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harlowkeatongirl

CHAPLIN OR KEATON?

70 posts in this topic

hee hee, don't worry, I've been called worse... :D

 

I am delighted to hear you enjoyed A Woman of Paris, and it is indeed a richly beautiful film-- I'm sure we both could have a field day dissecting it, but we're on the same page here, I believe.

 

Oh, and if you're a regular at the Silent Theater, I probably HAVE seen you! Even when they show 16 mm, an evening that includes a screening at that theater makes for a wonderfully good time! (Hee hee, maybe *you* were that obnoxious fella I sat behind last month when we went to see "It"! ;) I won't be able to make their showing of "King of Kings" next month, will you?)

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LOL That's okay... :D

 

Sometimes people read a little too much into things, no?

 

I wouldn't have gone into such a lengthy explanation of why I liked Keaton, because I didn't think it needed it. But apparently Gagman66 needed a better explanation (haha) so I gave one -- no holds barred. :P

 

Bottom line is, you just prefer what you prefer. It's rare that you have to put it into words. And having never thought about the "whys" much before... it was interesting not only to read other people's opinions of why they like what they like, it is also great insight into yourself!

 

This might be an interesting thing to write for the Keaton Chronicle. :) Something along these lines - What makes us like Buster Keaton? I have some great ideas. And since I was graciously granted the opportunity to write for them, w/out them having seen any of my previous work, I want to write something that really clicks on people's invisible light bulbs (and actually entertains at the same time! lol That's the tricky part.)

 

 

> oh and harlowkeatongirl, yes, I totally

> understand where you find the difference!! And this

> is such an interesting discussion, because when I

> watch Chaplin, I feel the exact same way as you do

> about Keaton!! ;) with Chas I *am* there right with

> him and loose contact with everything else for those

> wonderful six reels!

>

> And that's why I'm glad the Prof brought up that

> thing about art being subjective, because that is the

> wonderful truth of the matter.

>

> (I have to tell this to my Art History Professor-- at

> start of term she was always drilling us "art is

> subjective" when we launched into our heated

> debates... and now I'm compelled to go crawling on my

> hands and knees Monday morning and tell her 'you were

> right...)

 

 

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harlowkeatongirl-- Really??? You get to write for the Keaton Chronicle? As in THE Keaton Chronicle for the Damfinos?? *bows down in awe* How did you get a job like that, that's fantastic!

 

An article on the whyfores of Keatonism would be a great idea for an article, I must agree. (you *will* let us read whatever you come up with, of course! ;) )

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I just mentioned casually to other fans that I enjoy writing and hope to be published one day. Then a couple days later, I was offered the chance. LOL!

 

I'm not directly in the paid fanclub, so I have no idea what people usually write about in there, but I'll give it a shot. And I suppose it's a great excuse to get around to paying for a membership. :)

 

BTW --- I cannot wait for "Limelight" on March 31st. I think it sounds like a good one. Have you seen it, Carley?

 

 

 

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I consider Charles Chaplin to be the greatest film star of all time. Buster Keaton was also a wonderful comedian. I watched "Steamboat Bill Jr." for the first time this afternoon and it was absolutely fantastic. The stunts Keaton performed were incredible. My children, who are 12 and 14, were introduced to Chaplin's films about 5 years ago. They both enjoy his short films, and my son, who is very interested in theater arts, tries to emulate the little tramp (he was the tramp for Halloween one year). I am going to introduce my children to the wonderful films of Buster Keaton this week.

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Don't know how many of y'all saw A Woman of Paris the other night, directed but not starring Charlie Chaplin. I thought it was pretty good, but was struck by how much I've seen Adolphe Menjou lately and how typecast he seemed to be. I saw him in both Morning Glory (1933) & Stage Door (1937), both with Katharine Hepburn, and he played virtually the same role in both - a womanizing producer of plays on Broadway. His role in A Woman of Paris[i/] isn't much different. I guess when they needed a well-to-do ladies man with a casting couch, they cast him;- )

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What? Adolphe Menjou typecast? Surely you jest, Path! Or maybe you just haven't seen a lot of his movies . . .

 

This was the same guy who could play Marlene Dietrich's rich suitor in MOROCCO, the unscrupulous editor Walter Burns in THE FRONT PAGE, Gary Cooper's superior officer in A FAREWELL TO ARMS, the bookie "Sorrowful" Jones in LITTLE MISS MARKER, an eccentric Russian producer in GOLD DIGGERS OF 1935, a drunken Shakespearean actor in SING, BABY, SING, a movie studio head in A STAR IS BORN,

and Rita Hayworth's fiery father in YOU WERE NEVER LOVELIER, just to name a few besides the ones you mentioned.

 

Granted, Menjou tended to play men of the world, but a gangster can be a man of the world as well as an aristocrat, and Menjou knew the difference. That's what makes his performances so stimulating. He knew his way around.

 

Take, for instance, his work in the movies THE MILKY WAY and GOLDEN BOY. He plays fight promoters in both films, and manages to make both performances distinct -- one comedic, one dramatic. But he always makes the performances real. You don't doubt him for an instant in either picture.

 

One of Menjou's directors (Fred Niblo, I think) put it this way: "Menjou's not young, he's not old, he's just mature." Or, to put it another way -- he's timeless.

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I was obviously using the term incorrectly, sorry to offend. Yes, I've seen actor Menjou in a lot of other roles, like the ones you've mentioned. I guess I had just seen him in three films in such rapid succession where he was playing the mature character (great label!) described. Thanks for reminding me!

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Just to put my two cents in love Adolphe Menjou in

anything! Can't choose between Chaplain or Keaton

like them both. But i do have a special place in

my comedic heart for Harold LLoyd for the clock

segment just ingenious comedy way ahead of his

time in the respect. lolite.

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With Monsieur Verdoux being shown on Sunday, there has been a long debate whether Edna Purviance appears in this movie. Look closely at the woman who stands behind William Frawley in the wedding scene. I think it might be her.

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Leo? Don't you have a press conference to attend? For a guy who is having actors fight over who will star in the film adaptation of your crappy novel......you sure have a lot of time on your hands.

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CHAPLIN CHAPLIN CHAPLIN CHAPLIN

 

IM A HUGE CHAPLIN FAN IVE SEEN THE MAJORITY OF HIS FILMS

I HAVE SEEN THE MOVIE ON HIM

IM GOING TO READ MY AUTOBIOGRAPHY THIS SUMMER

 

KEATON IS GOOD AND HE INTRODUCED ME TO SILENT COMEDY BUT CHAPLIN IS MY FAVIORITE

 

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