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I was born in 1973 and I attribute my love of classic movies to the fact that these were the movies of my parents' generation. I love the music of their day as well. In fact as I write this I am watching a B&W DVD of The Rat Pack Live. I must say Frank and Dean are good, but Sammy Davis Jr.'s performance is amazing! He was unbelieveably versatile.

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retrobella, I love Sammy Davis Jr.! He was truly one of a kind. If you like to read, check out his autobiography "Yes, I Can!" You'll dig it, cat.

 

Sandy K

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retrobella & sandy--your appreciate for Sammy Davis Jr. reminds me that my original attitude toward him was formed largely as a result of his embarassing latter day apprearances on tv in an apparently drugged and disoriented state on such programs as Johnny Carson's Tonight Show in the '70s. At that time, I never understood when people talked about what a great entertainer he was--until an exceptional nun in my school had all of us read his autobiography, "Yes, I Can!" and in recent years when Biography on A&E ran a revealing program which included film of his early appearances on stage. He was a remarkable dancer, and wonderfully expressive singer. Too bad he left the party so soon--but the poor guy just wore his hardworking little body out.

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I'm 31. I probably wouldn't have cable if it wasn't for TCM. I'm addicted to it. I've always been fascinated with everything about the past... the clothing, mannerisms, speech, etc.

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Moira, funny that you should mention Sammy Davis Jr.'s appearances on Carson--that was probably where I became aware of Davis as a kid. I liked to stay up late and watch Johnny whenever I could--when my mother let me! As a kid, I never noticed that Davis was in a drug-induced state! I just always loved him. Plus, I had his record of "The Candyman." What kid didn't love that song? Now I can see a sinister double-meaning there!LOL!

 

Sandy K

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I'm 36, and I love classics since I was 5 or 6 years old...I remember watching my first classics, around 1972-73?..."Anna Karenina" (1935), "Mary of Scotland", and Vivien Leigh's "Anna Karenina" (1948), on Open TV....The suicide scenes in both Karenina's, impressed me quite a bit!!!! especially in Leigh's version 'cos she was standing facing the train on the railway!!!...on the other hand I haven't been able to erase from my mind, dignified, pretty Kate Hepburn (she looked gorgeous in period XVIth Century Costumes), walking to the scaffold!!...I love classics, 'cos both my parents loved films (and they grew up in the '40s and '50s), they're 62 right now and very healthy, thank god....especially dad, who loved biblical films and DeMille's in particular, he used to write down every film he saw, with its original datam, etc...Mum loved Tyrone Power and Charlton Heston...I also was very attached to my late maternal Granma and her second husband, who loved Shearer's "Smilin' Through", Colbert's "Imitation of Life", Dunne's "Magnificent Obsession" and Stanwyck's "The Bitter Tea of General Yen"...she loved Robert Taylor and Danielle Darrieux...He loved a movie, he said he had seen in the late 1930's, which told the tale of Genevieve of Brabant, which I haven't been able to locate...My paternal grandpa loved Joan Crawford...and my paternal Grandma, who died young, loved Gable...

 

So classics are in my blood!!

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Sorry I haven't been here in a while but let me just say COOL to roldfilm's post. I never thoght of it that way. Okay let me try, WB must of had a rough, gritty, kinda dirty street feel to it, Paramount maybe had a magestic feel to it as the logo implies, Columbia had a cheap feel to it (ha ha), RKO had a modern streame lined look, and Fox had a epic feel to it. Ah, another quality b&w has that color can't but don't get me wrong I love Technicolor and I know I'm probably wrong on a lot of the above.

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mutinyetc,

I think you are right on target with your remarks.One thing about WB that hasn't been mentioned too often is those thunderous movie scores!Even the gunshots and fist punches had a distinctive sound!When I was going to these movies as a boy,each studio such as Republic,Columbia,WB and Universal had distinctive sounds for their fist fights,gunshots,etc.Example...Republic went as far as to have one effect for their pistols and another for their rifles.Just a bit of trivia there!

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Ah yes, how could I forget WB's great sound they even had a whole orchestra for their cartoons. I wonder if Treg Brown was responsible for the features guns and fists effects. Hmm now lets see who I forgot to give credit to. We've covered two senses sight and sound umm, I guese mgm smelt good.(he he). Thank you for your posts.

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mutinyetc,

Speaking of smell,there was a movie by Mike Todd some years ago called SWEET SCENT OF MYSTERY. Packets containing different scents were placed under certain seats with the the scents released in conjunction with different portions of the film. I didn't see it but read a lot about it at the time. And dont forget the films such as EARTHQUAKE and MIDWAY,where you could "feel" the action!

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The actual title of the film was SCENT OF MYSTERY and it was produced by Michael Todd, Jr. I believe they had scents coming out of specially installed pipes in the theatre.

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Hello everyone. I'm 54, have had cable since the 1980s, but only since December has Cablevision in all their beneficence FINALLY decide to carry TCM, despite all my yearly phone calls of entreaty.

 

Suffice it to say that I'm in heaven!

 

I have loved black and white movies since I cried for King Kong when a child. It was my fervent wish to be locked in a room with every single black and white movie made in the 1930s and 1940s and not come out until I'd seen them all. Well, thanks to TCM (IF they don't do an AMC), I may get my wish.

 

I don't know where to start on my favorites, but I especially love film noir and any police drama where they venetian blinds, shadows on the floor or walls of the venetian blinds, and long dresses. However, I don't like costume dramas or dramas set in Colonial Times. I couldn't even bear to watch my beloved Walter Huston in one recently. But 'Dodsworth'? *sigh*

 

When AMC was a decent channel, I became enamored of Warren William. I was therefore quite happy recently to see that TCM showed quite a few of his movies, including some of him playing Perry Mason. I'll stop now, but I was pleased to finally realize TCM has a forum!

 

I look forward to (somehow) reading all your posts.

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Hello everyone. I'm 54, have had cable since the 1980s, but only since December has Cablevision in all their beneficence FINALLY decided to carry TCM, despite all my yearly phone calls of entreaty.

 

Suffice it to say that I'm in heaven!

 

I have loved black and white movies since I cried for King Kong when a child. It was my fervent wish to be locked in a room with every single black and white movie made in the 1930s and 1940s and not come out until I'd seen them all. Well, thanks to TCM (IF they don't do an AMC), I may get my wish.

 

I don't know where to start on my favorites, but I especially love film noir and any police drama where they venetian blinds, shadows on the floor or walls of the venetian blinds, and long dresses. However, I don't like costume dramas or dramas set in Colonial Times. I couldn't even bear to watch my beloved Walter Huston in one recently. But 'Dodsworth'?.....*sigh*

 

When AMC was a decent channel, I became enamored of Warren William. I was therefore quite happy recently to see that TCM showed quite a few of his movies, including some of him playing Perry Mason. I'll stop now, but I was pleased to finally realize TCM has a forum!

 

I look forward to (somehow) reading all of your posts.

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Hi deeanddaisy and welcome to the TCM boards. It's nice having a genuine movie buff join the crowd here. We get into many interesting topics about the movies and the stars and we would like you to feel free to join us. If you have any questions at all I'm certain that one of us can help you. In the meantime continue to enjoy movie heaven at TCM.

 

Mongo

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Yeah Dee...welcome...and I Love "Dodsworth" too!!! One of the 5 greatest american films of all time...if not the greatest...thanks to Huston's definitive performance, what a DEAR film is that one!!!

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Thanks bansi4 and feaito. Sorry for the double post, don't see a way to delete one!

 

Glad to see someone else loves 'Dodsworth' as much as I. There are certain films...like 'On Borrowed Time'...that have taken up residence in my brain, and I welcome their company. There are others, like 'Maltese Falcon' and 'Third Man', which I love gutturally but to this day don't comprehend.

 

I love 'Murder My Sweet' and any movie with Orry Kelly designs in it. I loved the fact that the 'stars' of the 1930s and 1940s would make a certain number of movies each year, just to fulfill their contract, and that some of these are the dearest films to me now. I love that the 'Wizard of Oz' was just a job to the cast (if I read correctly in my handbook) but is one of my all time favorites, even if it is one of the few color films that I like.

 

I adore movies from those two decades. With very few exceptions, I don't LIKE the 'star' system of today, where a Jim Carrey can get $26 million dollars for what is laughingly called a film. Similarly, Tom Cruise can get paid an equal amount for something that is no more than a 'star' vehicle.

 

I adore Cary Grant, Claude Rains, Edward G. Robinson, Paul Muni, Humphrey Bogart, John Garfield, Warren William, Lionel Barrymore, John Barrymore, Warner Oland, Sidney Toler, Ricardo Cortez, Harold Lloyd, Buster Keaton, William Powell, David Niven, John Mills, Dick Powell, and too many more to name. I dislike Gary Cooper, John Wayne and Clark Gable.

 

I thank you for calling me a 'film buff'. I consider myself a fanatic and not well enough educated on films. Hopefully, when I retire, I can pursue the study of film in more detail. I consider the history of movies, its work ethic, the studio system, the professionalism of past actors vs the current lazy star system in the U.S. (I believe the UK still has a decent training system although it too is getting lazy) to be of major import to anyone in the industry.

 

I probably have too much to say, and thank you for listening to me until I run out of stuff to post!!!!

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Thanks bansi4 and feaito. Sorry for the double post, don't see a way to delete one!

 

Glad to see someone else loves 'Dodsworth' as much as I. There are certain films...like 'On Borrowed Time'...that have taken up residence in my brain, and I welcome their company. There are others, like 'Maltese Falcon' and 'Third Man', which I love gutturally but to this day don't comprehend.

 

I love 'Murder My Sweet' and any movie with Orry Kelly designs in it. I loved the fact that the 'stars' of the 1930s and 1940s would make a certain number of movies each year, just to fulfill their contract, and that some of these are the dearest films to me now. I love that the 'Wizard of Oz' was just a job to the cast (if I read correctly in my handbook) but is one of my all time favorites, even if it is one of the few color films that I like.

 

I adore movies from those two decades. With very few exceptions, I don't LIKE the 'star' system of today, where a Jim Carrey can get $26 million dollars for what is laughingly called a film. Similarly, Tom Cruise can get paid an equal amount for something that is no more than a 'star' vehicle.

 

I adore Cary Grant, Claude Rains, Edward G. Robinson, Paul Muni, Humphrey Bogart, John Garfield, Warren William, Lionel Barrymore, John Barrymore, Warner Oland, Sidney Toler, Ricardo Cortez, Harold Lloyd, Buster Keaton, William Powell, David Niven, John Mills, Dick Powell, and too many more to name. I dislike Gary Cooper, John Wayne and Clark Gable.

 

I thank you for calling me a 'film buff'. I consider myself a fanatic and not well enough educated on films. Hopefully, when I retire, I can pursue the study of film in more detail. I consider the history of movies, its work ethic, the studio system, the professionalism of past actors vs the current lazy star system in the U.S. (I believe the UK still has a decent training system although it too is getting lazy) to be of major import to anyone in the industry.

 

I probably have too much to say, and thank you for listening to me until I run out of stuff to post!!!!

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Thanks bansi4 and feaito. Sorry for the double post, don't see a way to delete one!

 

Glad to see someone else loves 'Dodsworth' as much as I. There are certain films...like 'On Borrowed Time'...that have taken up residence in my brain, and I welcome their company. There are others, like 'Maltese Falcon' and 'Third Man', which I love gutturally but to this day don't comprehend.

 

I love 'Murder My Sweet' and any movie with Orry Kelly designs in it. I loved the fact that the 'stars' of the 1930s and 1940s would make a certain number of movies each year, just to fulfill their contract, and that some of these are the dearest films to me now. I love that the 'Wizard of Oz' was just a job to the cast (if I read correctly in my handbook) but is one of my all time favorites, even if it is one of the few color films that I like.

 

I adore movies from those two decades. With very few exceptions, I don't LIKE the 'star' system of today, where a Jim Carrey can get $26 million dollars for what is laughingly called a film. Similarly, Tom Cruise can get paid an equal amount for something that is no more than a 'star' vehicle.

 

I adore Cary Grant, Claude Rains, Edward G. Robinson, Paul Muni, Humphrey Bogart, John Garfield, Warren William, Lionel Barrymore, John Barrymore, Warner Oland, Sidney Toler, Ricardo Cortez, Harold Lloyd, Buster Keaton, William Powell, David Niven, John Mills, Dick Powell, and too many more to name. I dislike Gary Cooper, John Wayne and Clark Gable.

 

I thank you for calling me a 'film buff'. I consider myself a fanatic and not well enough educated on films. Hopefully, when I retire, I can pursue the study of film in more detail. I consider the history of movies, its work ethic, the studio system, the professionalism of past actors vs the current lazy star system in the U.S. (I believe the UK still has a decent training system although it too is getting lazy) to be of major import to anyone in the industry.

 

I probably have too much to say, and thank you for listening to me until I run out of stuff to post!!!!

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You've mentioned two great & very entertaining films "The Maltese..." and Carol Reed's "The Third Man"...both, of the best films made ever!

 

"On Borrowed Time" is of course in my must-see films, I've heard is enchanting, enthralling....Please try watching 1948's "Portrait of Jennie"....Have you seen Phyllis Calvert's "Madonna of the Seven Moons" and 1936's "Tudor Rose"?...Would love to have the opportunity to watch both of them!!!

 

You also have mentioned such skilled actors...John Mills was great in "Great Expectations" and "Hobson's Choice"...I love british films, like "Passport to Pimlico", "Blithe Spirit", "Major Barbara", "Pygmalion", "Storm in a Teacup"...

 

Try to catch Ricardo Cortez in "Symphony of Six Million" or Bill Powell in "One-Way Passage" and "My Man Godfrey"...among many others!!!

 

Again welcome fellow-film buff!!

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Hmmm, no I don't recall 'Portrait of Jennie', nor the two Phyllis Calvert mentions. I have to put them on *my* list!

 

Ditto to the Cortez and first Powell suggestion. I loved Carole Lombard in 'My Man Godfrey' and of course William Powell could act via a raised eyebrow.

 

My list of favored female actresses is almost as long as the male, but stranger, lol. Marie Dressler, Margaret Rutherford, Dame May Whitty and Edna May Oliver are among my picks. Funny, I guess I don't go for pretty in either gender.

 

By the way, I hope it doesn't happen again, but is there a setting I am missing on this site that is causing my multiple posts? I am mortified, but there doesn't seem to be a delete key. Am I missing something? Thanks.

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Dee, don't worry about the double or triple posts...it has happened before...to me too!!

 

Again you've named lovely character actresses: Dame May Whitty....what an actress!! "Night Must Fall", "The Lady Vanishes", "Gaslight"...those movies!!!...and great Edna May Oliver...the stubborn, strong characters she always played: "A Tale of Two Cities", "David Copperfield", "Pride and Prejudice", "Drums along the Mohawk".....and Maggie Rutherford..."Passport to Pimlico" and "Blithe Spirit" (already mentioned)...did I mention the Miss Marple films??....And another fave of mine the dotty old lady of "The Ladykillers", don't remember her name...what a great movie ...and that reminds me of Pete Sellers: "The Party", "Romanoff and Juliet", "Mouse that Roared", etc..

 

Marie Dressler is an actress of which I have definitely more to see of...My friend M.L. speaked on very good terms about the 1914 silent starring her and Chaplin "Tillie's Punctured Romance"...also gotta see her pairings with fellow Polly Moran, Tugboat Annie, Christopher Bean, Emma...oopps...only seen her in "Dinner at Eight", "Min and Bill" and "Anna Christie"...

 

and what about lovely, dear Laura Hope Crews, May Robson and also Jessie ralph....

 

Crews was great in GWTW and in Camille, and also in The Rains Came (short part) and in The Age of Innocence...

 

Ralph was great in the aforementioned Camille, Little Lord Fauntleroy (another Public Domain Copy), Captain Blood, San Francisco, The Blue Bird...

 

And May Robson In Lady for a Day, Anna Karenina, Bringing Up Baby!!!, Dinner at eight, et al....

 

Ooops!! also I'd forgotten Una O'Connor (outstanding in Bride of Frankenstein, Robin Hood, Sea Hawk, Invisible Man), Flora Robson (great in Fire Over England, Sea Hawk, Catherine the Great (with little known Elisabeth Bergner), Caesar and Cleopatra (what a name she had here: Ptatateeta), Wuthering Heights) and Aline MacMahon (great in Kind Lady, one of her few starring roles), the WB early thirties films, Dragon Seed, etc

 

We don't have this kind of actresses or personalities in our days!!!

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If I may jump in for just a second....about Marie Dressler....I first started paying attention to her when I saw her in "Dinner At Eight". Then I saw her in "Tillie's Punctured Romance" (an earlier Silent in which she gave a truly comical performance with Chaplin), and I faintly remember her in "Tugboat Annie" (wish TCM would show us this!!!), but it wasn't until I saw her in "Emma" that I was totally blown away by her. TCM does have this movie, so please watch for it and try to see/record it if you're a Marie Dressler fan. :)ML

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classicsfan, and everyone, I don't mean to monopolize, so tell me to shut up at any time if you wish. I have not seen those Marie Dressler films, I hope TCM shows them. Her doubletake and line to Jean Harlow in 'Dinner At Eight'....what a beauty, what a loss, Jean Harlow....was priceless.

 

But feaito, on Edna May Oliver!!!???? I am in awe of the woman, I can NOT get enough of her as Hildegard Withers with James Gleason as Oscar Piper in the series of movies they did. Wonderful, simply wonderful. Ahead of their time, in that she was a feminist, he was respectful of her, and their nuances bring tears to my eyes, they are that wonderful. Meanwhile, the very, very first I saw of her was a caricature in a Bugs Bunny cartoon!! And she did Miss Marple movies??????? Joan Hickson is my all time favorite television Miss Marple and I only know of Margaret Rutherford in films. Please TCM show some EMO Marple movies!

 

And 'Blithe Spirit'?....sigh....was Gene Tierney gorgeous or what? And that leads to 'Laura' and Dana Andrews and "dames".....and Clifton Webb....somebody stop me!

 

By the way, 'Stairway to Heaven' is another wonderful movie, and has nothing to do with any of the aforementioned!

 

Obviously, I am overjoyed to find this site, and thus will run off at the mouth for awhile. Please excuse me.

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