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sewhite2000

Everyone knows I'm just Secondhand Rose

45 posts in this topic

44 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Do you know if the Broadway stage musical had less songs than the movie,  or around the same number of songs, but just different ones?

There were more songs in the stage musical. If you include the reprise of “Don’t Rain On My Parade,” there were 16 songs in the original Broadway production.  For the movie adaptation all of the songs not sung by Fanny (Streisand) except for “If A Girl Isn’t Pretty” were cut, although as is often the case with film adaptations of stage musicals instrumental snippets of the cut songs can be heard in the movie (“Henry Street,” for example can be heard being played in Fanny’s mother’s saloon at the party celebrating Fanny’s Ziegfeld Follies debut).

In the Funny Girl movie there are only 13 songs if you count “Second Hand Rose,” which isn’t included on the movie soundtrack album.  

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3 hours ago, BagelOnAPlateOfOnionRolls said:

I think the question is meant to be "New?"  rather than "Noo?" since the Rose from the song's title has already established that she never gets anything new.

"Second Hand Rose" is one of a number of songs actually sung by Fanny Brice that were added to the movie adaptation of Funny Girl.  Others were "I'd Rather Be Blue" (with lyrics by Billy Rose, who would later marry Fanny Brice) and "My Man." None of these songs were featured in the Broadway stage musical Funny Girl, which also starred Barbra Streisand 

Um, yes, I knew that. I was just trying to spell it the way she pronounced it.

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The Beautiful conclusion number was called(" his is) "The only music that makes me dance"--

The only recording  of that beautiful number by Barbra is a course on the original Broadway  cast album . But the very last number in the show was the reprise of Don't Rain on My Parade."

"Ratatat tat" was Barbra's production number from a World War 1 Doughboy perspective. That production number was replaced with the Swan Lake Ballet in the movie.

By the way on the last night of the show on Broadway Barbra sang "My Man".You can hear it on YouTube but it's just audio.

 

4 hours ago, BagelOnAPlateOfOnionRolls said:

There were more songs in the stage musical. If you include the reprise of “Don’t Rain On My Parade,” there were 16 songs in the original Broadway production.  For the movie adaptation all of the songs not sung by Fanny (Streisand) except for “If A Girl Isn’t Pretty” were cut, although as is often the case with film adaptations of stage musicals instrumental snippets of the cut songs can be heard in the movie (“Henry Street,” for example can be heard being played in Fanny’s mother’s saloon at the party celebrating Fanny’s Ziegfeld Follies debut).

In the Funny Girl movie there are only 13 songs if you count “Second Hand Rose,” which isn’t included on the movie soundtrack album.  

 

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Your post makes me aware I've been misspelling Barbra's first name, something I've done on and off for many years. After a while, I always forget and stick that extra "a" in there. I think that's the more conventional way to spell the name, but not the only way, obviously. Apologies.

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20 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

Your post makes me aware I've been misspelling Barbra's first name, something I've done on and off for many years. After a while, I always forget and stick that extra "a" in there. I think that's the more conventional way to spell the name, but not the only way, obviously. Apologies.

Barbra was my teenage Idol because she was so talented and so unconventional!

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12 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

The Beautiful conclusion number was called(" his is) "The only music that makes me dance"--

The only recording  of that beautiful number by Barbra is a course on the original Broadway  cast album . But the very last number in the show was the reprise of Don't Rain on My Parade."

 

 

Actually Barbra Streisand also recorded "The Music That Makes Me Dance" on her A LOVE LIKE OURS album from 1999.

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Have you ever listened to the original Broadway cast album of funny girl?

If not you would truly enjoy it.

24 minutes ago, HoldenIsHere said:

Actually Barbra Streisand also recorded "The Music That Makes Me Dance" on her A LOVE LIKE OURS album from 1999.

 

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On 8/6/2018 at 12:58 PM, Princess of Tap said:

Have you ever listened to the original Broadway cast album of funny girl?

If not you would truly enjoy it.

Yes, I have. One of the songs from the play not used in the movie that I really like is "Who Are You Now?" I find the melody and the lyrics are very moving.

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I really like the number that Kay Medford did with Danny Meehan--

"Who taught her everything she knows"--

I know it's just a scenery changer, but it was such a star turn for Kay Medford.

 

The ubiquitous Broadway musical comedy support actress of the 50s and 60s was Jean Stapleton. She was the original Mrs. Strakosh.

They got Olive Oil, Mae Questel, to play it in the movie and she was simply marvelous .

But it would have been nice to see Edith Bunker again in that role just as she had been the original performer for the Damn Yankees and Bells Are Ringing shows, which she was able to recreate for posterity in the movies.

 

26 minutes ago, HoldenIsHere said:

Yes, I have. One of the songs from the play not used in the movie that I really like is "Who Are You Now?" I find the melody and the lyrics are very moving.

 

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How about some respect for the real thing:

Fanny Brice introduced the song at the Globe Theatre in the Ziegfeld Follies of 1921 (W.C. Fields was also in the cast). The Follies had been held at the New Amsterdam Theatre from 1913-1927, but 1921 was an exception, because Sally, starring Marilyn Miller was a gigantic hit and was held over.

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On 8/5/2018 at 10:47 PM, sewhite2000 said:

Um, yes, I knew that. I was just trying to spell it the way she pronounced it.

The reference is to the Yiddish exclamation, "Nu?," making it a pun/double entrendre with new.

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3 hours ago, Swithin said:

How about some respect for the real thing:

Fanny Brice introduced the song at the Globe Theatre in the Ziegfeld Follies of 1921 (W.C. Fields was also in the cast). The Follies had been held at the New Amsterdam Theatre from 1913-1927, but 1921 was an exception, because Sally, starring Marilyn Miller was a gigantic hit and was held over.

I always thought it was so wonderful that Frances Brice never gave up on doing a musical biography of her mother Fanny.

Frances was married to Hollywood producer Ray Stark and along with Jule Stein selected Barbra Streisand for the role-- Jule wrote the music and Ray produced the Broadway show, as well as the movie.

With Barbra's great success on Broadway and in Hollywood, Frances was assured that her mother, Fanny Brice, would never be forgotten in Show Business lore.

 

BTW-- Frances was, of course, also the daughter of Nicky Arnstein.

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31 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

I always thought it was so wonderful that Frances Brice never gave up on doing a musical biography of her mother Fanny.

Frances was married to Hollywood producer Ray Stark and along with Jule Stein selected Barbra Streisand for the role-- Jule wrote the music and Ray produced the Broadway show, as well as the movie.

With Barbra's great success on Broadway and in Hollywood, Frances was assured that her mother, Fanny Brice, would never be forgotten in Show Business lore.

 

BTW-- Frances was, of course, also the daughter of Nicky Arnstein.

A less successful story of a great talent whose life was set to a musical was Sophie Tucker (1887-1966). Steve Allen wrote the musical Sophie, but it only ran for a week in 1963, a year before Funny Girl opened. However, Sophie Tucker herself performed well into her old age, appearing often on television. Her recordings are a total joy; I particularly like "Red Hot Mama;" Aggravatin' Papa;" "You Gotta See Mama Every Night or You Can't See Mama at All;" and of course, her theme song, "Some of These Days."  Years after her death, Sophie received new acclaim via frequent mentions by Bette Midler.

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Unlike Peter O'Toole--who's career soared after his freshman outing with David Lean--did Omar Sharif ever do anything good after his tutelage under Lean was over?

Seems like a classic case of 'sophomore slump'. Sharif blazes in 'Lawrence' and 'Zhivago'...but what else? Enlighten me. I like the guy a lot, but he seems to have been consumed more by the traditional middle-eastern passion for gambling, than obsessed with making a filmography.

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59 minutes ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Unlike Peter O'Toole--who's career soared after his freshman outing with David Lean--did Omar Sharif ever do anything good after his tutelage under Lean was over?

Seems like a classic case of 'sophomore slump'. Sharif blazes in 'Lawrence' and 'Zhivago'...but what else? Enlighten me. I like the guy a lot, but he seems to have been consumed more by the traditional middle-eastern passion for gambling, than obsessed with making a filmography.

Arguably his biggest role in a successful film would be Funny Girl in '68. He starred in a number of high-profile, big budget flops, like Genghis KhanChe!The Last Valley. Sharif himself particularly blamed two movies, The Appointment (1969, directed by Sidney Lumet), and The Horsemen (1971, directed by John Frankenheimer), for causing his career collapse.

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Hey thanks for that comment. I'm not familiar with either 'Funny Girl' nor 'Funny Lady' (mentioned elsewhere in this thread).

I have seen 'Last Valley' with Sharif and Caine, written by Clavell and its probably the only other work of Sharif that I admire. I agree it was a financial flop, but Caine saves it for me. Its a strange film though; with a downbeat and unsatisfactory ending.

Anyway it just struck me today (Sharif's tailspin) because I saw him listed in the cast of a French crime thriller, 'The Burglars'. So that's why I posted. But yes, all these other mediocrities: 'Tamarind Seed', 'Green Ice', 'Night of the Generals', 'Mayerling'. (He was in 'Tamarind Seed', wasn't he?). And in 'Green Ice' he plays second fiddle to Ryan ONeal. When Ryan O'Neal can out act you, look out.

Because I have a mild interest in Afghanistan, I once purchased the DVD of 'The Horsemen' written by Josef Kessel. I thrilled to this novel as a lad (Kessel also wrote 'La Belle du Jour'); and I expected a lot from Frankenheimer, Trumbo, and Palance. But yeah its a dud.

Oh well. Sad saga, for Sharif. :(

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2 hours ago, slaytonf said:

Perhaps because he wasn't a very good actor.  David Lean made him look good.

 Omar Sharif did a good job in" Funny Girl "and reminded me a lot of Clark Gable because of his looks and despite his obvious accent. He was so handsome that he made the Henry Street Fanny Brice feel like a real Cinderella.

Lo and behold, if you could have only seen the real Nicky Arnstein.  LMREO

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10 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Arguably his biggest role in a successful film would be Funny Girl in '68. He starred in a number of high-profile, big budget flops, like Genghis KhanChe!The Last Valley. Sharif himself particularly blamed two movies, The Appointment (1969, directed by Sidney Lumet), and The Horsemen (1971, directed by John Frankenheimer), for causing his career collapse.

I like Gregory Peck and it seems like I went to see" Mackenna's Gold ", a Western in a movie theater and Omar Sharif was co-starring. The Thing is he doesn't stand out in the movie in my memory at all. But he certainly was getting top-notch roles in "A " movies in the late 60s and early 70s.

In recent years before his death, it seems like he occupied himself as a professional bridge player and expert.

When he died he got glowing reviews for " Lawrence of Arabia", "Doctor Zhivago" and "Funny Girl". The fan response was huge and warm.

Which doesn't surprise me because those three films were all blockbuster hits and Oscar-nominated-- only "Lawrence of Arabia" won best picture. 

The only reason I remember him at all is because he supported Barbra Streisand so marvelously in "Funny Girl" to her Oscar win.

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38 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

 Omar Sharif did a good job in" Funny Girl "and reminded me a lot of Clark Gable because of his looks and despite his obvious accent. He was so handsome that he made the Henry Street Fanny Brice feel like a real Cinderella.

Lo and behold, if you could have only seen the real Nicky Arnstein.  LMREO

Wiliam Wyler made him look good.  That may have been his asset.  He was malleable, so good directors could fashion him as they would.  Lacking that, his performance was lacking.

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