laffite

Re Favorite BBC Productions, Plays, TV, etc...

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Maybe it's time for the BBC (and related matter) to have a thread of its own. So far, these discussions have been hosted by other threads and are scattered about here and there. So BBC television dramas, filmed plays or filmed stage productions, or anything related is fair game here...

 

laffite

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Hi *_Jackie._*..you wrote:

 

*I would love to see a version of "A Doll's House" in which Torvald is NOT portrayed as a bit of a monster....*

 

Well, Torvald is Torvald. I just wonder if Anthony is too nice a guy to play him.

 

*Nora is not one of my favorite characters, maybe because she is closer to my own personality (I always wanted to play Hedda instead, she is far more exciting), but I think it's time I took another look at her, from a more mature place in my life. I remember seeing a BBC version of Hedda Gabler with (?) Janet Suzman? I think, and it was such a great part - then when I was in college I kept getting cast as Thea in scene studies.... very disillusioning......Sadly, I would probably make a pretty good Nora.....*

 

I don't understand why playing Nora should be so "sad" to play in the way I think you mean. Her bearing and demeanor on a minute-by-minute basis anyway do not suggest the downtrodden and repressed, not to me, anyway...although she apparently harbors illusions that supposed to suggest that she is. But I think I like Nora better than you do, I like her spunk (I wouldn't want to play her though ;) )

 

UPDATE: To my delight, I found in my archives Juliet Stevenson as Nora in the original broadcast with none other than the venerable one, Alaister Cook, as host. If you haven't seen either one of these, Jackie, I would probably recommend this one (Netf has it.) For one thing, it is probably more complete. The Hopkins-Bloom version was apparently cut and some of the dialogue is moved around. I think both Stevenson and Trevor Eve are probably truer representative of their respective characters, taking nothing away, however, from the Hopkins-Bloom team. Juliet is a bit more scattered and vulnerable. Trevor Eve is severe and domineering in a way that Hopkins seems not to be and is more unctuously condescending to his "little songbird." He has a scene where he becomes exuberantly frisky with Juliet, chasing her around the room. He is unbelievably good here and is almost likable. When Juliet lowers the boom Trevor Eve is the picture of a man deconstructing before your very eyes, some of the finest acting I've seen in a long time.

 

I have not seen nor read Hedda Gabler, so I don't know anything about Hedda nor Thea. Jackie, have you done some acting? Come on, now, let's hear a little about that. :)

 

*House of Cards was AWESOME! Witty, frightening, epic, suspenseful, timely, and tremendously fun! I am a big fan of first person narrative, and more to the point, characters talking to the camera. Sir Ian Richardson..... well, there is nothing to say that hasn't already been said of his great performance.....*

 

Ouch! I haven't seen House of Cards. I've just put the first one in my queue.

 

*As for the few other recent BBC dramas I have seen, none seems to compare to the earlier stuff.....*

 

True. The BBC is still probably doing some good things but what they show on Masterpiece Theatre has certainly suffered compared to earlier times.

 

*_Movieman (Chris)_* sez: *I love BBC productions too. I go all the way back to "Danger UXB" and "House of Cards...Moll Flanders" from the mid 1990's was also quite fun.*

 

Hi Chris! I was morbidly fascinated with Danger UXB when it was on. I thought some of that was harrowing. What a great idea for a drama...unexploded bombs, ooh... And yes, Moll Flanders was really good. I'm glad you mentioned that, I might go after that one again. I have that actress' face brightly in mind but I cannot name her off hand. I seem to recall this production being appropriately spicy as needs be. O that Moll!

 

//

 

Message was edited by: laffite

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So while I was typing, you moved away...... :)

 

*I don't understand why playing Nora should be so "sad" to play in the way I think you mean. Her bearing and demeanor on a minute-by-minute basis anyway do not suggest the downtrodden and repressed, not to me, anyway...although she apparently harbors illusions that supposed to suggest that she is. But I think I like Nora better than you do, I like her spunk (I wouldn't want to play her though ;) )*

 

Only sad to me, because I always dreamed of playing dashing (can a woman be dashing?) or headstrong and defiant characters - the complete opposite of my own nature. When you are young, all you want is to play Martha in Virginia Woolf or Elizabeth the Queen - roles that are totally unsuited to a young woman, heh heh! You are always striving to play the grandiose and overbearing. Or whatever is not YOU. It's all very romantic and selfish - because you have no real knowledge of acting. You simply want to be noticed. As you age you realize that it can be fun to play the shy, the weak or the normal too. At this point, I can see how much more there is to the character of Nora than I ever thought when I was in school - tons of indecision, desperation and finally honesty. And Nora may be the most reactive character that Ibsen ever wrote - and acting is all about reaction, isn't it? not about showing off or grandstanding..... I see this now.... but if you had asked me at 20, I would have said Nora is boring..... :)

 

And that, Monsieur, is the story of my acting career...... :)

 

PS. Molo if you found the thread -- I LOVE The Six Wives of Henry VIII! I have never seen a portrayal of any of the wives or especially Henry that I thought was better. So sorry, Charles Laughton.......And yes, Annette Crosbie is the wife that I remember the best from the production, too. She was super!

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He moved while I was typing too. :)

 

Well since I did type something BBC related I will offer it up here.

 

I own copies of the 1970's BBC productions of The Six Wives of Henry VIII and Elizabeth R. I thought Keith Michell and Glenda Jackson were both spectacular in each of the title roles. I seem to be in a distinct minority, but I am facinated by these productions. As a lifelong student of history, I find the attention to historical detail that comes through in the dialog and the chronology of events that take place in these productions very well done.

 

They are very stagey of course, "cheesy" is the word I most often hear used about them, but I really enjoy them. Annette Crosbie's portrayal of Catherine of Aragon is the most historically accurate I've ever seen. Much more so than even Irene Papas in Anne of the Thousand Days.

Vivien Pickles, who most people remember for her delightful performance as Harold's unflappable mother in Harold and Maude, also appears as Mary Queen of Scots.

 

Anyway that is the only contribution I can make right now regarding BBC productions.

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Hey Molo

 

*Thanks for making me sound highbrow enough to actually know very much about BBC productions.*

 

Oh, you mean you're not highbrow! Good! We don't like high brows here. High brows are expressely forbidden to post here. They are so...you know, high brow. ;)

 

*I just thought you would want to know. :)*

 

I noticed the error and made the change. But you are too quick for me. You high brows are really fast... ;) Apologies to Chris for the error.

 

*Unfortunately, as is evidenced by my recent posts, I have been straying lately more toward Lassie, the Bowery Boys, and how Norma Shearer looked without make up. :D*

 

Well, anyone who is not watching the BBC would do very well where you're straying. ;)

 

*I do however own copies of the 1970's BBC productions of The Six Wives of Henry VIII and Elizabeth R. I thought Keith Michell and Glenda Jackson were both spectacula...*

 

They are great, the both of them. My favorite episodes of Wives are III and IV. The latter was Annette Crosbie, am I right. It's been awhile but that Catharine was a toughie, wasn't she. Now that's how you handle royalty. The actress who played Jane Seymour was good too. That's my favorite episode. I'm trying to remember the joke she told him about the horse. Do you remember? These episodes have to be revisited.

 

*They are very stagey of course...*

 

Oooh, I hate that word. I only use it when it is over-the-top in some way. There are times when the quality of staginess can be effective and entertaining.

 

*Anyway that is the only contribution I can make right now regarding BBC productions. :)*

 

Thanks for posting. As a history buff, I hope you will be back here with more.

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*_Jackie_* sez: *So while I was typing, you moved away...... :)*

 

*_Molo_* sez: *He moved while I was typing too. :)*

 

As you can see, my timing is impeccable. Yike!

 

This thread won't be prolific but at least the matter will be in one place from now on. Now that we have Netflix and the like these old productions are no longer the stuff of esoterica (is that word? we have to be high brow here ;) ) because many of them are available.

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Places everyone! Places! :D

 

I think we have it all straight now. :)

 

I want to comment on some things you and Jackie mentioned. I'll be back.

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Thank you, laffite, for starting this thread. I would hope in addition to BBC productions, we could also include those of Britain's Channel 4. They've done some great work in the past, including *Elizabeth I* with Helen Mirren and Jeremy Irons, surely one of the very best British productions of this decade.

 

As for BBC productions, I would really like to recommend the 1991 *Enchanted April* directed by Mike Newell. This movie actually received a theatrical release in the U.S. via Miramax, but I'm almost certain it was shown on the BBC in Britain. It's going to be shown on TCM next Tuesday, Feb. 10 at 10pm ET:

 

*Enchanted April* (1991)

Four women search for happiness on an Italian vacation.

Cast: Miranda Richardson, Joan Plowright, Josie Lawrence, Polly Walker Dir: Mike Newell C-93 mins, TV-PG

 

It really is a lovely, sweet movie. The cast is really good, too!

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*Enchanted April (1991)*

*Four women search for happiness on an Italian vacation.*

*Cast: Miranda Richardson, Joan Plowright, Josie Lawrence, Polly Walker Dir: Mike Newell C-93 mins, TV-PG*

 

 

I was once chided for liking this movie so much. I was told it was a chick flick. No matter, the film is an exercise in excellence. I remember being so taken that I watched it more than once and in a relatively short of period of time. This movie is flawlessly directed. Also rounding out the cast is Jim Broadbent and Michael Kitchen. Also, Josie Lawrence's movie husband, is his name Medina? The movie weakened a bit for me near conclusion as it veered a bit to closely to the syrup, but all in all a minor flaw, considering all that came before. Miranda Richardson is a favorite, where has she been lately? I may have more to say about this one as I watch again. Thanks for the heads up on the schedule.

 

And yes, anything goes here along these lines. Seeing Newell and Miranda in the same sentence reminds of another movie, Dance With a Stranger, which came a few years earlier. Rupert Everett is so young in this one you won't recognize him. Miranda is excellent. The story of a real person and a real incident.

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I agree with you, laffite, it is definitely an exercise in excellence. Yes, it might be a bit of a chick flick, but what's wrong with that? :P Seriously, I think intelligent guys will definitely find something in here to like, or at the very least enjoy the very pretty ladies in the cast - Polly Walker and Miranda Richardson are certainly photogenic, if you ask me.

 

Mike Newell is quite a good director who maybe isn't a household name, but *Enchanted April* was a good hit in the arthouse circuit in America and probably helped him a lot in getting hired for bigger budgeted movies, like *Four Weddings and a Funeral* and one of the *Harry Potter* sequels.

 

Josie Lawrence's husband in the movie is played by British actor Alfred Molina, who has been in everything from *Raiders of the Lost Ark* to *Spider-Man 2*, but he's actually quite good in small, low-budget movies like this one. (I believe he's a Shakespearean trained actor).

 

Here is a poster from the U.S. release:

 

enchanted_april.jpg

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I have Enchanted April marked on the calendar, so I can record it....

 

I like the movie a lot- although like you said, it gets a bit too much at the end. I particularly liked Polly Walker as the slightly dangerous but basically bored heiress. Miranda Richardson gives a perfect performance as usual, and in a role I would never have thought of casting her in. I like Joan Plowright more here than in almost any of her other recent performances, but the entire cast deserves praise for ensemble acting. I hate to say it, but the 1935 version with Ann Harding just makes me want to watch this one......

 

Dance with a Stranger I saw so long ago that I didn't even realize it was Rupert Everett - I remember thinking it was really good, but being completely weirded out at the same time by the love/hate thing going on. If you rent these two movies back to back you will realize what a great actress Miranda Richardson is, since the two characters are to put it mildly, worlds apart......she's so brittle as Ruth in "Dance" and so soft in "Enchanted". Then go rent Blackadder II and see why Miranda makes this one is my favorite of the series....

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"Moll" was played by Alex Kingston. She was late of "ER" here. Also a small part for Daniel Craig. And spicy is a good way to describe it.

 

As for Josie Lawrence she first came to my attention in "Whose Line Is It Anyway." The English version of course.

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mon swasheroo!!!

 

good evening!

 

i love BBC!!! they are so imaginative! i love all the Maggie Smith movies, especially, The Millionairess, i think is what its called. grandmama has that one on DVD. i have watchehd it lots of times and love it!

 

...and of course, you know i had to add Helen Mirren! heehee! i love every one of her BBD movies and mini-series, especially The Little Minister, which they showed on Masterpiece Theater. i also love her Prime Suspect movies, courtesy of Cinemaven, who told me about them, and Painted Lady, which should be considered one of her best works. but i love the early BBC movies she did in the late 60s and 70s and 80s. those are the best! she was also in multiple versionos on Macbeth, Hamlet, A Midsummer Night's Dream and Anthony and Cleopatra.

 

Helen in The Changeling

 

The%20Changeling.jpg

 

Midsummer Night's Dream (1981)...i cant find good pics from her (1968) version.

 

msnd81.jpg

 

midsummer2.jpg

 

Message was edited by: butterscotchgreer

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*Molo wrote* Unfortunately, as is evidenced by my recent posts, I have been straying lately more toward Lassie, the Bowery Boys, and how Norma Shearer looked without make up.

 

*Laffite wrote* Well, anyone who is not watching the BBC would do very well where you're straying.

 

Hey Laffite

 

I think it's best to be well rounded in all things as much as possible. If you can't write long winded essays on the thematic elements of a John Ford western or the sense of loss and desperation found in the characters that inhabit noir without also being able to seriously contemplate whether Shirley Booth's Hazel character was really a true friend to man or just an insufferable busybody, well... life would be so colorless. ;)

 

*Molo wrote:* I do however own copies of the 1970's BBC productions of The Six Wives of Henry VIII and Elizabeth R. I thought Keith Michell and Glenda Jackson were both spectacula...

 

*Laffite wrote:* They are great, the both of them. My favorite episodes of Wives are III and IV. The latter was Annette Crosbie, am I right. It's been awhile but that Catharine was a toughie, wasn't she. Now that's how you handle royalty.

 

Annette Crosbie played Catherine of Aragon is episodes 1 and 2. I think you might be thinking of episode 5 with Catherine Howard who was executed. I'm not sure. I do agree they are both great shows.

 

 

 

*Laffite wrote:* The actress who played Jane Seymour was good too. That's my favorite episode. I'm trying to remember the joke she told him about the horse. Do you remember? These episodes have to be revisited.

 

I like all the episodes. The first one is my favorite but they are all very interesting to watch. The actresses playing the Queens were perfectly cast. I'll try and remember the joke.

 

It seems their was a man who was to executed by King Louis of France. He bargained with the King that if he spared him he would teach the King's favorite horse to talk. The King gave him one year to accomplish this. Later the man is asked why he made such a foolish bargain. He could never teach the horse to talk and he would be executed in a year.

 

Ahh said the man.

But in a year, the horse may die

or King Louis may die

or the horse may talk

 

Apparently that was a real knee-slapper in the 16th century. :) I'm sure I'm getting some of it wrong I'll check on that for you.

 

*Molo wrote:* They are very stagey of course...

 

*Laffite wrote:* Oooh, I hate that word. I only use it when it is over-the-top in some way. There are times when the quality of staginess can be effective and entertaining.

 

It's a term people have used when telling me why they don't like it. I understand what you mean. Your last sentence is very true.

 

*Laffite wrote* Thanks for posting. As a history buff, I hope you will be back here with more.

 

I love history. I will be back. :)

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*Jackie wrote:* I LOVE The Six Wives of Henry VIII! I have never seen a portrayal of any of the wives or especially Henry that I thought was better. So sorry, Charles Laughton.......And yes, Annette Crosbie is the wife that I remember the best from the production, too. She was super!

 

Annette Crosbie played Catherine of Aragon who was Henry's first wife. She was six years older than Henry and her story actually precedes Henry's as it does in the series. She would have appeared in episodes 1 and 2. She was the daughter of Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain and you would have been hard pressed at the time to find anyone else in Europe with a better royal pedigree.

 

Catherine3.jpg?t=1233908066

*Catherine Princess Dowager in limbo waiting to see if Henry will marry her.*

 

The thing people tend to forget was that, of all of Henry's wives, she had the most power in her relationship with Henry. She was too well connected for him to just do away with her. Her nephew was the most powerful monarch in Europe. She had the Pope backing her up. She was more popular with the English people than Henry and she could have raised an army against him and in favor of their daughter Mary and quite possibly have won. She didn't want to do that though. She simply wanted to continue being Henry's wife and Queen of England.

 

 

Catherine4.jpg?t=1233908255

*Henry proposes.*

 

Catherine5.jpg?t=1233908424

*On her Wedding day. Catherine the Queen! Triumphant!*

 

 

Her story is too complex to go into every detail but she had spent years at the English court of Henry's father completely focused on the goal of becoming Queen of England. It was what she had been sent from Spain to do. It was her destiny. When old Henry died, young Henry chose her to be his wife. Technically she was his sister-in-law. The widow of Henry's older brother. She claimed that brief marriage was never consummated. That would be a sticking point years later. They got a quick dispensation from the Pope and basically lived the good life for eighteen years. There marriage marred only by Catherine's failed pregnancies and the loss of a son in infancy. Still they had one healthy child in their daughter Mary. Henry probably would never had considered divorcing her if that ambitious homewrecker Anne Boylen hadn't come along. :)

 

catherine6.jpg?t=1233908620

*Henry and Catherine*

 

There is much surviving evidence in their own letters and letters written about them, that they were happy and in love. Henry took mistresses, though less then many of his contemporaries, and Catherine duly ignored them. Then along came Anne. A woman Catherine could not ignore.

 

catherine7.jpg?t=1233908814

*The Happy Years*

 

This all played out brilliantly in the BBC series. It's really the only time the relationship between Henry and Catherine is explored on film in any depth. Annette Crosbie gives so much life to the part. She is mesmerizing. Young Catherine is shown as determined and stubborn, yet vulnerable and always regal. Crosbie brings such great energy to the part. Her facial expressions wonderfully capturing every nuance in mood. Her voice going from musical whisper to lion's roar as the emotional intensity of the scene warrants.Incredibly single-minded in pursuit of her goal but clever enough to reason with when necessary.

 

This is brought out in the scene where the Spanish ambassador warns her to quit writing letters to people she thinks are her friends but may be working against her. She dismisses him, gets angry and frustrated, but she still heeds his advice. It's a key scene. She is caught in a constant whirl of intrigue. She labors for six long years in a strange land. Her warmth and her genuine affection for Henry, is also brought out in their scenes at the beginning of their marriage.

 

catherine8.jpg?t=1233909088

 

Her marriage lasted some twenty-six years and the episode has an almost epic feel created mainly through Crosbie's perfomance. Through all the deprivations she would face, Crosbie's Catherine never loses her key traits. She is stubborn and loyal to Henry through it all.

 

catherine9.jpg?t=1233909225

*Henry comforts Catherine after the loss of their son.*

 

There is that wonderful scene where Henry tells Catherine very gently, that they should separate. He does it gently because he knows her well enough to suspect her reaction and he doesn't want to deal with it. She looks at him intently. When it is clear to her what he is finally saying, she erupts completely. Not in anger but in complete and total anguish. She has the horrible realization that she has lost his support and with it her only reason for living. She lets out a dreadful wail that comes deep from her soul and echoes through the halls of the palace.

 

catherine10.jpg?t=1233909360

*A separation. The beginning of the end.*

 

 

Catherine could have lived comfortably for the rest of her life if she had only acquiesced to his demands. She could not. She was sent away. Her only child forbidden to see her. She was back where she had started.

 

catherine11.jpg?t=1233909571

*A lioness in exile.*

 

Nearly alone in a strange land removed from all she worked for and all that brought her comfort. All because she refused to go against the truth as she believed it. She stood like a rock against the current of history.

 

catherine12.jpg?t=1233909732

*A final act of defiance. Denying Henry's request for their dead son's christening robe to be used for Henry and Anne's awaited birth.*

 

 

There was no quick death. She lingered and suffered her last days knowing that she had achieved her dream and then lost it. Her final letter was a love letter to Henry. I find her story the most poignant and tragic of all of Henry's wives. Annette Crosbie was given a rare chance to bring her story to life and she delivered.

 

 

catherine13.jpg?t=1233910149

*Catherine on her deathbed. It is done.*

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> {quote:title=JackFavell wrote:}{quote}

> I have Enchanted April marked on the calendar, so I can record it....

>

> I like the movie a lot- although like you said, it gets a bit too much at the end. I particularly liked Polly Walker as the slightly dangerous but basically bored heiress. Miranda Richardson gives a perfect performance as usual, and in a role I would never have thought of casting her in. I like Joan Plowright more here than in almost any of her other recent performances, but the entire cast deserves praise for ensemble acting. I hate to say it, but the 1935 version with Ann Harding just makes me want to watch this one......

 

I agree the whole cast is absolutely great, and the locations were also pretty gorgeous (at least that's how I remember them). I did record the 1935 version but somehow or other I've never gotten around to watching. Maybe I should try to watch both versions back to back.

 

>

> Dance with a Stranger I saw so long ago that I didn't even realize it was Rupert Everett - I remember thinking it was really good, but being completely weirded out at the same time by the love/hate thing going on. If you rent these two movies back to back you will realize what a great actress Miranda Richardson is, since the two characters are to put it mildly, worlds apart......she's so brittle as Ruth in "Dance" and so soft in "Enchanted". Then go rent Blackadder II and see why Miranda makes this one is my favorite of the series....

 

I did watch *Dance with a Stranger* but it was a long time ago and at the time it was only available on VHS, which didn't quite do justice to the movie, imho. I'd definitely like to watch it again, especially if there's a DVD of it with a good transfer.

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Bonjour Helenfan extraordinaire!

 

*...and of course, you know i had to add Helen Mirren! heehee!*

 

Absolutely! I see you mentioned our favorite, "The Little Minister", and thanks to you I found out about this?and I even own my very own copy ;) , a real gem. You refer to those plays that Helen did for the BBC, ?The Play of the Week? on British television and some of which are available on NetFlix. You have a boxed set, but for the rest of us, we can do a search on Helen Mirren and there they are, some of them anyway. I do need to catch up on my Helen Shakespeare although I have seen the ?68 version of Midsummer (a long time ago, alas) in which she plays Hermia, (Diana Rigg plays the other young lover and no other than Ian Holm plays, you guessed it, Puck). I have a VHS copy of that somewhere that I got off the tv.

 

Thank you for posting those pictures of Helen. They are nicely chosen, giving us three quite different Helens. I like the menacing, but beautiful Tatania. And that?s Tatania lying down as well, n?est-ce pas? How appealing she looks (sigh), O Beautiful Helen.

 

And, Meine Kleine Butterscotcherin, thanks for dropping by the new thread on the block and don?t be a stranger, okay? BTW, did you see the alert for Enchanted April coming up on Feb 10 on TCM? Have you seen that one? If not, this is your TCM homework for the week. I figure any movie with three love stories in one is something that you will enjoy ;)

 

*"Moll" was played by Alex Kingston.*

 

Hi Chris, thank you for that. I should look these things up?And I?m corrected on Alfred Molina (thanks, FF), Josie?s husband, who says, ?You?re not eating your fish, give it here, it?s a shame to waste it,? while she desperately tries a way to tell him about the trip.

 

...minor spoilers

 

The husbands are hopeless. Jim Broadbent writes a serial, or something, about Esmeralda, an Egyptian slave girl, and talks cynically about this with his wife (MirandaR) who stares straight ahead with a glazed look and with total exasperation, thinking how hopeless it all is. When I watched this for the first time I wondered why the ladies just didn?t leave them altogether. There?s Jim leering at Polly with that goofy grin, yike. And the marvelous scene when he climbs the stairs and at the point of exhaustion looking for...but wait, I?ll say no more. But what happens next almost made me do a weepie and that?s unheard for someone as unsappy as me ;) . I?m really glad this one is coming up, I?m ready.

//

 

EDIT:

 

Hi, *_Molo_*, I just saw your entries. Yes, I was in error. The two episodes to which I refer are Anne Seymour and then Anne of Cleves, which I believe are III and IV. And I think you have the joke right. I think it's funny. I mean it's one thing to buy time but it's something else again to be a hopeless optimist. You never know what a horse may do, though ;)

 

Message was edited by: laffite

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Oh, molo! Those are beautiful caps from the "Catherine of Aragon" episodes. You made me remember a lot more than I did before - all I could remember was the stubborn vulnerability (you said that perfectly) of Catherine's later years - and the scene in which she loses her Henry. I somehow remember a sequence of scenes of Henry sending emissaries to Catherine, and her saying No over and over, in different ways, as if her heart would burst each time. But maybe I am thinking of another film..... I liked that Crosbie played Catherine with all her heart, and yet, you still get the idea that she was clever and thoughtful - each decision or answer to Henry's demands had to be well thought out or she would have been completely done. However, there is no doubt that her bottom line was that she loved Henry. I still like Catherine best of all the wives, probably due to this series, which I have been wanting to buy for a while now. I should just bite the bullet, but with the economy being what it is, I don't know.....

 

I still like Six Wives, The Forsyte Saga, I Claudius and Upstairs, Downstairs the best of all the series that have ever been run on Masterpiece Theatre. I remember my family sitting up to watch week after week - it was the only TV my mother would watch. I cried last year when my dad bought me the complete set of Upstairs, Downstairs and I still get choked up thinking about it - he is not very demonstrative, but he remembered how much I liked it and I would never have a chance to own it without his wonderful gift.

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The husbands are hopeless.

 

I almost said the same thing in my earlier post..... WHY did they ever go back to them? Ah. well..... :)

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bonjour johnnny on the spot!

 

...and of course, you know i had to add Helen Mirren! heehee!

 

Absolutely! I see you mentioned our favorite, "The Little Minister", and thanks to you I found out about this?and I even own my very own copy , a real gem. You refer to those plays that Helen did for the BBC, ?The Play of the Week? on British television and some of which are available on NetFlix. You have a boxed set, but for the rest of us, we can do a search on Helen Mirren and there they are, some of them anyway. I do need to catch up on my Helen Shakespeare although I have seen the ?68 version of Midsummer (a long time ago, alas) in which she plays Hermia, (Diana Rigg plays the other young lover and no other than Ian Holm plays, you guessed it, Puck). I have a VHS copy of that somewhere that I got off the tv.

 

you might have a copy of it?! my jaw just dropped! find it, what are you waiting for?! heehee! ill let you have your rum back...for a second anyway.....we cant have a pirate in a drunken rage going around to people's camp fires singing silly songs about innocent people can we? heehee!

 

i find it amazing how may versions of Anthony and Cleopatra she has done. for all her Shakespearean work on BBC and on stage, she won the Laurence Olivier Shakesperean award a while ago.

 

Thank you for posting those pictures of Helen. They are nicely chosen, giving us three quite different Helens. I like the menacing, but beautiful Tatania. And that?s Tatania lying down as well, n?est-ce pas? How appealing she looks (sigh), O Beautiful Helen.

 

your welcome! have your seen The Country Wife yet from that box set off netflix? yes you are right, that is her playing Tatania lying down there on the cover.i would love to see that version as well to comapre it to her 1968 version. unfortunately it isnt on DVD yet. hopefully they will release it soon.

 

there is another one i particularly like and i dont remember if i suggested it to you yet.....it is not available on DVD, but you can watch it on youtube. it is The Little Mermaid (not the Disney version, although that one is wonderful too) Helen plays a princess and is engaged to a prince played by Treat Williams oddly enough, but is ever so handsome nonetheless.

 

a friend of mine got these for me from the little mermaid.

tlm14_06082006.jpg

tlm18_06082006.jpg

tlm2_06082006.jpg

tlm3_06082006.jpg

 

 

And, Meine Kleine Butterscotcherin, thanks for dropping by the new thread on the block and don?t be a stranger, okay? BTW, did you see the alert for Enchanted April coming up on Feb 10 on TCM? Have you seen that one? If not, this is your TCM homework for the week. I figure any movie with three love stories in one is something that you will enjoy

 

yes i noticed that was coming on. i have been wanting to record it, so you dont have to tell me twice. heehee! i want to record it anyway. i have seen both versions of this movie, but grandmama is recording it to get a better copy of it. she does this to every movie she already has a copy of in her VHS library. our whole family thinks she is crazy, but i dont! heehee!

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By the way, for everyone who might be interested in Mike Newell's *Enchanted April*, I just found out the DVD is going to be released in May:

 

http://www.amazon.com/Enchanted-April-Josie-Lawrence/dp/B00005JL1R

 

Doesn't look to have any extras, but those who really like the movie might not mind.

 

Theresa, the photos you posted of Faerie Tale Theater's *The Little Mermaid* with Helen Mirren and Treat Williams are wonderful and certainly got me interested in this movie. I really do love Helen.... :x

 

Too bad that DVD is out of print. :(

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*bonjour johnnny on the spot!*

 

Bonjour Helengirl of Troy

 

*I see you mentioned our favorite, "The Little Minister", and thanks to you I found out about this?_and I even own my very own copy*_

 

 

*you might have a copy of it?! my jaw just dropped! find it,*

 

Uh, please reread what I wrote. Of course, I know where it is. And you know where I got it too, silly one ;)

 

*we cant have a pirate in a drunken rage going around to people's camp fires singing silly songs about innocent people can we?*

 

Why not? We should all try and make the world a better place.

 

*she won the Laurence Olivier Shakesperean award a while ago.*

 

Larry would be proud of her...I think.

 

*have your seen The Country Wife yet from that box set off netflix?*

 

Yes, I did. I think I wrote something over in P&P about that as well as some of the other things she did on those old tv shows that you recommended. Yes, she was up to her subterfuges in that one, sneaky girl.

 

*that is her playing Tatania lying down there on the cover.i would love to see that version as well to comapre it to her 1968 version.*

 

Remember though, she did not play Tatania in the earlier one. She played Hermia.

 

*but grandmama is recording it to get a better copy of it. she does this to every movie she already has a copy of in her VHS library. our whole family thinks she is crazy, but i dont!*

 

Neither do I. When the VHS era was in full swing I recorded everything and have records on what I have. I also used to replace older recordings with newer ones if I thought I could improve the quality. People would ask me, "What are you going to do with all those recordings?" That was not always a happy question but in many ways it's a stupid one. I love my archives. I have, for example (as I mentioned before) the '68 version of Midsummer and just a few days ago I realized I had A Doll House that I was able to watch on the spot. I'm always finding things there I don't even know I have. So, I understand your grandma and I tip my hat to her. She's got the right idea. And she has you to do it for, which I'm sure makes it more fun for her.

 

Again, nice pictures of Helen. I don't have access to youtube. Do they actually show the whole thing? How did your friend get those caps?

 

:)

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Bonjour Helengirl of Troy

 

bonjour drunken captain jack sparrow!

 

Uh, please reread what I wrote. Of course, I know where it is. And you know where I got it too, silly one

 

no silly, im not talking about The Little Minister silly! i know you have a copy of that, i meant the Midnight '68 version you have a VHS copy of in your library. :)

 

Why not? We should all try and make the world a better place.

 

trying to make the world a better place with a bottle of rum and a camp fire? wow! heehee! thats not how it was done with geena davis!

 

Yes, I did. I think I wrote something over in P&P about that as well as some of the other things she did on those old tv shows that you recommended. Yes, she was up to her subterfuges in that one, sneaky girl.

 

oh i havent gotten to read the last post i think. my computer has troubles getting into that thread sometimes. ill have to keep trying to get back into it so i can read it, i guess i can cut and paste it in this thread.

 

helen can be sneaky in just about every way possible in those BBC specials. i love that they casted her as an innocent naive girl who had no clue what she was doing until everything hit her at once. she was so funny!

 

Remember though, she did not play Tatania in the earlier one. She played Hermia.

 

i remember silly. there are very different screencaps from each that i have seen.

 

Neither do I. When the VHS era was in full swing I recorded everything and have records on what I have. I also used to replace older recordings with newer ones if I thought I could improve the quality. People would ask me, "What are you going to do with all those recordings?" That was not always a happy question but in many ways it's a stupid one. I love my archives. I have, for example (as I mentioned before) the '68 version of Midsummer and just a few days ago I realized I had A Doll House that I was able to watch on the spot. I'm always finding things there I don't even know I have. So, I understand your grandma and I tip my hat to her. She's got the right idea. And she has you to do it for, which I'm sure makes it more fun for her.

 

i have records too for my collection. im surely yours is really organized too! i number my discs and label them and then type up the list of movies i have, alphabetically with their numbers in the column next to them. grandmama taught me her system. she has said that if she dies, noone in the whole family, not even grandpapa could understand her system, only i can. heehee!

 

Again, nice pictures of Helen. I don't have access to youtube. Do they actually show the whole thing? How did your friend get those caps?

 

thanks! i love those pics too! is this a trick question? heehee! im a member of the Helen Mirren Appreciation society and there are people on there all over the world just like here and the person who put the whole movie on youtube of The Little Mermaid is on the HMAS board too. i wish greer had a special society too.

 

Message was edited by: butterscotchgreer

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