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brackenhe

Balance of Movie Eras

11 posts in this topic

I know some people complain about the favoring of one era of movies over another (I like precodes & silents, but not everyone does.)

Since I have no life, I made an analysis of the movies for May 2004. Some of these movies, especially 1990's & 2000's are documentaries. The breakdown is this:

 

10's & 20's 13

30's 63

40's 140

50's 95

60's 46

70's 15

80's 4 (must be Dustin Hoffman night)

90's & 00's 8 (mostly documentaries, one feature "White Fang")

 

For what it's worth, that shows that most of their films come from the 40's & 50's and a lot of the 30's films are '38 & '39 which are totally different than early 30's films. IMO they do show a very balanced schedule and if they favor anything it would be 1940-1959 movies.

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brackenhe,

 

I with ya on the Pre-Code and Silent films! There are people here who have said they would like to see fewer silent films on TCM, but as you have proved, they are not really that big a part of TCM's programming when you compare them to films from other eras. I would like to see More silents, personally, and to not upset those who don't care for them, broadcast them in the middle of the night. I'll tape them. Whatever.

 

Also, don't feel strange for your over-analysis of the TCM schedule. When I receive my monthly TCM guide in the mail, I set aside a little time to go over it in excruciating detail! Have I seen this?? Should I see that?? Who directed this?? Then I circle everything that remotely interests me. When I see that over half of the films are circled, I realize that I don't have time to invest in so many films. Ah, so many great films on TCM and so little time..........

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The 1930s, 40's and 50's have the bulk of the films that I really enjoy especially the film-noirs, melodramas and musicals. Good stuff.

 

Mongo

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Brackenhe, we all have a life. We may not be where we want to be (like me right now), but it's all good. I totally admire your knowledge about movies. There are people who make a living with movie trivia. I'm 38 yrs old and absolutely adore old movies. When the TCM program guide arrives, I go over it and over it again so as not to miss anything. You're not strange....you're cool!

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Thanks for the compliments--I'm not nearly as knowledgable as some others here, who seem to be professionals from their posts. I'm just a huge movie fan and the reason I like silents and precodes is that I don't know a lot about the stars & find it easier to get "lost" in the story. I think that's the problem with today's movie. We get to know the stars really well through Entertainment Tonight & People Magazine plus the thousands of talk shows they do to promote their shows/movies. Some of the mystique is gone. I read biographies of Clark Gable & Jean Harlow, and I still don't feel like I know them as well as someone like Tom Hanks (who I enjoy immensely, he's my favorite current actor.)

 

I wish I could make a living by just knowing about movies. I was on Jeopardy once but there were catagories other than movies, so I didn't win. I would love to be a film historian, but as I stated in another post somewhere that I don't know how to go about doing it PLUS I'M LAZY.

 

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Hey there, Brackenhe...cut yourself some slack, Buddy! You're no less a "professional" than anyone else around here. ;)

 

What makes us all "family", or members of a close-knit "community" here, is that we're all here for the same reasons...to share our love for, our interests in, our ideas about, and our knowledge concerning movies with others....to give and take and have a good time doing it. This already puts you in very good standing within our community, because you do this all the time....so please keep right on being yourself. Love you, as is. ML

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Thank you for the kind words. I've been reading the message boards for a long time before I ever posted anything, because I felt insecure. I always loved reading jeryson/patypancake's messages. He/she doesn't post here nearly as often as before and I've missed the pithy and insightful comments. I love reading yours, spences, slappy3500 and so many more. That's why I feel inadequate, because I don't feel like I express myself nearly as well as some of you.

 

BTW, ML, if I may call you that, I'm so glad you're back among us and that you're feeling much better. You take care of yourself. Allergies can be hell if you don't take care of yourself.

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Hey Brak I enjoy your posts! Don't let ignorance stop you...I never have :P I'll go on record as saying I prefer movies from the 40's up but can also enjoy the right silent.

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You're far from the only movie geek here. Typing this very post is a 26 year old **** who actually seeks out as many EL BRENDEL movies as he can find.

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El Brendel--wasn't he a Yiddish comedian from the 30's & 40's? I'm not that familiar with him but most of the old movies I see are on TCM, therefore mostly Warner & MGM movies. Paramount had a lot of comedians in movies and I don't think TCM shows a lot of those, like when they had the Bob Hope tribute earlier this week they showed a lot of his later movies, when probably most of his best were made a Paramount. Am I right about this or just making stuff up? I'm not sure.

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El Brendel was actually a SWEDISH dialect comedian signed to Fox, and an unfunny one at that! Yet, with the advent of sound and the in-flux status of Hollywood's comic titans at the time (Keaton floundering at MGM, Chaplin working on City Lights at a snail's pace), a void was made, which Brendel filled. He was actually considered one of cinema's most ingenius comics for a VERY brief time period, even meriting a starring role in Just Imagine (1930), but watching him today is an exercise in ****. He's become something of an in-joke between my 73-year old cinephile father and myself, and we go out of our way to find any film which features him, even if only in a perfunctory fashion.

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