Mrs. Mims by the campfire (that first night) "Lady, you sure can cook" (or something like that) For some it might come off as a "ho-hum" passing line.. but for him.. you could hear the suprise.. the admiration.. and a hint of insult (as if he were "taunting and teasing" his prisoner) all at the same time.

 

And how about that scene where he is telling her how awful her husband (who he just killed) was, and how she should be relieved! I actually loved that scene.... he was right, that Mims was a snake. He would have made her life a living .....well, you know.

 

> If you EVER get the chance, I recommend HGWT - I don't think you will be disappointed. There are some episodes on you tube

>

> Woo hoo!! Thanks for that, little lady. After reading comments about it from you and Miss G and others.. I will look forward to it. :-)

 

Be careful! It's addictive! You'll be running to the library asking for season 1 before you know it.

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*Hi to Rohanaka, Jack F., and Miss G:*

 

Here I am sticking my nose and it's two cents in, but. . . .

 

I think Miss G is the only one who knows I adore Randolph Scott, I've seen a lot of his movies 3 and 4 times if not more, and I love to talk about him whenever I can, especially to a new fan. My absolute favorite of his movies is *Ride Lonesome*, for a couple of reasons. Just as he is kind and gentle with Mrs. Mims, he is equally so with Karen Steele, not at first, but after a while you see what a fine, warm, and good gentleman he is. Talk about an expressive face!!! Another reason is Pernell Roberts. *Ride Lonesome* showed me what a really good actor he was, even after his time on Bonanza. In this, like Randy, he is stuck with a dope for a traveling companion, and the exasperation he entertains throughout the movie is a joy to behold. I often find myself giggling at his expressions. Randy's story is unbelievably sad and listening to him tell it makes you feel like you're overhearing a close friend confide his innermost secrets.

 

You definitely are not wasting your time if you watch Randolph Scott movies.

______________________________

*Anne*

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